Andrew Nagorski

Stories by Andrew Nagorski

  • Going From Jazz To Riches

    Three years ago, Andrzej Gasiorowski was a doctor making $30 a month in southern Poland. Boguslaw Bagsik was an elementary-school music teacher earning even less. Then they discovered they shared a love of jazz--and capitalist ambition. Starting in 1989, Gasiorowski, 32, and Bagsik, 28, formed one of the most extraordinary business empires in Eastern Europe. The firm, Art B (for "artistic business"), rocketed into the stratosphere of high finance, reporting profits of $30 million on revenues of $300 million last year. ...
  • Sleeping Without The Enemy

    During the four decades of communist rule in Eastern Europe, film directors cursed, confronted and conspired to outmaneuver their censors--often brilliantly. Despite or perhaps precisely because of the oppressive political climate, artists like Poland's Andrzej Wajda and Krzysztof Zanussi, Czechoslovakia's Milos Forman and Jiri Menzel and Hungary's Istvan Szabo and Miklos Jansco electrified audiences with their mix of realism, surrealist metaphor and piercing, sometimes outrageously funny satire. Movies were both a release and an essential part of the broader political struggle. But now that struggle is over, and many of the victors are curiously adrift. "When you can talk about anything, what do you talk about?" asks Polish screenwriter Maciej Karpinski. ...
  • 'This Is Just The Beginning'

    The casualty toll was high - two dead and scores wounded - but as students in Belgrade ended five days of street demonstrations last week, they were jubilant. Singing "Give Peace a Chance" and "Age of Aquarius," they savored their triumph. Confronted by the massive protests, Slobodan Milosevic - the Communist president of Serbia, Yugoslavia's largest republic - acceded to most of the student demands. The Serbian authorities released nearly all the opposition leaders and students who were arrested during the demonstrations, fired media officials responsible for slanting the news and made the interior minister offer his resignation. "The next step must be more freedom, up till the final victory of democracy in Serbia," proclaimed opposition leader Vuk Draskovic after he was released from prison. "This is just the beginning." ...
  • Neither Ally Nor Enemy

    We have no eternal allies, and we have no perpetual enemies," Lord Palmerston said in the House of Commons in 1848. "Our interests are eternal and perpetual." In their dealings with Soviet leaders, Americans have generally disregarded that cynical but sound advice. We swing from one extreme to another, from false hopes to angry disappointment. At one moment, we see an eternal friend; at another, a perpetual enemy. Now more than ever, the Soviet Union is neither-and we need to do better in identifying our permanent interests. ...