10 Books That You Might Have Missed but Shouldn’t

Ernest Hemingway
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Ernest Hemingway was a tangle of antithetical angels and demons—a prose genius, a monumental egotist, a generous friend, and an alcoholic depressive. Hendrickson brings all this into focus using Hemingway’s beloved Pilar, his boat in Cuba for the last 27 years of his life and on which he fished, chased German subs,
and acted the hero. This unfailingly intelligent meditation on the achievement of genius and the corrosion of fame brings a man we thought we knew to life in a wholly different light.

By Neil MacGregor
From the Rosetta Stone to a Ming bank note to a slave drum, the director of the British Museum’s elegant survey of world history shows us that even mundane artifacts reveal more about how we live than we’d sometimes care to admit.

A History of the World in 100 Objects by Neil MacGregor

By Craig Thompson
This brilliantly imagined graphic novel—a love story between two young people—begins in a sort of timeless Arabian Nights landscape and winds its way into a cluttered, modern, urban world. But more than anything, it celebrates the power of the artist to tell a story with ink teased into magisterial letters and visual images.

Habibi by Craig Thompson

By Michael Holroyd
Acclaimed biographer Holroyd here turns his attention to a villa in Italy and the women who, in the early 20th century, moved through its rooms—all of them connected (fiancée, lover, daughter) to an English aristocrat, Ernest Beckett. The result is a series of delightful cameo portraits and a dexterous meditation on the art of biography itself.

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By Roya Hakakian
Poet and journalist Roya Hakakian recounts the 1992 murders of four Iranian opposition members in Berlin, the lengthy trial that followed the event, and its profound diplomatic repercussions. Hakakian’s is a painstaking and riveting account—a true story that reads like an international thriller.

Assassins of the Torquoise Palace by Roya Hakakian

By Karl Marlantes
With the combat experience of a Vietnam vet, the sensitivity of a novelist, and the insights of a Rhodes scholar, Marlantes delivers one of the most powerful meditations on the meaning of war and its impact. A necessary book as America welcomes home a new generation of veterans.

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By Paul Hendrickson
Ernest Hemingway was a tangle of antithetical angels and demons—a prose genius, a monumental egotist, a generous friend, and an alcoholic depressive. Hendrickson brings all this into focus using Hemingway’s beloved Pilar, his boat in Cuba for the last 27 years of his life and on which he fished, chased German subs, and acted the hero. This unfailingly intelligent meditation on the achievement of genius and the corrosion of fame brings a man we thought we knew to life in a wholly different light.

Hemingway's Boat by Paul Hendrickson

By Hisham Matar
It was a coincidence that Matar’s novel was published as Muammar Gaddafi’s 42-year reign reached its bloody end, but this sensitive, eloquent work is the most insightful look inside the Libyan experience—as well as being one of the most moving works based on a boy’s view of the world.

Anatomy of a Disappearance by Hisham Matar

By Wade Davis
Notions of heroism and idealism were smothered in the trenches of World War I. Davis masterfully shows us how, six years after the Great War’s end, George Mallory and a group of climbers almost singlehandedly brought those noble ideas back to life on the slopes of Mount Everest.

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By Alexandra Fuller
In her more bucolic follow-up to Don’t Let’s Go to the Dogs Tonight, Fuller paints a loving portrait of her parents and the vicissitudes of farming as white settlers in an increasingly militant Africa. It is no knock on Fuller’s charming, low-key father to say that her mother, a wisecracking, Uzi-toting pioneer, runs off with the story in fabulous fashion.

Cocktail Hour Under the Tree of Forgetfulness by Alexandra Fuller

By Nicholas Wapshott
As we face off against the Great Recession, the only book you need to understand the debate raging in the streets today: economic freedom versus government intervention. And an essential primer on the two men who shaped modern finance.

Keynes and Hayek by Nicholas Wapshott

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