Allison Samuels

Stories by Allison Samuels

  • A Legend Comes To Life

    When you consider the short, sad life of Dorothy Dandridge, it has a familiar ring. She was a child performer who rose to sudden stardom, a sex symbol who was frustrated as an actress, a victim of two bad marriages, dead at 42 of an overdose. But Dandridge had one historic triumph. She was the first African-American to be nominated for a best-actress Oscar, for "Carmen Jones" in 1954 (Grace Kelly won, for "The Country Girl"). "I fell in love with Dorothy as a child, the first time I saw her in 'Carmen Jones'," says Halle Berry, 33, who stars this week in "Introducing Dorothy Dandridge." "I knew I wanted to be an actress just because of her and how she jumped off the screen."Though her movie career was short, Dandridge is in no danger of becoming a footnote. Two biographies have come out in the last decade, and Berry's been vying with Whitney Houston, who bought rights to one of the books, to get her film out first. Besides the eerie coincidence of Berry and Dandridge being born in...
  • Kobe Goes It Alone

    At the end of the Los Angeles Lakers' tumultuous season, Kobe Bryant will, as he has after every game and practice, "get ghost." Nobody exits the L.A. Forum swifter than Bryant, signing a few autographs on the fly till he disappears behind the tinted windows of his jet-black Mercedes coupe. Sanctuary lies a few miles up the coast in a sprawling, six-bedroom Pacific Palisades manse, where Kobe lives with his parents and an older sister. In his bedroom, with the Italian marble floor, the Jacuzzi and the spectacular ocean view, Bryant retreats into reverie in which there are only triumphs. "Like that game against Houston [in this year's playoffs] where I made those free throws at the end of the game and we won," says Bryant. "I've dreamed about that many times. I like to dream about it again."At 20, Bryant is already living the modern American dream, a $70 million man on the NBA's glamour team in the nation's starriest city. His acrobatic moves make him the envy of teenage boys and his...
  • The New Color Line

    The big shocker at last week's NFL draft came when Ricky Williams, winner of the Heisman Trophy at the University of Texas as college football's premier player, wasn't the first running back chosen. For a guy who hasn't even played his first NFL game, Williams has already been involved in more than his share of surprises. A few months ago he stunned the league when he dropped his agent from an established firm and became the first pro footballer to join rapper Master P's new sports-management group. In a deal sealed over sweet-potato pie at Master P's Baton Rouge, La., mansion, Williams signed on in front of a large ensemble of family and new friends. "That night it was all about family, not business," Williams told NEWSWEEK. "These people are going to be down for me through the good and bad--just like family. That's the fit I needed."There were rumors--denied by the Indianapolis Colts, which passed on the Texas star--that Williams's draft slip was related to his new "family," who...
  • Surly Worm Gets The Bird

    After a loss three weeks ago, Los Angeles Lakers coach Kurt Rambis was berating the team in the locker room. Dennis Rodman raised his hand, according to two teammates. "May I say," Rodman offered, "what a sh-tty coach you are?" Last Thursday, after "The Worm" showed up late for yet another practice, Rambis and owner Jerry Buss finally put an end to Rodman's two-month tenure, waiving him and agreeing to pay the remainder of his $600,000 contract. (Neither team executive would comment.) Rodman's teammates, whom he had carelessly criticized in the press, including NEWSWEEK, were neither surprised nor sorry to see him go. "He was coming into practice--if he got there--smelling like pure alcohol," said one. "He had been nothing but trouble on a team with enough trouble without him. We couldn't take it anymore and he didn't seem to [care]. That was the big problem."Rodman denied the drinking charge, and told NEWSWEEK that he was being made the scapegoat for a team playing below...
  • Laker Maker Or Laker Breaker?

    No one can cram more tumult into 48 hours than Dennis Rodman. Take, for example, one recent weekend that began Friday night with the Lakers power forward being benched after a sideline spat with new coach Kurt Rambis. Neither that nor the L.A. loss kept Rodman from donning cowboy boots and hat later to party the night away at a Whitney Houston bash in Beverly Hills. By Saturday afternoon, he wasn't in much of a mood for practice, showing up--without apology and with a new peroxide 'do--75 minutes late. "Dennis is doing what Dennis needs to do," said Rambis, who kept Rodman in the starting lineup Sunday for a key tussle with New York. Rodman responded by wreaking basketball havoc as only he can. It wasn't just his team-leading 12 rebounds, but rather how the Lakers seemed to embrace his roughhouse style. And Rodman's "conniving, cunning" tactics, as he calls them, goaded two Knicks into stupid retaliations, which got them tossed out of the game. After the Laker win, Rodman ho-hummed...
  • She's Got Her Own Game

    Standing ovations don't mean what they used to; sports fans today give them up easily and often. Still, few athletes get a standing "O" just for stepping on the basketball court--during warm-ups. The instant Tennessee forward Chamique Holdsclaw appeared at the Southeastern Conference tourney in Chattanooga last week, a sea of orange and white rose in the stands. A chant of "Cha-mique, Cha-mique,'' rolled off fans' tongues as easily as the ponytailed, 6-foot-2 Holdsclaw glided down the court. "It's kinda weird, but I always think they're clapping for someone else," said the 22-year-old senior before leading UT to the conference championship. "I never get used to the response that people have toward me."She may have to get used to it. Holdsclaw (her first name is pronounced Shuh-Meek-Wah) may not turn out to be "the female Michael Jordan.'' (She wears number 23, too, but in honor of her favorite Biblical psalm, not MJ.) But she certainly has the skills and the charisma to become the...
  • Taking Rap Back To Its Real Roots

    Enough with the endless sampling and the cheesy million-dollar videos, says the Philadelphia-based act the Roots. It's time to make rap real again. "Now it's all about money and talking about how many women you have and cars you drive," says drummer ?uestlove. "Corporate America has taken it over."But less sampling doesn't spell a lack of influences. The group's sublime album, "Things Fall Apart,'' takes its title from Chinua Achebe's novel about colonizers who destroy an African community. Another track splices in a scene from Spike Lee's "Mo' Better Blues.''The Roots call for a return to the old school of rap with their live band sound and their midtempo beats, but the best track is "You Got Me,'' a love song featuring Erykah Badu. (The group produced and performed on her Grammy-winning album.) With Badu's earthy falsetto and frontman Black Thought's smooth Philly flow, the song will likely become an anthem for the Lauryn Hill crowd. "Things Fall Apart'' reminds us that truly good...
  • Taking It Hard To The Nba Hoop

    THROUGHOUT THE '90S, NBA basketball has increasingly become a one-on-one game. So it seems appropriate that saving this season--perhaps even the league--came down last week to NBA Commissioner David Stern and players' union chief Billy Hunter going head to head in an all-night negotiating session. But going one on one with Stern at the table is a bit like going one on one with Michael Jordan on the court; the inevitable result is a slam-dunk. When the deal was finally struck in the predawn hours Wednesday, Stern had led the owners, in playoff parlance, to virtually a clean sweep.Hunter insisted the six-year agreement (with a league option for a seventh) that ended the six-month lockout was a genuine compromise. With a league vote on canceling the season less than 40 hours away, he said, ""We both blinked.'' But Hunter likely mistook a Stern wink. While the NBA players remain the best-paid athletes in the world, the league exacted extraordinary concessions (chart), including a...
  • Denver's No-Flash Back

    HE HAD HIS FIRST TASTE OF football stardom at the age of 8 when he earned the nickname ""Boss Hogg'' as a bowl-'em-over running back on a Pop Warner team in San Diego. So Terrell Davis was thrilled to accompany his Denver Broncos teammate John Elway to see John's son play in a Pop Warner game. The parents and kids may have become blase about seeing the superstar quarterback, but they thronged Terrell, seeking autographs, handshakes, even hugs. Davis, 26, still a reluctant star in his fourth NFL season, was so nonplused by the attention that he fled the field. ""I don't think I've completely mastered the idea of being famous yet,'' says Davis.Fame has become an increasing predicament for Davis since the Broncos' upset win over Green Bay in Super Bowl XXXII. The victory will be remembered as the crowning achievement of Elway's Hall of Fame career, but it was Davis who earned the MVP trophy. ""Terrell is, no question, the greatest back I've ever played with,'' says Elway, who had been...
  • Hoop Nightmare

    When a basketball star choked and tried to punch his coach, it highlighted a growing culture clash in the NBA. Are the game's bad boys, old-guard coaches or the hype-hungry endorsement industry to blame?In pro sports ugly usually begets uglier. And the incident in Oakland where Golden State Warriors star Latrell Sprewell assaulted his coach, P. J. Carlesimo, during a practice was plenty ugly from the start. After the coach scolded him for a lacklu ster effort, a teammate told NEWSWEEK, Sprewell ""went straight playground" on Carlesimo: ""Bitch, you're gonna trade me or I'm gonna kill you." Then he apparently decided not to wait for that first option, seizing the coach's throat. Players pulled Spre well off, and the 27-year-old all-star guard was ushered out of the gym. But 15 minutes later he returned and lunged at Carlesimo again, striking him a glancing blow to the neck. ""You prepare for a lot of things in the course of a career," said Carlesim o, who has had strained relations...
  • Amistad's Struggle

    BORN WITH OUR eyes on the future, we Americans are notoriously oblivious to history--our own or anyone else's. Unless we are personally involved, our attitude goes, it's nothing to get worked up about. Did anyone, other than a few spoilsport movie critics, take umbrage when the new animated film ""Anastasia'' claimed that Rasputin's curse caused the Russian Revolution? ...
  • Ready For His Close-Up

    EVEN BACK IN JUNIOR HIGH IN Indianapolis, Kenneth Edmonds--you know him as Babyface--was more or less the guy he is now. He was in his first band then; onstage, he'd let others sing as he hung back, playing guitar, registering the crowd's response. ""I'd watch to see what they reacted to,'' he recalls. ""We were doing other people's songs and it helped me see what I needed to write so people would be drawn to it. I've always paid close attention to what makes people tick.'' ...
  • Black Beauty's New Face

    ALEK WEK GIGGLES A LOT. SHE giggles at the mere mention of Method Man, her favorite rapper, and she giggles when she talks about sashaying down the runways of New York, Paris and Milan. And why shouldn't she? At 20, Wek is the hottest face in fashion, keeping heads turning with her flawless ebony skin, tightly cropped hair and never-ending legs. Cameos in Janet Jackson and Busta Rhymes music videos have even made her a strikingly different-looking presence on MTV. After Wek modeled Cynthia Rowley's spring line two weeks ago, the designer declared that ""her happy personality wears the clothes.''""It's all been such a blast--particularly seeing myself on MTV,'' says Wek in her thick British accent. ""It's just been real fun--that's the best I can say.'' Born into the Dinka tribe in Sudan, Wek escaped the war-torn country with her family when she was 14. After relocating to London, the 5-foot-11 beauty was discovered at an outdoor market two years ago. Since then her African look has...
  • Going Hard To The Hoop

    A DOZEN PHILADELPHIA PLAYERS ARE streaking up and down the court in three-on-three drills, but new 76ers coach Larry Brown only has eyes--and instructions--for one. ""Allen, go down the lane sooner,'' Brown urges. ""Allen, get to your position sooner.'' ""Allen, space out.'' Allen Iverson acknowledges his coach with a slight nod and hustles to comply. Only when the coach is finished with his tutelage does Iverson relax with some hip-hop dance steps and jocular high-fives. Those awaiting the conflagration or, at the very least, clash as the NBA's most controversial young star begins play this season for one of basketball's most relentless teachers have so far been disappointed. ""All those people who were saying that we wouldn't get along were so full of bull,'' said the 22-year-old point guard. ""Coach Brown is a great coach who can help us win, and that's something I can definitely get along with.''Having proclaimed himself--by both word and tattoo--""The Answer'' before he played...
  • Not Losing His Religion

    EVEN THE LAMEST PERFORMERS GET standing ovations these days, but how many singers can lay claim to three hours of body-swaying adoration? Welcome to a Kirk Franklin concert, a musical lovefest of remarkable dimensions. It's a Saturday night at the Universal Amphitheater in Los Angeles, and Franklin's sold-out audience is packed with hip-hop kids in baggy pants and baseball caps standing with middle-age folks in Sunday-best suits and floral hats. The front row is filled with stars like Brandy, Angela Bassett and Stevie Wonder. It's an odd mix. But what's more surprising is that they've come together to hear a gospel singer. Franklin, 27, may dress in electric blue pants and psychedelic vests, but he says his nationwide Tour of Life is about redemption first and entertainment a distant second. ""I'm doing what it takes to get the attention of my generation,'' he says. ""Kids are killing their parents. They're lost. Someone has to bring them back.'' ...
  • Bring In 'Da Night

    A YEAR AGO QUINCY JONES COULDN'T buy a booking in late-night to hawk his 33d album, ""Q's Jook Joint.'' The 64-year-old music man, perhaps the most influential African-American in Hollywood, was told that Leno wasn't interested and that Letterman's people wanted him only if he'd perform, which he hasn't done in 23 years because of a medical condition. Jones didn't get mad. He got even. ...
  • No Laughing Matter

    AUTUMN JACKSON, THE 22-YEAR-OLD college dropout accused of squeezing Bill Cosby for $40 million, wept into her hands when the guilty verdict was read last Friday. ""How could they?'' she asked her lawyer, seemingly dazed by the jury's decision after three days of deliberations. After threatening to tell the tabloids that Cosby was her true father, Jackson and Jose Medina, a codefendant, now face up to 12 years in prison and as much as $750,000 in fines. Still mourning the murder of their only son, Cosby and his wife of 33 years, Camille, were said to be relieved. ""Camille's suffered greatly in the past few months, and not even this will ease her pain,'' a close friend told NEWSWEEK. ""But at least it's over.'' ...
  • Straight Outta Cleveland

    ST. CLAIR AND EAST 99TH STREET IN Cleveland is a tough neighborhood to call home. A smaller version of Compton, Calif., complete with drive-bys, crackheads and street pharmacists, it's the kind of place where young black men die almost every day. Bone Thugs-N-Harmony grew up here, and they still fit in. Bizzy Bone, Wish Bone, Krayzie Bone and Layzie Bone (they won't give their real names) are hanging out in Gordon Park, helping out on a video shoot for some friends of theirs. They're dressed in baggy shirts and baggy pants, with their hair either pulled back into long braids or fluffed and puffed out. Though they've moved to different parts of the city now (a fifth member, Flesh-N-Bone, lives in L.A.), Bone Thugs-N-Harmony try to keep these streets a part of their identity. ""We always want to give off that Cleveland vibe, and we always put our city in our music,'' says Layzie Bone. ""We ain't got nothing to do with no West Coast, East Coast s--t. We're just making music that sounds...
  • A Comic's Erratic Ride

    MARTIN LAWRENCE WAS SUPPOSED to be the next Eddie Murphy. Five years ago he'd just costarred in back-to-back hit movies, ""House Party'' and ""Boomerang,'' and signed a deal with Fox to star in the network's first African-American sitcom, ""Martin.'' Now Lawrence sits in his publicist's office looking fragile, sounding sedate and talking guardedly about getting his life back on track after months of chaos, both personal and professional. ""I want more kids,'' he says quietly. ""That's the only thing in my personal life that I'm sure of.'' ...
  • And Then There Were Three...

    THE MEMBERS OF EN VOGUE REALLY sort of like each other, and they 're about to prove it. Terry Ellis, Cindy and Maxine Jones are in an L.A. studio, finishing remixes for their new album, "EV3." Nobody's floating airs. Despite the high-tech glam of their image, each looks down-to-earth, casual. Ellis wears denim overalls, Braggs is in a hockey jersey and leggings and Jones goes for simple chic in jeans and a T shirt. They're contemplating the three years of management squabbles, financial traumas and personal upheavals that temporarily drove the group apart, caused the departure of one member and nearly ended En Vogue for good. Jones drops her voice to a whisper. "We weren't in touch that much, but I did miss them," she pledges, with an expectant look at her bandmates. Neither rises to the bait. Finally Ellis and Braggs nod slowly in agreement. Now, with that bit of sisterly love out of the way, can they get on with the interview? ...
  • The Fire This Time

    THE POLICE FOUND MALCOLM SHAbazz, 12, in the early hours of Sunday, June 1, disoriented and reeking of gasoline. He was a few blocks away from the Yonkers, N.Y., apartment where he had recently moved to live with his grandmother. His mother, Qubilah Shabazz, 36, was back in San Antonio, Texas, separated from the son whose years have been as nomadic and unstable as her own; his grandmother Betty Shabazz, 61, was fighting for her life, burned over 80 percent of her body. And Malcolm, the grandson of Malcolm X, was walking between generations of his haunted family, walking away from the fire that has burned through the family for longer than the boy could know. Last week he was taken into custody in connection with the blaze and underwent psychiatric evaluation. He has not been charged. ...
  • A Diva Does It Her Way

    MARY J. BLIGE HAS BEEN TO CHARM SCHOOL. Back in 1993, she was still overwhelmed by success and reportedly showed up at interviews high, drunk or not at all. Her advisers were bent on changing her world-be-damned ways, so they enrolled her in a school for round-the-way girls. "Hell, I already knew how to sit right and talk right," says Blige. "I just didn't want to be Ms. Prissy or any of that other bulls--t. And even if I didn't know how to set my fork down right, f--k it--this is the way I want to eat, so screw whoever doesn't like it." Got that? Blige prides herself on representing the hard-core urban world she knew growing up in the notorious "Slow Bomb" project in Yonkers, N.Y. And as she releases her third effort, "Share My World," she knows that change would be a crime her fans would never forgive. ...
  • Unchained Melody

    IN THE MIDDLE OF THE NIGHT, IN the middle of a storm, in the middle of an ocean, 53 Africans break out of their chains and slaughter the crew of a Cuban slave ship called the Amistad. True story. Unfortunately, the Africans don't know how to sail. Their leader, a tribesman named Cinque ("Sinkay"), lets the captain and the first mate live and demands the ship return to Sierra Leone. Instead, the Cubans take them to New York's Long Island, where they're captured and put on trial. The Africans should never have been on the Amistad in the first place: it's 1839, and kidnapping slaves from Africa has been illegal for years. So the venal prosecutors claim the slaves are Cuban. How can Cinque et al. prove their identity? They can't speak English. They don't even know you're supposed to stand when the judge walks in. ...
  • Death Of A 'Hero'

    BILL AND CAMILLE Cosby made a point of keeping their five children out of the meat grinder that can chew up the children of the rich and famous. But it's not like America didn't know their only son, Ennis. The joys and jolts of parenthood had always been a wellspring for his father's comedy, especially in his landmark sitcom "The Cosby Show." Ennis's struggles in school were fodder for the very first episode, in 1984. His triumphant college graduation was reprised in the show's 1992 finale by his TV alter ego, the sly but lovable Theo Huxtable. If Bill Cosby became surrogate father to a generation, Ennis was all in the family. Which is why his murder last week on a desolate offramp of a Los Angeles freeway cut so deep. When a remarkably poised Bill Cosby returned to his New York town house just after hearing about his son, he told the mass of hovering reporters: "He was my hero." The nation knew exactly what he meant.But if young Ennis Cosby's life was full of promise, his death...
  • Last Tango In Compton

    EVEN IF YOU KNOW NOTHING ABOUT the man, Dr. Dre's ""Been There, Done That'' is a video strange enough to freeze a channel-surfer's thumb: a Busby Berkeleyan ballroom-full of sleek couples in evening dress, all of them black, doing the tango in subtly infernal light, to violin music as eerily insistent as the soundtrack to a fever dream. But only when you realize that the sexy yet Buddha-like master of these slinky revels was both a founding father of gangsta rap--his breakthrough hit was N.W.A's ""F--- tha Police''--and a bona fide bad boy in real life can you truly appreciate how odd this all is. It must have surprised some of Dre's old homies to learn that last August he spent three days in a dance studio in the San Fernando Valley taking tango lessons. Then again, maybe not. As a kid in Compton, Calif., he wielded the turntable at his mother's house parties. As a teenage skating-rink deejay, he was considered the best ""mixologist'' in L.A. As a self-taught producer, he's been...
  • Strutting His Stuff

    LOS ANGELES IS NO PLACE FOR THE shy, and Shaquille O'Neal feels right at home. Here he is one recent evening onstage at a Sunset Strip club, celebrating the launch of his new record label, T.W.IsM. (This World Is Mine). At 7 feet 1 and 300 pounds, he is decked out head to toe in turquoise leather--with a $120 million basketball contract under one arm and a MAN OF STEEL tattoo emblazoned on the other. The audience is a hip-hop who's who, including Warren G, Bobby Brown, Rick James, TLC and Dean Cain, the much smaller fellow who plays Superman on TV. Here is Shaq, hear him roar: ...
  • Man Of Peace

    SNOOP DOGGY DOGG DOES NOT RUN with the pack. After he and his bodyguard were charged with the 1993 killing of an alleged L.A. gang member--both were acquitted earlier this year--the rapper decided to stay out of trouble for good. Snoop began flying in different planes from the ones used by the controversial entourage of Death Row Records, which included CEO Suge Knight and the late rapper Tupac Shakur. He began riding in different limos, staying in different hotels. He concentrated on his 2-year-old son, CordE. He did not want to get caught up in rivalries. He did not want to die. ""It's not about any fighting and fussing with me,'' says Snoop. He is speaking softly and looking at the floor, which is what he always looks at. ""All through the trial I just thought about my son and how I had to be out to see him grow up. I wasn't getting caught up in any bulls--t again. My son's face is the first one I see in the morning and the last one at night, and that's the way I want it to stay....
  • Will O.J. Get The Kids?

    THERE MAY BE A GAG ORDER IMPOSED on O. J. Simpson for his upcoming civil trial, but you would have hardly known it last week. Sure, he didn't say anything substantive about the trial (set to begin Sept. 17). But in another of a series of visits to black churches, Simpson spoke at Washington, D.C.'s Scripture Cathedral and managed to stir more headlines. He attacked the white media, hinting at one point he has a ""hit list'' of news organizations he might sue for what he called ""untruths.'' He went after CNBC's Geraldo Rivera, likening him to a ""jackal'' and a ""buzzard'' (an attack Rivera said he took as a badge of achievement). And, noting that blacks are sometimes told to go back to Africa, Simpson said whites who don't like his acquittal on murder charges could go back to Europe. ...
  • From Boys To Men

    IT'S BEEN 10 YEARS SINCE BOBBY Brown and New Edition worked together, but some things never change. On a Friday evening, the other five members of the most popular R&B group of the '80s -- Ronnie DeVoe, Ricky Bell, Michael Bivins, Ralph Tresvant and Johnny Gill -- are gathered at a Hollywood recording studio, waiting for Bobby. Everyone else managed to be there on time at 3 p.m. for a rehearsal for some dance steps from their video ""Hit Me Off,'' the debut single from their reunion album ""Home Again.'' But it's after 6 p.m. when Brown finally arrives. He makes a point of hugging everyone to show he's sorry for the delay. And the others let him off the hook. Later, during the rehearsal, it's easy to see why. Bobby may be the group's biggest pain in the neck, but he's also got the most style and charisma. When it's time to get down on the dance floor, the others go part of the way down; Bobby goes way, way down. ...
  • Box Office Prince

    WILL SMITH BATTLES ALIENS IN ""Independence Day,'' but that's nothing. Right now he's battling his own bodyguard. Tron is a 6-foot-4, 300-pound superhuman life force, and he has something Smith wants very badly: a newspaper. Smith makes a mad dash toward him. He grabs for the paper, but Tron swipes it away. They wrestle each other onto a couch, tussle and then: victory! Smith opens the paper to the movie grosses. ""Ninety-two million bucks over the first weekend,'' he exults. ""Incredible!'' A big smile spreads across his sweet-as-pie face.Saving the world, breaking box-office records -- these days it seems Smith can do anything. At 27, he's got one of the most impressively varied rsums in young Hollywood. In 1993 he earned heaps of praise for his portrayal of a young homosexual posing as Sidney Poitier's son in the film ""Six Degrees of Separation.'' Last year he scored commercially with Martin Lawrence in the buddy-action picture ""Bad Boys.'' With ""Independence Day,'' he goes...
  • Party Of The Century

    THE TAN LEATHER SWIVEL CHAIRS were still at the bar -- the same bar at which Det. Mark Fuhrman parked Kato Kaelin while he went rooting around out back for some evidence. To the left was an O.J. shrine, a recessed pool-table room still filled with old footballs and other memorabilia. To the right was the desert-white-and-beige family room, with its baby grand piano and a media center, where homicide detectives had watched the Simpson ""Frogman'' tape. And now, one night last week in Simpson's Rockingham estate, here was O. J. Simpson, in what might be called different circumstances, dressed in black tie and sipping champagne, trying to get all that messy stuff behind him.Outside the house, a fund-raiser for an L.A. anti-violence group was going on -- an affair critics derided as tastelessly hypocritical, as if the Menendez brothers were raising money for an orphanage. Inside, O.J. was talking to two NEWSWEEK reporters. ""I'm not a big fan of NEWSWEEK,'' he said at first, but then,...
  • The Nutty Career

    REGRETS, HE'S HAD A FEW, but fewer than you'd think. ""I regret not making "Ghostbusters','' says Eddie Murphy, 35. It's a Sunday evening in San Francisco, a couple of weeks before the release of his new comedy, ""The Nutty Professor.'' The actor's on the set of ""Metro,'' sporting baby dreadlocks and a small hoop earring, and lounging in a trailer full of peach-scented candles. ""We had just finished "Trading Places','' Murphy remembers, ""and Dan said, "How about making a movie about fighting ghosts?' I was like, I ain't f-ing with no ghosts. Then I saw it and'' -- he throws up his hands and lets out a high-pitched scream -- ""I wanted to jump off the roof.'' He also regrets not singing on ""We Are the World.'' ""Stevie asked me to come to the studio,'' he says, ""but I was working on my own album and blew it off. I was like, They'll probably put me in the back row with LaToya and Sonny Bono anyway. Then I saw the video and'' -- again with the hands and the scream -- ""I wanted to...