Andrew Romano

Stories by Andrew Romano

  • The Stumper Superdelegate Watch, Part III of ???

    Click through for parts one and two. Remember the secret stash of 50 superdelegates that Barack Obama was supposed to roll out after his March 4 losses to Hillary Clinton in Texas and Ohio? Um, nevermind. On Tuesday morning, NBC News anchor emeritus Tom BrokawThe only problem? There's no surprise in store, according to the Obama campaign. "This is just a rumor," says Obama spokesman Bill Burton today. "There is no secret stash of superdelegates that we are sitting on waiting to roll out." Maybe the stockpile splintered after Tuesday's losses; maybe Team Obama wants to release its names as a steady drip rather than a sudden flood; or maybe the whole story was a sham. Either way, no game-changers this week....
  • The Filter: March, 6 2008

    A round-up of this morning's must-read stories.DEMS FACE A LONG BRAWL(John F. Harris and Jim VandeHei, Politico)For months, Democrats have congratulated themselves on an embarrassment...
  • Expertinent: Is Obama Doomed in Pennsylvania?

    Next stop, Pennsylvania. From now until April 22--that's seven straight weeks--the diverse, delegate-rich and potentially decisive Keystone State will be ground zero in the epic 2008 Democratic contest."It could be like Iowa on steroids," said state Democratic Party...
  • An Obama-Clinton Ticket?

    How will it all end?With wins in Texas, Ohio and Rhode Island, the momentum this morning may belong to Hillary Clinton. But thanks to Democratic Party's gratuitously fair system, the delegate count barely changed after last night's white-knuckle victories--meaning the math still favors Barack Obama. Unless 30 percent of his superdelegates vanish, 30 percent of his pledged delegates defect and Clinton wins 60 percent of the remaining primary and caucus delegates, it's all-but-certain that he'll maintain his 150-delegate lead at the end of voting. No one doubts that Clinton will keep campaigning--at least through Pennsylvania on April 22, if not the Denver convention in late August. But it's still pretty tough to see a way--short of some serious superdelegate arm-twisting--for her to battle back to the White House.Unless, of course, she battles back as second in command.Vice President Clinton. I've always thought this hypothetical was a little loony; the...
  • The Filter: March 5, 2008

    A round-up of this morning's must-read stories.THE RESULTSDemocratsTexas (p): Clinton 51; Obama 48Texas (c): Obama 52; Clinton 48 (with 35 percent counted)Ohio: Clinton 54; Obama 44Rhode Island: Clinton 58; Obama 40Vermont: Obama 60; Clinton 38RepublicansTexas: McCain 51; Huckabee 38; Paul 5Ohio: McCain 60; Huckabee 31; Paul 5Rhode Island: McCain 65; Huckabee 22; Paul 7Vermont: McCain 72; Huckabee 14; Paul 7Obama has won 26 contests and Clinton has won 17 ('contests' counts D.C., territories, Democrats Abroad). Obama has won 23 actual states and she has won 16.  BIG WINS IN TEXAS AND OHIO FOR CLINTON; MCCAIN IS IN AS GOP CHOICE(Adam Nagourney, New York Times)Mrs. Clinton also won Rhode Island, while Mr. Obama won in Vermont. But...
  • After D-Day: Hillary Clinton

    Final Ohio Polling Average: First Place, 50.1 percent (7.1 ahead of Obama)Final Texas Polling Average: First Place, 47.4 percent (1.7 ahead of Obama)Current National Polling Average: Second Place, 42.5 percent (5.3 behind Obama) Good news for Clintonites, bad news for Haters--it looks like Hillary is sticking around at least a little while longer. Simply...
  • After D-Day: Barack Obama

    Final Ohio Polling Average: Second Place, 43.0 percent (7.1 behind Clinton)Final Texas Polling Average: Second Place, 45.7 percent (1.7 behind Clinton)Current National Polling Average: First Place, 47.3 percent (4.3 ahead of Clinton)...
  • Decision Day: Comeback Gal or Knockout Punch?

    Or, you know, neither.Finally. After two long, unendurable weeks with no caucuses or primaries--how did I even pass the time?--the day has come. As we speak/type/read, the voters of Texas, Ohio, Rhode Island and Vermont are already heading to the polls to cast their votes for Hillary Clinton, Barack Obama, John McCain, Mike Huckabee or Ron Paul (yes, he's still kicking). Huzzah. On the Republican side of the aisle, the stakes aren't particularly high. If McCain wins 172 of the day's 256 delegates, he'll clinch the nomination; if not, he may have to wait a week (for Mississippi) or a month (for Pennsylvania). Either way, he's the nominee. Sorry, Huck. As for the Democrats... well, you've probably heard that there's a little something riding on today's results. With wins in Texas and Ohio, Obama could deal Clinton a death blow. On the other hand, a Clinton sweep would kick start (yet another) Comeback Gal narrative and extend the contest at...
  • Obama's Credibility Gap?

     First there was Watergate. Then came Irangate. Travelgate. Troopergate. And, lest we forget, Nipplegate. ...
  • Tomorrow's Spin Today

    As you may have heard--despite the media's, like, near-total silence on the subject--tomorrow's primaries and Texas and Ohio could very well decide the Democratic race. What's clear is that there are three possible results: an Obama sweep, a Clinton sweep or a split decision. What's not particularly clear is how the Clinton camp would react to each of those outcomes. Curious to find out more, I just masochistically subjected myself to two hours of dueling conference calls. First up was Team Clinton, with chief strategist Mark Penn and communications Howard Wolfson at 11:00 a.m., followed shortly thereafter by Obama campaign manager David Plouffe at 1:00. Fun! Here's what I found out. If Obama wins both Texas and Ohio--on average, he leads by .5 percent in the former and lags by seven in the latter--Clinton is toast. Or at least that was the implication. Neither campaign addressed the "Obama sweeps" scenario, which means it's a) obvious to Team...
  • All You Need is Hate

    In the YouTube era, nothing goes unnoticed. (And by "noticed," I mean endlessly decoded, debated and dissected on the Internets.) Appearing last night on "60 Minutes," Hillary Clinton was asked by correspondent Steve Kroft whether she "believe[s] that Senator Obama's a Muslim." Her response, according to CBS: "No, there is nothing to base that on. As far as I know." The clip (above) spread across the Web like wildfire, surfacing on (among other places) ABC.com, Andrew Sullivan and the Politico, where it drew more than 300 comments overnight--most of them outraged at Clinton for "stoking" the blatantly false Muslim rumor. For those prone to bellyache about the state of politics today--and the longer I cover the campaign, the more I sympathize--the Kroft-Clinton exchange is a perfect little case study in how craptastic the process has become. The culprits: 1) The Media: Why was Kroft asking Clinton whether she "believe[s] Se...
  • The Rezko FAQs

    As federal prosecutors in Chicago begin laying out evidence today in...
  • The Filter: 3.3.08

    A round-up of this morning's must-read stories.HOW DID THE CLINTON CAMPAIGN GET HERE?(Peter Nicholas, Los Angeles Times)Already, some in Clinton's senior staff are pointing fingers over what...
  • Clinton's Closing Argument

    Looking back at the past few days of doom-and-gloom Hillary Clinton coverage, I'm tempted to paraphrase Mark Twain: ...
  • Smalley: The Kitchen Sink

    Here's NEWSWEEK's Suzanne Smalley with a dispatch from the Clinton caravan in Texas:...
  • The Filter: 3.1.08

    A round-up of this morning's must-read stories.'RED PHONE' RESPONSE COULD DECIDE TEXAS(Ben Smith and Beth Frerking, Politico) Republicans said it was just the faintest preview of what voters are...
  • The Superdelegate Situation

    Don't let us hyperventilating media types distract you. We may prattle on about the latest spreads in Texas (Obama's up by two) and Ohio (Clinton's up by five), but it doesn't matter all that much, at this point, who wins those primaries--or the contests in Mississippi (probably Obama), Wyoming (Obama again), North Carolina (still Obama) and Pennsylvania (perhaps Clinton) that follow. This is a race for delegates, not states. And because Democratic delegates are awarded proportionally, there's simply no way for either candidate to reach the magic 2,025 majority--or for Clinton to significantly slash Obama's current 100-plus earned delegate lead--before the end of primary season on June 7.In other words, only the party's 795 superdelegates can pick a winner--no matter what happens next week and beyond.Of course, you've probably heard all of this before. But with the MSM barking away about this poll and that attack, it's important every...
  • The Audacity of Spin

     My inbox is still dizzy.At 11:02 this morning, I received the...
  • Ad Hawk: Vote for Hillary or These Children Get It

    On February 26, an aide to Hillary Clinton told the New York Times that the campaign would launch a "'kitchen sink' fusillade against [Barack] Obama" in the run-up to March 4's potentially decisive primaries in Texas and Ohio.Here's what the kitchen sink looks like....
  • The Filter: 2.29.08

    A round-up of this morning's must-read stories.FOR OBAMA, A TASTE OF WHAT A LONG BATTLE HOLDS(Adam Nagourney, New York Times)If Mr. Obama becomes the Democratic presidential nominee, he is sure...
  • Why Bloomberg Isn't Running

    Photo by Eliane Vanderborght, via FlickrAfter months of "will he or won't he" speculation--if only in Manhattan media circles--Big Apple mayor Mike Bloomberg finally declared this morning in a New York Times op-ed that he would not throw his hat in the presidential ring. "I listened carefully to those who encouraged me to run, but I am not--and will not be--a candidate for president," he wrote. Why not, and why now? On its surface, the essay actually seemed to argue for, not against, a Bloomberg bid. Hizzoner opened with a sanctimonious put down ("watching the 2008 presidential campaign, you sometimes get the feeling that the candidates--smart, all of them--must know better") followed by a guided tour of policy areas where his "common sense solutions" presumably stand in stark contrast to the tired pabulum emanating from the mainstream candidates' unimaginative maws. The point, according to Bloomie: "the vast majority of...