Andrew Nagorski

Stories by Andrew Nagorski

  • Nuremberg Revisited

    We should be a lot wiser now. We've seen ex-communist nations grapple with the legacy of decades of wholesale repression, and the workings of truth commissions in Argentina, Chile and South Africa. Toss in mass murder in Cambodia, Rwanda and elsewhere, factor in the possibility that Slobodan Milosevic may eventually end up on trial in The Hague, and we certainly have many more atrocities to ponder than we did in 1961 when the star-studded film "Judgment at Nuremberg" hit the screens. The movie examines the Allied trials of top Nazi officials, the first modern attempt to punish those responsible for "crimes against humanity." ...
  • Revisiting A Massacre

    ;Nothing could have prepared the 1,600 Jews in Jedwabne, a town in northeast Poland, for the hell of their final days in the summer of 1941. At first they were attacked, tortured, stoned and clubbed as they were murdered individually or in small groups. Seeing the killers approaching, two young mothers drowned their babies in a pond rather than surrender them--and then drowned themselves. One man was knifed, and his tongue and eyes were cut out while he was still alive. A young woman's head was cut off and kicked around. Finally, the remaining Jews--men, women, children--were herded into a barn, which was doused with kerosene and torched. ...
  • Hold The French Fries

    I loved the symbolism of the opening of the first McDonald's in Moscow in 1990--and the sight of the monstrous crush of Russians patiently lining up to taste their first Big Mac. The new restaurant on Pushkin Square offered everything that the old communist system failed to deliver: cleanliness, courteous service and affordable meals for the masses. Communism was dead, capitalism had triumphed and everyone was entering the new age of globalization. But today I feel sheepish about my earlier unabashed enthusiasm. Fast-food outlets have proliferated all over the former Soviet bloc as the giant chains have rushed to dominate new markets, and their unrelenting expansion--McDonald's now has 28,700 outlets in 120 countries--looks more troubling than inspiring.Just read the new book "Fast Food Nation" by American journalist Eric Schlosser to discover why the backlash to this early catalyst of globalization is on the rise. According to Schlosser, "the fast-food industry embodies the best...
  • The Buzz On Bush In Davos

    Maybe Davos is just mesmerized by the man nobody knows. At last year's meeting of the World Economic Forum in the Swiss Alpine resort, the mystery man was Russia's Vladimir Putin. In conference sessions, over lunches and dinners, in the corridors, the buzz among the participants was all about the new Russian president. This year the buzz is all about George W. Bush. Although no members of the new administration are present, W hovers in the air like the green laser e-mail messages that a Swiss telecom start-up is beaming in the evenings on a Davos mountainside for everyone to see. Which is hardly surprising. As the new president conceded recently: "I can imagine there's a lot of anxiety about a fellow coming out of Texas. They don't know me from Adam."So what's the buzz on Bush among the top businessmen, politicians and pundits gathered here? Surprisingly complicated. Yes, the snickering still resonates in the background--the kind of snickering that prompted London's Daily Mail to...
  • MIRROR, MIRROR ON THE WALL...

    It's more than fitting that Bill Clinton announced recently that he won't make a trip to North Korea before leaving office, explaining that time was too short to hammer out an agreement to curtail that country's missile program. Yes, last year produced extraordinary breakthroughs: the June summit in Pyongyang between North Korea's Kim Jong Il and South Korea's Kim Dae Jung, and U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright's visit in October. But Washington sees--and, undoubtedly, under a Bush administration will continue to see--North Korea as a dangerous, isolated, unpredictable state, at least until it has backed off its missile-development program and exports to nations like Libya. More significantly, North Korea's political future remains as shrouded in mystery and guesswork as ever. The two Kims pledged their countries to "independently resolve the issue of national unification." Whatever that means.You'd think that, after watching so many communist regimes collapse, all of us...
  • Time To Put Up Or Shut Up

    European Union leaders who assembled in Nice last weekend should have been flattered. They were greeted by the protest community with the same kind of outrage that marked last year's World Trade Organization gathering in Seattle and the World Bank and International Monetary Fund summit in Prague in September. A similar disparate collection of protesters--everyone from Basque separatists to anti-globalization crusaders--fought with the police, hurled rocks and smeared storefronts with their graffiti. What's flattering about this rowdy welcome is the protesters' belief that the EU is one of the mighty institutions that threaten them. In other words, it has the strength and will to take decisions that will shape the future of Europe and the world. Which makes it one of the big players, a superpower in its own right.That's a premature judgment, at best. The plain fact is that the EU is a long way from wielding the kind of clout that the protesters ascribe to it. It's not simply a matter...
  • Eager Voters, Odd Choices

    Corneliu Vadim Tudor looks and sounds like a freakish parody. The former "court poet" of Romanian communist dictator Nicolae Ceausescu, "the Genius of the Carpathians" who was toppled and executed in 1989, Tudor reinvented himself as the leader of the far-right Greater Romania Party. Dressed in white suits and lilac-tinted sunglasses, he rails against crime and corruption, claiming that the country can "only be run with machine guns." He carries around a list of 180 prominent Romanians whom he brands as "traitors who must be liquidated." His publications talk about "dirty Jews" and "criminal Gypsies." True, he dialed back on his extremist rhetoric recently, proclaiming "I hate fascism and Nazism." But it's still extraordinary that Tudor came in a strong second in Romania's presidential elections last week, sending him into a runoff against former president and ex-communist Ion Iliescu this Sunday.Or is it? While the United States is demonstrating how messy elections can become even...
  • The Football Election

    Europeans, and everybody else who lives by the rules of parliamentary systems, have long learned to live with messy election outcomes. On Oct. 3, 1999, Austrians went to the polls, and it wasn't until February of this year that two of the leading three parties worked out an agreement to form a new coalition government. But life goes on, no matter how long such dramas take to play themselves out, and even if the final outcome seems more like an accident than a reflection of the true wishes of the voters.Could there be a lesson in this for Americans trying to cope with their first truly messy presidential election results in more than a century? Yes, but don't bet on them taking the lesson to heart. It's not just that Americans are accustomed to learning on election night, or at least by the following morning, who the clear-cut winners and losers are. The real difference comes down to the contrast between people who are raised on baseball and those who grew up with football--not...
  • A Callous View Of Human Life

    Five years ago, I accompanied several former Soviet political prisoners as they revisited a part of the infamous Gulag--the labor camps near Perm in the Urals, where they had spent many excruciating years. Near Perm-35, one of the most notorious camps that was still operational, our bus stopped at a makeshift cemetery. It was a sorry sight. Crude wooden markers had tumbled into tall weeds, and those that were standing bore only a number, not a name--the ultimate sign of how a prisoner became anonymous, invisible. The survivors stood there silently, each realizing that one of those markers could have been his. They, too, could have disappeared without a trace, or at most recalled by a numbered post.It's a measure of how much Russia has changed that the entire country is reliving the tragedy of the Kursk because a note was found on the body of Lt. Capt. Dmitry Kolesnikov. Thanks to the media that haven't yet buckled under government pressure, the submariners haven't slipped silently...
  • Collaborators And Heroes

    Imagine that the time is 1942, the place is Nazi-occupied Europe. In your Polish town, a Jewish neighbor knocks on your door seeking refuge. If you take him in and he's discovered, the Germans will kill not just you and him, but also your wife and children, along with anyone else living in your house. Or imagine you're a resistance fighter with an ideal opportunity to shoot a German soldier. You'll escape, but the local villagers will pay the price for your action--a very high price. According to Nazi racial theory, the number of people to be shot in retaliation for the death of a German soldier varied according to nationality. In Denmark, the occupiers executed five civilians; the equivalent number for France was 10, for Poland it was 100, and for the Balkans it was even higher. Finally, imagine you're the leader of a Jewish Council in a ghetto, and the Germans have presented you with an ultimatum: send the Jewish police to round up 5,000 Jews for deportation. If you refuse, they...
  • The Polish-Russian Gap

    A very old joke from the iciest days of the cold war tells the story of a Frenchman and a Russian traveling in opposite directions on the Moscow-Paris train. Along the way, both trains stop in Warsaw. The Frenchman gets off, looks around and asks: "Is this Moscow?" Stepping off the other train, the Russian asks: "Is this Paris?" The joke wasn't so much about the Stalinist architecture that is still on display in the center of Warsaw amid a proliferation of sleek new office buildings, but about the different perceptions of the atmosphere. To the Frenchman, it smacked of repression, bleakness and deprivation. To the Russian, it offered a whiff of relative freedom, color and opportunity.I'm just back from a trip to Russia and Poland and, believe me, that joke is long dead and forgotten. Not because a Russian couldn't mistake Warsaw for Paris, at least in terms of the smell of freedom. But because, by the same criterion, Warsaw in no way resembles Moscow. I've lived and worked in both...
  • Back Home In Gun Country

    In nearly twenty years as a foreign correspondent, I heard some variant of the same question again and again: "What gives with you crazy Americans?" The context could be the latest indictment of alleged American political and cultural imperialism abroad, or of the sins of racism, poverty and violence at home. Fueled by a combination of resentment and envy, the charges were often contradictory (Why does the United States always meddle in other people's business? Why hasn't it intervened to save the day in country X?). I was usually ready to deal with those kinds of questions. Even when it came to the death penalty, I believed, there were ways to explain American attitudes, to demonstrate that the controversy isn't as simple as it looks from the outside. But one issue had me stumped: guns. Now that I've moved back to the United States, it still does. Like many Europeans, Asians and others, I just don't get the American obsession with guns.Granted, the view from abroad on this issue is...
  • A Europe 'With One Voice'?

    "Quo vadis Europa?" German Foreign Minister Joschka Fischer, the ex-'60s radical and leader of the Greens, asked in a remarkable speech at Berlin's Humboldt University recently. Claiming that he wasn't making an official government declaration but merely speaking his mind "as a staunch European and German parliamentarian," he insisted there could be only one answer to the question of where Europe is heading: "onwards to the completion of European integration." Fischer called for the transformation of the European Union into a genuine federation, with a new constitution that would establish a European parliament with real powers and a directly elected European president. At a time when the 15-member EU is contemplating a huge expansion eastward, he posited that only a core group of countries is likely to be part of this federation at first. But he effectively revived the almost forgotten notion of a United States of Europe, which would gradually encompass more and more members.Hold...
  • Rolling Back The Iron Curtain

    Shortly after the collapse of the Soviet Union in late 1991, I had a chance encounter with a top aide to Russia's firebrand, ultranationalist politician Vladimir Zhirinovsky. When the aide realized he was sitting next to an American correspondent, he looked nonplused at first, then suddenly inspired. "I have to congratulate your President Bush and his CIA," he declared. "For what?" I asked. "For the absolutely masterful way that they brought about the downfall of the Soviet Union." I laughed. "I'd like to think that the CIA was capable of pulling this off, but I have my doubts," I said. "No, no," the aide insisted. "It was all your CIA's doing."Two books on the early days of the cold war now provide new ammunition for the conspiracy theorists. Based in part on recently declassified documents, "Operation Rollback" by Peter Grose and "Undermining the Kremlin" by Gregory Mitrovich offer compelling evidence that the United States wasted no time in launching covert operations against the...
  • The Perils Of Peacekeeping

    Iri Dienstbier has the disturbing habit of speaking his mind. That's why, when I visited him in the 1980s in communist Czechoslovakia, the former journalist-turned-dissident stoked furnaces for a living. That's why, when Vaclav Havel named him the first foreign minister in a newly free government, he never learned the diplomatic art of obfuscation. And that's why, when he recently presented his conclusions on Kosovo as the special rapporteur of the U.N. Commission on Human Rights, he was uncompromisingly blunt. A year after NATO's air war over Kosovo, he declared, the peacekeeping mission there has failed "to achieve a single goal: neither security for people nor freedom of movement, not to mention creating conditions for the development of democratic institutions in a multiethnic society." Driving his message home, he added: "The bombing hasn't solved any problems. It only multiplied the existing problems and created new ones."This is a message Western leaders don't want to hear-...
  • 'There's No End Of History'

    Niklas Frank, a veteran journalist long interested in human rights, exudes the aura of a man who would never willfully harm or speak ill of anyone. But Niklas is also the son of Hans Frank, the Nazi governor general of Poland. His father oversaw a death machine that killed a total of 6 million Poles, 3 million of whom were Jews. Niklas last saw his father in a Nuremberg prison, where he was held until he was hanged as a war criminal on Oct. 16, 1946. Describing the condemned man as "a monster," he told me: "I'm against the death penalty, but I believe my father's execution was totally justified." As a longtime foreign correspondent, I had heard many startling statements, but never one like that about a father. When I look back at my just concluded three and one-half years as NEWSWEEK's Berlin bureau chief, I often think of my meeting with Niklas Frank. Especially his words that went far beyond his family history: "There isn't a day when I don't think about my father and everything...
  • What Did Kohl Know And When Did He Know It?

    The time was August 1991, the place an Italian restaurant in a shopping center in the Swiss town of St. Margrethen, near the German border. At the Toscana Trattoria, an arms dealer handed over a metal suitcase containing more than $500,000 in cash to Walther Leisler Kiep--the treasurer of Chancellor Helmut Kohl's Christian Democratic Union. Karlheinz Schreiber, the German-Canadian arms dealer, who is now fighting extradition from Canada to Germany on tax-evasion charges, described the transaction as a "totally normal contribution to party finances." But that and other contributions went into secret CDU bank accounts whose existence were reluctantly confirmed by Kohl himself last week. As the German Parliament voted to probe these murky dealings, the former chancellor found himself under more intense fire than at any time during his 16 years in office. "Oh, stop it," he snapped at reporters hounding him about the scandal last week.Good luck. Parliament has a whole host of questions,...
  • The Nowhere Man

    Sometimes it seems Gerhard Schroder is working out his inner political conflicts in public. One moment he's announcing the end of the era of "the omnipotent and interventionist state." Then without missing a beat, he's defending the benevolent virtues of "Rhineland capitalism" and handing out government loans and guarantees to rescue Philipp Holzmann, a badly mismanaged--and nearly bankrupt--construction giant. One day the German chancellor is joining Britain's Tony Blair "to promote the concepts of efficiency, competition and high performance." Another day he's declaring that his government will fight the hostile takeover of a major German company by a British "predator," and issuing dire warnings that "private speculation can ruin an entire economy." Is this the New Middle, or the New Muddle?More than a year after taking office, Schroder is all over the political map--left, right and center. He's everywhere. Which also means he's nowhere. "This is a problem," concedes one aide,...
  • A Bumper Crop Of Despair

    By their country's standards, Jerzy and Katarzyna Pekala appear to be model farmers. That's exactly what makes their situation so worrisome. On paper they're succeeding in a way most Polish farmers can only dream of. Their 87-hectare spread, 150 kilometers north of Warsaw, is about 10 times the size of the average farm in Poland. They keep some 450 pigs, and they raise wheat on an additional 100 hectares leased from a disbanded state farm nearby. They even own a small general store where their neighbors come to shop and chat.But the Pekalas are scared. In recent years Jerzy, 41, has been treated for severe depression and Katarzyna, 39, has grown increasingly embittered as the couple has struggled with the farm's worsening debts. Because of heavily subsidized imports from the European Union, the Pekalas say, hog prices have plunged roughly 50 percent in the past two years, and wheat prices haven't fared much better. "Our costs keep rising and our prices keep dropping," Jerzy says. ...
  • Behind The Wall's Fall

    In most people's memories, the images are as vivid today as they were on Nov. 9, 1989: jubilant Germans surging through the Berlin wall, the ultimate symbol of the division of Europe. It's a moment Berlin aims to recapture next week with a lavish 10th-anniversary commemoration. Floodlights and fireworks will illuminate the path that the wall took through the city, culminating in a celebration near the Brandenburg Gate. The Russian cellist Mstislav Rostropovich, who welcomed East Germans with a solo performance at the wall a decade ago, will be back, conducting 160 cellists this time. At a gala dinner at the rebuilt Adlon Hotel next door, the three heads of state at the center of the drama, Mikhail Gorbachev, Helmut Kohl and George Bush, will be guests of honor.A decade later, the collapse of communism looks like a preordained script: Solidarity's triumph in Poland in June; Hungary's decision to open its border with Austria in the summer, allowing East Germans to begin a stampede...
  • Deep-Frozen Assets

    The contrast couldn't be more stark. The hotels, spas and restaurants of Finland's far north are jammed almost all year, with vacationers and fishermen in summer and fall, and more vacationers and skiers during the long winter. Just across the Russian border, nothing is the same except the ruggedly scenic Arctic terrain. A desolate road traverses a wilderness that was off-limits during the Soviet era and remains uninhabited. The first Russian village, 160 kilometers from the Finnish border, is Upper Tuloma. Many inhabitants survive by selling wild berries; some earn a few rubles by scavenging electrical wires and fixtures from power pylons. "This is the biggest income gap across any border in Europe," says Lassi Heininen, a Finnish political scientist at the University of Lapland's Arctic Center.Finland hopes to span that chasm. On Nov. 12 the Finns, who hold the European Union's rotating presidency, will convene a foreign ministers' meeting in Helsinki on the "Northern Dimension"...
  • Memoirs Of An Ex-Friend

    For a while, they were the social Democrats' dynamic duo. Campaigning last year to oust Helmut Kohl, Gerhard Schroder wooed Germany's wary business community with a low-tax, get-government-off-your-back gospel. Party boss Oskar Lafontaine, meantime, preached tax-and-spend rhetoric to the trade unions and other leftist groups that formed the SPD's traditional base. Were they at odds? Not at all, they said; just sharing the campaign workload. "We are so close that you couldn't fit a sheet of paper between us," Lafontaine declared.Well, how about a 320-page book? Lafontaine's "The Heart Beats on the Left," serialized last week, drops all pretense of closeness. Not that much remained. From the moment Schroder became chancellor, it was clear he would have to marginalize old-school leftists like Lafontaine if he intended to wrench his party to the center. Fed up and angry, Lafontaine abruptly withdrew from politics last March, giving up his posts as party chairman and Finance minister,...
  • A Victory For Principles

    As NATO's secretary-general, Javier Solana has presided over momentous changes in the alliance: accepting Poland, the Czech Republic and Hungary as the first new members from the former Soviet bloc; establishing a new consultative relationship with Russia, and, of course, launching an air war against Serb forces in Kosovo. In late October, the 57-year-old Spaniard will become the EU's High Representative for foreign and security policy in an effort to provide Europe with a stronger, more unified voice on security issues. In New York last week, Solana talked with NEWSWEEK's Andrew Nagorski. Excerpts: ...
  • Breaking Down In Berlin

    Gerhard Schroder has a problem. Several problems, in fact. German voters are increasingly fed up with his government's performance. The chancellor says things will improve once his economic austerity plan is in place: "I am convinced that our policies are the right ones," he told the Bundestag last week. "And I am also convinced that the results will be felt by the public and then also in elections." But first he has to get his policies enacted.Problem No. 1: he can't count on all his colleagues in the Social Democratic Party. Schroder has never been popular with the SPD's far left, which much preferred ex-party chairman and finance minister Oskar Lafontaine. Schroder got rid of Lafontaine early in his administration. Leftists have balked at supporting the Chancellor's budget-cutting package. "We want to make clear that we will not vote for the reforms in parliament unless the cutbacks are spread to everybody's shoulders," declared Detlev von Larcher, although some of his colleagues...
  • The Jewish Priest

    It was 1943, in German-occupied Swieciany, a town that belonged to Poland before World War II and is part of Lithuania today. A Jewish mother frantically asked an illiterate Polish Catholic woman to take her newborn baby. Discovery, the Catholic woman knew, would mean execution. But she was childless, and swayed by the mother's desperate logic. "Save this Jewish baby in the name of the Jew you believe in," she said. "When the child grows up, he'll become a priest." True to that prophecy, Romuald Waszkinel became a priest in 1966. For the last 28 years, he has taught philosophy at the Catholic University in the eastern Polish city of Lublin.Last week Polish and German leaders commemorated the 60th anniversary of Germany's invasion of Poland that started World War II, but the war keeps springing new surprises on the survivors. Waszkinel is one of many hidden children in Poland who have learned their true identities only as adults. Waszkinel began pressing his mother about his...
  • Berlin's Fresh Faces

    At 33, Hans Martin Bury represents a new breed of Germans. Instead of a hike in the Black Forest, his idea of a good time is scuba diving in Mauritius or Costa Rica. Unlike the older generation of politicians who steadily expanded the welfare state, he's convinced the state has to do less and small entrepreneurs need more leeway to do more--even if that means less security. "The first goal of the young isn't to go into the public sector or to join a big company," he says. "They understand that the flip side of risk is opportunity." But Bury, who was first elected to the Bundestag as a Social Democrat when he was only 24, hasn't had time to go scuba diving this summer. Last month Chancellor Gerhard Schroder appointed Bury a minister on his staff. Bury's job: pushing through a highly unpopular austerity program aimed at stimulating economic growth. The program aims to reduce the national budget by $16 billion a year, cut taxes and downsize the welfare state. "If we stick to this...
  • Remembering The Wire Cutters

    Quick, rerun the images of Central Europe in 1989 in your mind and what do you see? Certainly the charismatic shipyard electrician Lech Walesa, the workers' hero who exploded the myth of the workers' state, leading the Solidarity delegation to the round-table negotiations with the embattled Polish communist leadership and then to a stunning victory at the polls. Or perhaps the joyous crowds on Prague's Wenceslas Square greeting Alexander Dubcek, back from his long political exile, and dissident playwright Vaclav Havel, soon to become Czechoslovakia's philosopher king. And, of course--from those pictures seared in everyone's memory--Germans celebrating atop the Berlin wall on the night of Nov. 9, when this ultimate symbol of a divided continent broke wide open.But there's usually a glaring omission: Hungary's dismantling of the barbed-wire fences on its border with Austria that year. On June 27, Hungarian Foreign Minister Gyula Horn and his Austrian counterpart Alois Mock took up...
  • Reopening Old Wounds

    The accusations, filed in a New York City court in June, couldn't have been blunter. Lawyers representing 11 American and British Jews seeking the return of family property in Poland claimed the Holocaust took place in Poland because of the Poles. "Germany took advantage of the anti-Semitic climate in Poland by locating the notorious death camps there," the class-action suit maintained. After the end of the war, Poland pursued "ethnic and racial cleansing" to seize and profit from Jewish property. Violence against Jews was "part of a systematic scheme to wipe out all traces of the Jewish race," the lawyers concluded.The Jewish experience in Poland has long been a sensitive topic. And since the country's largest daily, Gazeta Wyborcza, published the full text of the lawsuit earlier this month, the debate has sparked again. This time, though, many Polish and foreign Jews have rallied to Poland's defense. Not that they deny the case for Polish Jews and Catholics who had their property...
  • The Freedom To Shop

    As she strolls through Berlin's vast Kaufhof department store, browsing down the aisles of women's hosiery, Sabine Konig radiates an aura of adventure. The 35-year-old office worker doesn't really need new stockings. She's here in the name of freedom--and to do something that been forbidden here all her life: go shopping on Sunday. "This is terrific," she declares. "I don't have any special purchases in mind. I just wanted to show up to support this." Customers throughout the store share Konig's sense of liberation. Peter Hermann is examining a display of luggage on sale. "The politicians and the unions are against this," the high-school teacher says of the store's decision to defy the national law against operating on Sunday. "But the people are for it." A decade after the Berlin wall's collapse, a grass-roots revolt is once again sweeping the city. Before it's done, the whole country may be changed forever.Until recently, law-abiding Germans didn't shop on Sunday--even in...
  • The Improbable Dream

    On a visit to Slovenia last week, Bill Clinton told a cheering rain-soaked crowd that the tiny ex-Yugoslav republic should serve as a role model for Serbia. But if they loved the praise, most in the audience doubted that Serbia would follow the Slovene path. "I don't think it's possible," said financial analyst Andrea Peterca. "Slovenia is too different from Serbia."She's got a point. Tucked in the northern corner of the former Yugoslavia between the Alps and the Adriatic, this nation of 2 million inhabitants has more in common with its Austrian and Italian neighbors than with the chaotic region to its south. "We never felt ourselves to be part of the Balkans," says Silvester Pilsak, a Web designer who braved the rain to see Clinton. With a per capita income of about $11,000, Slovenia can already claim relative affluence and a solid democratic system. It's also largely ethnically homogeneous and lives in peace with everyone. The contrasts with Serbia couldn't be greater. And yet...
  • A New Job For Solana

    Nato secretary-general Javier Solana likes to joke that he keeps Nordic hours in the morning and Spanish hours in the evening. In other words, the 56-year-old Spaniard is a workaholic, and never more so than during the war over Kosovo. At 3 a.m. recently, a member of the U.S. delegation to NATO was startled to receive a call from a Solana aide. Solana had asked the aide to find out how Washington was reacting to the day's events--and report back immediately. "He's got one of the toughest jobs in the world right now," says one NATO diplomat. ...
  • 'Hitler's Offspring'

    Frederick Kempe opens his book "Father/Land: A Personal Search for the New Germany" with the lies he once spread about his father. Kempe told boyhood buddies in Utah that his dad grew up in Germany but came to America and fought for Uncle Sam against the Nazis. Why, Dad was even decorated as an American war hero for injuries suffered at the Battle of the Bulge! The truth was that Kempe's father had served as an Army cook in Virginia, but the real story "wasn't dramatic enough to separate me sufficiently from my German roots," writes Kempe in "Father/Land" (G.P. Putnam's Sons). ...