The 25 Best Schools for Do-Gooders

college-rankings-service-minded-intro-v2

Our partners at Washington Monthly determined which colleges have the most service-minded students, faculty, and policies by measuring these areas: the size of their Army and Navy Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) programs; the proportion of alumni in the Peace Corps; the percentage of federal work-study money spent  on community-service projects; the number of students participating in community service and their total service hours; whether classes incorporate service; and if there are service-based scholarships. Of the  510 schools they evaluated, here's how the top 25 stack up.

About Our Rankings:

Contributing editor Peter Bernstein and researcher Courtney Kennedy drew on dozens of sources to compile these rankings including information from the National Center for Education Statistics,  The Washington Monthly, and  College Prowler.   A portion of the data they used is represented in the following school profiles, but for the full methodologies, see our FAQ here.  And if you’re not a rankings fan, take a look at this piece by Colin Diver, the president of Reed College,  about why schools dislike rankings and how families can use them wisely as part of their college decision-making process. 

For more from College Prowler visit their website.

rhodes-college-ed08 Courtesy of Rhodes College

Rhodes College near Memphis, Tennessee, was founded in 1848. With 80 percent of the student population participating in community service, the private Presbyterian college tops Newsweek's list of colleges with the most service-minded students.*  
 
Rhodes credits its Presbyterian heritage for attracting students who are "passionate about learning, effecting change in their communities and the world, and exemplifying leadership and service with integrity." In 2009, the college enrolled 1,685 students, 74 percent of which were from outside Tennessee, including 65 international students. The student-to-faculty ratio is 10 to 1.  
 
The student body is comprised of 58 percent women. The majority--75 percent--of students are Caucasian, followed by African-Americans (7 percent), Asian-Americans (5 percent) and Hispanics (2 percent). Close to 80 percent of Rhodes College students graduate within four years.  
 
Tuition for the 2010-2011 school year at the private school is $43,060. Rhodes says 85 percent of its students receive some form of financial aid, with the average aid package totaling $30,629.  
 
*For the complete college rankings from the Washington Monthly, visit their website at www.washingtonmonthly.com.

Wofford College, a private liberal arts college in Spartanburg, South Carolina, was committed to community service from its founding as a Methodist institution in 1854. Today, the school is ranked second among Newsweek's list of 25 colleges with the most service-minded students.*  
 
In 2009, the school received 2,442 applications and accepted 58 percent of them. Of those students, 57 percent came from the top 10 percent of their graduating high-school class. Based on past figures, 77 percent of Wofford students can expect to graduate within four years.  
 
As for the campus's makeup, 41 percent of Wofford's students hail from out of state. Additionally, the campus consists of 50 percent women.  Racially, 84 percent of Wofford's students are white, seven percent African-American, three percent Asian-American and 2 percent Hispanic.  
 
Tuition for the 2009-2010 school year was $41,935, with 90 percent of students receiving aid.

*For the complete college rankings from the Washington Monthly, visit their website at www.washingtonmonthly.com.

byrn-mawr-college-ed08 Jim Roese / Courtesy of Bryn MawrCollege

Founded in 1885, Bryn Mawr College (its name means "great hill" in Welsh) was the first college to ever offer graduate degrees to someone other than a man, and the school maintains its legacy as a haven of higher education for women.  
 
Located in a town bearing its name in Pennsylvania, the school is one of the "Seven Sisters" colleges, which also includes Wellesley and Barnard. Enrolled students may cross-register with Haverford, Swarthmore and the University of Pennsylvania.    
 
The school offers 36 majors to about 1,300 undergraduates every year, 30 percent of who pursue natural sciences or math, compared with the seven percent of women in those majors nationwide. And with several students participating in community service and graduates serving in the Peace Corps, Bryn Mawr finds itself as the third most service-minded school on Newsweek's list.*
 
The school accepts about 49 percent of its applicants, and Bryn Mawr students average a 31 on the ACTs and 1410 on the SATs.

*For the complete college rankings from the Washington Monthly, visit their website at www.washingtonmonthly.com.

emory-and-henry-ed08 Daivd Grace / Courtesy of Emory and Henry College

Tucked away in the highlands of Southwest Virginia, Emory & Henry is a tiny school (with around 1,000 undergraduates) founded in the Methodist tradition; it so prides itself on service that students can even major in Public Policy and Community Service. In 2009, some 80 percent of E & M's "wasps" participated in community service, many of them through the school's Appalachian Center for Community Service, which focuses on the economic development of at-risk populations in the local community. In 2010, the school won a Presidential Award from the Corporation for National and Community Service, and now the college ranks fourth in our list of Best Schools for Service.*  
 
Founded in 1836, the entire campus is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, and today's environment is what the school calls "academical," and in the spirit of Thomas Jefferson in that it "underscores the broad dedication within the community to each student's enlightenment and success. In 2009-2010, students paid an average of $31,840 for tuition, fees, and room and board.

*For the complete college rankings from the Washington Monthly, visit their website at www.washingtonmonthly.com.

syracuse-university-ed08 Stephen Sartori / Courtesy of Syracuse University

Set in central New York State, Syracuse University is among the top five most service-minded schools in the United States, thanks to heavy student engagement with the Peace Corps, ROTC and other service programs.*  
 
Minority students comprise almost a quarter of the student body, with about seven percent of undergrads African-American, nearly eight percent Asian and six percent Hispanic. Fifty-seven percent of students are women, and more than half of the student body originates from outside of New York.
 
Founded in 1870, the private school hosts about 20,000 students, more than 15,000 of them undergrads, 57 percent of whom are women and about four-fifths of whom received some form of financial aid. Tuition for the 2009-2010 academic year was nearly $35,000. The school's faculty-to-student ratio is 1:15.

*For the complete college rankings from the Washington Monthly, visit their website at www.washingtonmonthly.com.

Bates-service-ed08 Courtesy of Bates College

Located in Lewiston, Maine, Bates College is rooted in inclusiveness. Founded in 1855 by abolitionists, it was one of the first higher-learning institutions to admit people of color, and later, women. Today, the college says it maintains its all-inclusive standards by prohibiting fraternities and sororities on campus.  
 
Approximately 1,700 people make up the student body at Bates, 47 percent of which play on varsity teams, placing it in the No. 4 spot on Newsweek's list of best schools for athletes.  With its Peace Corps-friendly student body and 21 percent of its federal work-study funds spent on community service, Bates ranks as the sixth most service-minded school.*  
 
All those athletes and altruists must enjoy the school's 109 acres (which include the Bates-Morse Mountain Conservation Area for environmental research and education, 40 miles northeast of campus on Maine's coast) as the school claims an impressive 96 percent return rate for first-year students.  
 
Those who attended Bates in 2009 spent $51,300 on tuition, room, board and fees, and the college's average grant per student in the fall of 2008 was $31,175.

*For the complete college rankings from the Washington Monthly, visit their website at www.washingtonmonthly.com.

wiedner-university-ed08 Courtesy of Widener University

Widener University emphasizes both academics and community service. A private, metropolitan university, Widener promotes community service in its campus locations and abroad. The school ranked seventh on our list of 25 most service-minded colleges for both the size of its Army and Navy Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) programs and the amount of federal-work study funds spent on community-service projects.*
 
Though the main campus is located in the large town of Chester, Pennsylvania, the school also has three other campuses in Exton and Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, and Wilmington, Delaware. Founded in 1821 as a preparatory school, today Widener has 3,147 undergraduates. Over 60 percent of classes have fewer than 20 students to best utilize its 12:1 student-to-faculty ratio.
 
The school's ROTC program is so popular that it sponsors students from six nearby colleges. Tuition is $33,270 and 70 percent of applicants are admitted to the university.

*For the complete college rankings from the Washington Monthly, visit their website at www.washingtonmonthly.com.

ripon-college-ed08 Courtesy of Ripon College

Located in a small Wisconsin town of the same name, Ripon College is the eighth most service-minded school in the nation, according to Newsweek rankings.* Founded in 1851, the school's mission is to prepare students for "productive, socially responsible citizenship."
 
The campus is situated on 250 acres, dense with trees and punctuated by historic limestone buildings. The private liberal arts school costs just over $25,000 for students to attend for the 2009-2010 academic year, nearly 5 percent more than the previous year. However, all of Ripon's students receive some form of financial aid.
 
The student body includes more than 1,000 undergrads, about 52 percent of who are female, and the school accepts just fewer than 80 percent of applicants. The student body is 85 percent white, three percent Hispanic, one percent Asian and one percent African-American.

*For the complete college rankings from the Washington Monthly, visit their website at www.washingtonmonthly.com.

college-william-and-mary-ed08

It's not easy to be counted among the College of William & Mary's students, with an acceptance rate of one in three and a student body that averaged 32 on the ACT and 1440 on the SAT. Steeped in as much history as its colonial Williamsburg, Virginia, location would suggest, the school is designated as the 21st most desirable suburban college by Newsweek. It also ranks ninth among our list of schools with the most service-minded students.* Counting three presidents among its alumni, the college comes in at No. 21 for future power brokers.
 
Named for King William III and Queen Mary II, the school became the second college established in the American colonies when it was chartered in 1693. The College of William & Mary attracts nearly 8,000 students a year, approximately 6,000 of them undergrads. Business and social sciences rank among the most popular majors, and the school offers a student-to-faculty ratio of 12:1.
 
In-state students paid tuition and fees of less than $11,000, while out-of-state students paid almost triple that for the 2009-2010 academic year according to the U.S. Department of Education.

*For the complete college rankings from the Washington Monthly, visit their website at www.washingtonmonthly.com.

centre-college-ed08 Chris Floyd / Courtesy of Centre College

Ranked by Newsweek as the tenth most service-minded school, Centre College has ties to the Presbyterian Church, and the school's "highest priority is to prepare its students for lives of learning, leadership and service," according to its mission statement.*    
 
The school accepts roughly 70 percent of applicants, and those who attend averaged a 30 on the ACT and 1370 on the SAT. Social sciences, history and biology are among the private, four-year liberal arts school's most popular majors. About 54 percent of its nearly 1,200 students are women.    
 
Though its campus sits in the center of Danville, Kentucky, Centre also offers a robust study-abroad program, in which 85 percent of students participate, many of them through the school's residential programs in France, Mexico and London in addition to exchange programs with England, Japan, China, and Northern Ireland. Centre College's annual expenses for a full-time undergraduate student during the 2009-2010 academic year was about $31,000, according to U.S. Department of Education estimates, which grew 5.4 percent from the previous academic year.

*For the complete college rankings from the Washington Monthly, visit their website at www.washingtonmonthly.com.

marquette-university-ed08 Courtesy of Marquette University

Counted by Newsweek as the 11th most service-minded college in the United States, Milwaukee-based Marquette University gets good marks for Peace Corps involvement, ROTC membership, and community service.* The Roman Catholic school "strives to develop men and women who will dedicate their lives to the service of others, actively entering into the struggle for a more just society." The school opened in 1881 as a small liberal arts college for men, but has grown to one of the largest coeducational Jesuit universities in the country; 52 percent of its students are women.
 
About 8,000 of Marquette's nearly 12,000 students are undergraduates. They enjoy a 14:1 student-to-faculty ratio and averaged a 29 on the ACT and 1280 on the SAT. Tuition to attend the private school during the 2009-2010 academic year was $29,000, up more than three percent from the previous year. Eighty-six percent of students receive some form of financial aid.  
 
The student body is 82 percent white, five percent black, six percent Hispanic and four percent Asian. Out-of-state students make up nearly 60 percent of the student body.

*For the complete college rankings from the Washington Monthly, visit their website at www.washingtonmonthly.com.

Given Illinois College's history, its rank as number twelve on our list of Best Schools for Service is not surprising.* Founded in 1829, the school's first president was Edward Beecher, the brother of Uncle Tom's Cabin author Harriet Beecher Stowe. It was a center of the abolitionist movement and two campus houses were reportedly stops along the Underground Railroad. Ninety percent of students volunteer in community-service projects each year and the school has ranked among the President's Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll for several years.  
 
The Jacksonville, Illinois, campus is home to only some 1,000 undergrads, but its endowment is so substantial that it ranks among the top seven percent of colleges and universities nationwide. The college cites its endowment as one of its major strengths, noting that it affords a remarkably low cost. According to the school, estimated tuition, fees, and room and board for the 2010-2011 academic year will be $30,700.

*For the complete college rankings from the Washington Monthly, visit their website at www.washingtonmonthly.com.

Founded in 1851 as a Baptist seminary, Carson-Newman College has since expanded into a four-year liberal arts college, but the Tennessee school remains loyal to its roots as an institute of religious leadership. Students are required to take classes in Old and New Testament in addition to attending chapel services every week. It's largely because of the school's Christian identity that it ranks 13th on our list of Best Schools for Service--the college's Campus Ministries Office places more than a thousand students in Christian missions and other service opportunities every year.* Like other schools on this list, many of these opportunities occur in the surrounding Appalachia, and the school says that some 30 different service programs are offered each semester.

Carson-Newman's campus is a half hour from Knoxville, and boasts views of the Smoky Mountains, plus access to hiking, mountain biking, and lakes. In 2009-2010, students paid an average of $23,250 for tuition, fees, and room and board--a remarkably low figure for a private institution.

*For the complete college rankings from the Washington Monthly, visit their website at www.washingtonmonthly.com.

university-of-san-diego-ed08 Courtesy of University of San Diego

"Beach life is addictive," writes one student on the University of San Diego's page on CollegeProwler.com. And with a campus that occupies 180 acres overlooking Mission Bay with views of the Pacific Ocean, how could it not be?  
 
That doesn't mean it's all play and no work for students at this private Roman Catholic school--the school is Number 18 on Newsweek's list of colleges combining a terrific climate with strong academics. Its mission is to advance academic excellence, expand liberal and professional knowledge and create a diverse and inclusive community while preparing leaders dedicated to ethical conduct and compassionate service. The school seems to be delivering on that mission, as the school also ranks 14th on the list of 25 schools with the most service-minded students.*
 
The University of San Diego, founded in 1949, today has more than 5000 undergraduates and 808 faculty. Women make up 58 percent of the student population. The majority of students come from California, and approximately 63 percent are white, followed by Hispanics (15percent), Asian-Americans (10percent) and African-Americans (3percent).  
 
The school admits 52 percent of its applicants, for a student to faculty ratio of 15 to 1.  
 
Tuition for 2010-2011 is $36,950. In the school year beginning in 2009, 60 percent of students received some form of financial aid. 

*For the complete college rankings from the Washington Monthly, visit their website at www.washingtonmonthly.com.

westminster-ed08 Courtesy of Westminster College

Westminster College, affiliated with the Presbyterian Church, is located in New Wilmington, Pennsylvania, and was founded in 1852. The private, liberal arts college prides itself on the fact that Habitat for Humanity is the largest student organization on campus. No wonder the school ranked 15th on Newsweek's list of 25 most service-minded schools.* Westminster also ranks tenth on our list for the most amount of federal work-study money spent on community-service projects.
 
With 1,469 undergraduates and a 12:1 student-to-faculty ratio, the quaint, residential community fosters a vibrant campus life with over 85 student organizations and ten national Greek Letter organizations. Westminster offers 41 majors and ten pre-professional programs to its students and is located 65 miles north of Pittsburgh.  
 
Tuition is $29,150 and it may be well worth the price--this year, the U.S. News & World Report ranked Westminster 15th among ranked liberal arts colleges for graduation-rate performance.  In addition, over 96 percent of recent graduates have found employment or are in graduate school.

*For the complete college rankings from the Washington Monthly, visit their website at www.washingtonmonthly.com.

davidson-college-ed08jpg Courtesy of Davidson College

Though Davidson College is a small liberal arts college with only 1,700 students (It's No. 14 on Newsweek's Most Desirable Small Schools list), it is also a Division I NCAA school that offers its students 35 intramural sports and 17 varsity teams, making it among the 30 best colleges for jocks.
 
However, academics are as important as athletics at Davidson, where the average student scored a 32 on the ACT and 1458 on the SAT, and only 26 percent of applicants get the chance to become a Wildcat. The college claims 23 Rhodes Scholars and regularly appears as one of the top ten liberal arts colleges, as ranked by U.S. News and World Report. Davidson's smart and sporty students also make time for the community as evidenced by the college's ranking as the 16th most service-minded school on Newsweek's list.*    
 
Davidson College was the first liberal arts school to favor grants over loans in all of its financial aid packages, enabling students to graduate without the onus of student loans. Established in 1837, the school is situated 20 minutes north of Charlotte, North Carolina, making it the 12th most desirable suburban institution.

*For the complete college rankings from the Washington Monthly, visit their website at www.washingtonmonthly.com.

st-johns-ed08 Courtesy of St. Johns University

Since 1865, St. John's University has produced its own coarse-grained bread--known as Johnnie Bread--and used the proceeds to fund worthy causes. This tradition seems to reflect a larger interest at the Catholic school in giving back to the community. Indeed, with a large Navy Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) program and many alums flocking to the Peace Corps, St. John's comes in at No. 17 on Newsweek's list of most service-minded schools.*
 
Founded by Benedictine communities in the 19th century, St. John's continues to foster Benedictine Catholic values on campus. College of Saint Benedict, for women, and Saint John's University, for men, share one academic program, which offers more than 60 areas of study with 36 majors and 32 minor programs. The 3,800 students attend classes together on both campuses, where the student-to-faculty ratio is 12:1, and the median class size is 20. But, in an attempt to address the "unique needs" of both men and women, the two schools also retain their own residence halls, athletic programs, and traditions.
 
Pristine forests, prairies, and lakes surround Saint Benedict and Saint John's, located just minutes away from the St. Cloud metropolitan area and 70 miles from Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minnesota. Undergraduate tuition totals $31,250. Through a four-year residency program, nearly all students live on campus.

*For the complete college rankings from the Washington Monthly, visit their website at www.washingtonmonthly.com.

morehouse-college-ed08 Courtesy of Morehouse College

Morehouse College is a school steeped in history and tradition--including a long history of service. An all-male, private, historically black college founded in 1867, the school is one of three remaining all-male colleges in the United States. The school ranks ninth on Newsweek's list for the size of its Army and Navy Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) program and 18th on Newsweek's list of 25 colleges with the most service-minded students, faculty and policies.*  
 
Morehouse men are all about giving back to their community. A residential campus within a city of 500,000, 75 percent of the student body volunteers. The college offers academic programs in three divisions: business and economics, humanities and social sciences, and science and mathematics.  
 
A member of the "Black Ivy League", 96 percent of its 2,689 students are black. Morehouse accepts 67 percent of applicants and charges $22,444 for tuition.

*For the complete college rankings from the Washington Monthly, visit their website at www.washingtonmonthly.com.

tulane-university-ed08jpg Courtesy of Tulane University

Offering 140 courses that have what the school calls "service-learning components," its claim to be the only "highly research-intensive school in the country that includes public service as a graduation requirement," in addition to its strong participation in the Peace Corps and ROTC, make Tulane University the 19th most service-minded school in the country.*
 
Founded in 1834, the school has grown to hold more than 11,000 students, approximately 7,000 of who are undergraduates. The school offers an 8:1 student-to-faculty ratio, but admits only about a quarter of applicants.
 
The cost to attend the private New Orleans-based school for the 2009-2010 academic year was more than $40,000, a five percent increase from the previous year. Eighty-one percent of students receive some form of financial aid. The student body is 55 percent female, 69 percent white, ten percent black, four percent Hispanic and four percent Asian.

*For the complete college rankings from the Washington Monthly, visit their website at www.washingtonmonthly.com.

college-holy-cross-ed08 Courtesy of College of the Holy Cross

Established in the first half of the 19th century by a Boston Bishop, the College of the Holy Cross was among the first Jesuit colleges in New England and remains one of the oldest Roman Catholic colleges in the country, helping to secure the school's place at No. 20 on Newsweek's Most Service-Minded Schools list.*   
 
Located in central Massachusetts, the school occupies a hilltop that "provides inspiring views" of its home in Worcester, which the school calls a "forward-looking city of 170,000" and is home to several other institutions of higher learning.    
 
The liberal arts school attracts nearly 3,000 undergrads and offers a student-to-faculty ratio of 11:1. However, acceptance is competitive, as the school admits less than 40 percent of applicants, and those who are admitted scored a 30 on the ACT and 1350 on the SAT, on average. The most popular majors include social sciences, particularly economics. Tuition and fees for the 2009-2010 academic year was more than $38,000, according to the U.S. Department of Education.

*For the complete college rankings from the Washington Monthly, visit their website at www.washingtonmonthly.com.

Collectively known as "The Colleges of the Seneca," Hobart & William Smith Colleges collaborate to form one institution. Though the two schools compete with separate athletic teams, they share academic facilities and faculty, offering not only Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degrees, but also a Master of the Arts in Teaching.  
 
During World War II, Hobart initiated what would become a lasting tradition of service at both colleges, training almost 1,000 men in the Navy's V-12 program. Both branches' ongoing service-mindedness earns Hobart & William Smith Colleges 21st place on Newsweek's list of most service-minded schools.*

*For the complete college rankings from the Washington Monthly, visit their website at www.washingtonmonthly.com.

ohio-wesleyan-ed08 Courtesy of Ohio Wesleyan University

Ohio Wesleyan University was founded in 1842 by two local residents who named the college after the founder of Methodism, John Wesley. Initially transformed from a hotel, the college now spans over 200 acres and has a 13:1 student-to-faculty ratio. With over 40 approved study-abroad programs and international students making up ten percent of the student body, the school emphasizes internationalism and service. Today, the school is ranked 22nd among Newsweek's list of 25 most service-minded colleges.*  
 
The Delaware, Ohio-based private, liberal arts college offers merit-based scholarships ranging from $3,000 to full tuition ($36,398) and over 90 percent of students have their full need met. Over a dozen groups on campus are devoted solely to leadership or service. The small school of 1,959 undergraduates boasts two recent Fulbright scholars and one Guggenheim scholar.  
 
Ohio Wesleyan accepts 64 percent of its 3,800 applicants every year and prides itself on its internationalism, with students from 47 states and 50 countries. Alumni of the school have been known to found their own colleges abroad.

*For the complete college rankings from the Washington Monthly, visit their website at www.washingtonmonthly.com.

pitzer-college-ed08 Courtesy of Pitzer College

Pitzer College is the third largest member of the Claremont Colleges (a grouping which also includes Claremont McKenna, Pomona, Harvey Mudd and Scripps). Pitzer students are known for their involvement beyond the campus: Not only does a high percentage of students study abroad each year (70percent compared to 2 percent nationwide) Pitzer's students also maintain a strong tradition of local involvement and community service. With over 100,000 hours of service donated annually from Pitzer students, this college ranks 23 on Newsweek's list of most service-minded schools.*

*For the complete college rankings from the Washington Monthly, visit their website at www.washingtonmonthly.com.

simpson_college-ed08 Courtesy of Simpson College

Simpson College was founded in 1860 after its namesake minister Matthew Simpson of the United Methodist Church. It's no coincidence that service is emphasized in its mission. Today, the school is ranked 24th among Newsweek's list of 25 most service-minded colleges.*  
 
The Indianola, Iowa-based private liberal arts college has only 1,485 full-time undergrads, but over 75 acres of land and a 14:1 student-to-faculty ratio. In keeping with the school's mission, 84 percent of students are involved in extracurricular activities on campus, many of them service-based. Located in a large town of 13,000, Simpsonians have easy access to the state capital of Des Moines, which is only a dozen miles away.  
 
The school prides itself on its unique trimester schedule, which includes a May term that students use to pursue internships, volunteer opportunities or specialized study on or off campus. Tuition is $23,596 a year and Simpson has been ranked as one of the top ten comprehensive colleges in the Midwest by U.S. News & World Report.

*For the complete college rankings from the Washington Monthly, visit their website at www.washingtonmonthly.com.

bowdoin-college-ed08 Bob Handelman / Courtesy of Bowdoin College

Selective, athletic, intellectually rigorous and historic Bowdoin College is the 18th most desirable school in the country, according to Newsweek's rankings. Located in scenic Brunswick, Maine, the school also finds itself fourth on the list for most desirable rural schools and the sixth most desirable small school.  
 
The private school, with only 1800 undergraduates, is very selective, admitting less than one in five applicants. Those who attend scored high on both the SAT and ACT, averaging 1510 on the former and 33 on the latter. The school offers more than 40 majors, with the most popular majors in the social sciences, including economics and political science, which may account for Bowdoin's 24th place on Newsweek's list for future power brokers. The school also takes spot No. 25 for its service-minded culture.*
 
The student body exercises their bodies as much as their minds, with 39 percent playing on one of 28 varsity teams. There are an additional 51 intramural sports on offer, making Bowdoin the fifth-ranked on our list of best schools for jocks.   
 
Tuition for the 2009-2010 academic year averaged around $40,000, and about 45 percent of students received financial aid. The student body is 66 percent white, 12 percent Asian, 10 percent Hispanic, 6 percent African-American and 51 percent female. Eighty-three percent hail from out of state.

*For the complete college rankings from the Washington Monthly, visit their website at www.washingtonmonthly.com.

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