Stories by Andrew Nagorski

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    Angela Merkel Speaks Truth to Multiculturalism

    When Chancellor Angela Merkel said multiculturalism in Germany has “utterly failed,” the commentariat revolt was swift, and way off the mark. Merkel was accused of pandering to her right-wing constituency and lurching right in the face of rising anti-Muslim sentiment. Unjustly accused, she has delivered a refreshing, no-nonsense message that Germany, and other Western nations, should take to heart.
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    Lee Myung-bak: the Reagan of Seoul

    Don’t be fooled by the recent signs of a thaw between the Koreas. Pyongyang and Seoul have discussed more family reunions on the divided peninsula, and $8.5 million in aid from the South to help the North cope with devastating floods.
  • After the Crash, What's Next for Poland?

    President Kaczynski's visit to Russia was supposed to help heal a historic rift between the two countries. But as NEWSWEEK's former Warsaw bureau chief explains, that won't be easy. Especially now.
  • And Justice for None

    A gripping new thriller examines the fungible concepts of innocence and guilt in Stalinist Russia.
  • Russia’s New Normal

    The Cold War may be over, but that doesn't mean the threat from the Kremlin has entirely disappeared.
  • Putin’s Scary Side

    Vladimir Putin presided over a much-thawed Russia, but his strong-arm tactics hearkened back to the days of Stalin.
  • Tales From The Crypt

    Recently released documents from the Soviet archives reveal a wealth of buried atrocities.
  • Declassifying the Kremlin

    A book of declassified documents reveals Stalin and his successors as trigger-happy liars who never saw a fact they couldn't twist.
  • Stalin’s Tipping Point

    By mid-October 1941, most of Moscow’s residents were convinced that their city was about to be overrun by the Germans. The NKVD, as the Soviet secret police was then called, had prepared the first of what promised to be a series of pamphlets. “Comrades! We left Moscow due to the continuous attacks of the Germans,” it declared. “But it’s not the right time for us to weep.” The “Underground Party Committee” that signed the statement vowed that Moscow would be liberated. Since the city held out in the end, this admission of defeat was ultimately buried in the NKVD’s classified files rather than distributed. In fact, much of the story of how close Moscow came to falling—a defeat that would likely have transformed the course of the war—has been obscured by decades of deliberately distorted history. Now it’s a story that can be told.The battle for Moscow, which officially lasted from Sept. 30, 1941, to April 20, 1942, pitted two gargantuan armies against each other in what was the...
  • Long Memory

    Plenty of central European writers have been obsessed with the theme of human memory. The poems of the late Polish Nobel Prize winner Czeslaw Milosz, the prose of Czech émigré Milan Kundera and the writings of countless others have focused on, as Kundera put it, how "ultimately everyone lets everything be forgotten."No one fought harder against that than Ryszard Kapuscinski, the Polish journalist turned literary superstar who died in January at 74. And nowhere is this more explicit than in his 2004 book "Travels With Herodotus" (275 pages. Alfred A. Knopf), now published in English for the first time. Like many of his works, this is a collage of sorts, part travel writing, part self-reflection. But as befits a work that feels almost like a last testament, it's far more of the latter. He describes how in his travels he took along Herodotus' "The Histories," snatching it up as soon as a Polish translation was available during the post-Stalinist thaw in 1955. He views the Greek who...
  • Long Memory

    Plenty of central European writers have been obsessed with the theme of human memory. The poems of the late Polish Nobel Prize winner Czeslaw Milosz, the prose of Czech émigré Milan Kundera and the writings of countless others have focused on, as Kundera put it, how "ultimately everyone lets everything be forgotten."No one fought harder against that than Ryszard Kapuscinski, the Polish journalist turned literary superstar who died in January at 74. And nowhere is this more explicit than in his 2004 book "Travels With Herodotus" (275 pages. Alfred A. Knopf), now published in English for the first time. Like many of his works, this is a collage of sorts, part travel writing, part self-reflection. But as befits a work that feels almost like a last testament, it's far more of the latter. He describes how in his travels he took along Herodotus' "The Histories," snatching it up as soon as a Polish translation was available during the post-Stalinist thaw in 1955. He views the Greek who...
  • A Kapuscinski Valedictory

    Plenty of Central European writers have been obsessed with the theme of human memory. The poems of the late Polish Nobel Prize winner Czeslaw Milosz, the prose of Czech émigré Milan Kundera and the writings of countless others have focused on, as Kundera put it, how "ultimately everyone lets everything be forgotten."No one fought harder against that than Ryszard Kapuscinski, the Polish journalist turned literary superstar who died last January at age 74. And nowhere is this more explicit than in his last book, "Travels with Herodotus." Like many of his works, this is a collage of sorts, part travel writing, part self-reflection. But as befits a work that feels almost like a last testament, it's far more of the latter. He describes how in his travels he took along Herodotus' "The Histories," snatching it up as soon as a Polish translation was available during the post-Stalinist thaw in 1955. He views the Greek who lived in the fifth century B.C. as his role model, someone who set out...
  • Troublesome Twins

    They are, quite simply, the twins--and identical ones, at that--who now rule Poland. Elected president last fall, Lech Kaczynski swore in his brother Jaroslaw as prime minister last week, stripping away any pretense that anyone else is in charge. That's not all that's been stripped away, however. Only recently applauded as New Europe's biggest success story, Poland before last year's elections was emerging as a key new player within NATO and the EU, sending troops to Iraq and leading the European effort to support the Orange Revolution in neighboring Ukraine. Now it's mostly seen as a problem country, and increasingly, the twins are seen as the biggest problem of all.Last fall, Jaroslaw assured voters he wouldn't take the job of prime minister if his party won, since he didn't want to jeopardize Lech's chances of winning the presidency. He also led voters to believe he would form a government with the liberal-leaning Civic Platform. Instead he joined his Law and Justice Party with...

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