Andrew Romano

Stories by Andrew Romano

  • The Filter: 2.11.08

    A round-up of this morning's must-read stories.CLINTON REPLACES TOP AIDE AMID LOSSES(Anne E. Kornblut and Dan Balz, Washington Post)Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton shook up her presidential campaign yesterday, replacing campaign manager and longtime aide Patti Solis Doyle with Maggie Williams, her former White House chief of staff, in an acknowledgment of the unexpectedly difficult struggle in which she finds herself against Sen. Barack Obama... The removal of Doyle, 42, was portrayed as an amicable one initiated by...
  • Wolffe: 'Three State Sweep'

    Here's NEWSWEEK's Richard Wolffe on Obama's big (but expected) wins:Even before the polls closed, the Hillary Clinton campaign was trying to raise expectations about Barack Obama's...
  • He’s One Of Us Now

    Ah, the folly of youth. On Sept. 24, 2007, I pitched a story to my boss at NEWSWEEK about "Barack Obama...
  • It's Hard to Be a Republican in the City

    By Elise Soukup Let me make some generalizations about the women in my mommy group: They're young. They live in Manhattan. They're Mormon. They're registered Republican. They voted for Mitt Romney. There are exceptions, of course. Jennifer Strent, for example, is a registered Democrat who voted for Hillary Clinton. As everyone was e-mailing about their votes, she sent an e-mail that asked these questions: one, "Doesn't a Republican agenda go against the teachings of Christianity and Mormonism?" and two, "Doesn't interfering with a person's right to choose interfere with God's plan for us?" The e-mail spurred some 50 e-mails within the next 24 hours. The responses, if you were wondering, almost universally said to number one: no and to number two: no. But amidst all of this chatter, another theme emerged: encounters at the polls with workers who were shocked, and baffled, to meet Republicans. (Especially young, cute ones.) I&apos...
  • Fineman: Burying Mitt

    Here's my formidable NEWSWEEK colleague Howard Fineman with the Romney postmortem. In case you're wondering, I agree with his take. If Romney had stayed true to himself from the start, I think he would've been a more compelling candidate. Nobody blinks when you reinvent a business; but people aren't products, and in politics, unlike commerce, authenticity counts. Would 'the real Mitt' have won? Who knows. But I do suspect that he would've been less disagreeable than McCain or Giuliani among "true conservatives." And in this scrappy, sloppy race, that might've been enough. Here lieth the campaign of Mitt Romney,...
  • Ad Hawk: It's Never Too Early for Fear-Mongering!

    In case you weren't sure how Republicans would go after the Democratic presidential nominee in the general election, here's a hint: Barack Obama/Hillary Clinton will get you killed. That's the message of the new RNC ad ("Protect America Alert") posted above. Sure, it's ostensibly calling on Congress to make the 2007 updates to FISA (the 1978 Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act) permanent. And, yes, it criticizes Obama and Clinton for  "vot[ing] against the... FISA updates in 2007 and remain[ing] opposed to them today." But if the ad were really about, you know, the legislation, it might note that neither Obama nor Clinton objects to surveillance of potential terrorist calls from overseas into the U.S.; instead, they oppose ending debate on a bill that in its current form will immunize telecommunications firms that may have spied illegally on Americans, at the request of the Bush administration. (They recently returned to Washington to vote...
  • We Apologize for the Interruption...

    ... but Stumper will spend the next day or so on a brief blogging hiatus. The powers-that-be have asked that I focus my attention on a big story I'm writing for next week's dead-tree magazine, and I've (begrudgingly) accepted the challenge. I'll try my best to pop back in whenever possible, but posting should be relatively light through Saturday. Thanks so much for reading,Andrew 
  • The Filter: 2.7.08

    A round-up of this morning's must-read stories.DEMOCRATS' NIGHTMARE: BACK TO SMOKE-FILLED ROOMS(June Kronholz, Wall Street Journal)If neither Illinois Sen. Barack Obama nor New York Sen. Hillary Clinton...
  • Romney Wishes You a Happy Hanukkah. Now Will You Give Him Money?

    By Holly Bailey Mitt Romney has spent more than $35 million of his own cash on his campaign for the White House, but maybe somebody should lend the guy a few bucks to buy a calendar. In advance of next week's so-called Beltway primaries, where Republicans in Maryland, Virginia and Washington, D.C., will cast their votes for the nomination, the Romney campaign is apparently putting out robo-calls to drum up financial support for the former governor's campaign. A campaign aide to John McCain, who declined to be named, received one of the calls this afternoon on her cell phone and played the voicemail for reporters riding the campaign bus back into D.C., where McCain will spend the night tonight.The message, received at 3:46pm on Wednesday, is a recording of Romney's voice and lasted about 30 seconds. "Happy Hanukkah!" the governor says, almost two months after the official Jewish holiday. "This is Mitt Romney...I am running for president ...
  • February: Advantage, Obama

    Surprise, surprise--the Dems' Super Tuesday "Battle Royale" ended in a tie. It was a tie in the delegate race, with the Obama camp claiming a slim 14-delegate lead and Team Clinton citing an even smaller spread of five or six. It was a tie in the popular vote at 7.3 million ballots apiece. And it was a tie in the state-by-state sweepstakes: while Obama took more golds (14 to Clinton's eight), the former First Lady captured New York, New Jersey, California, Arizona and Massachusetts--nearly all the big battlegrounds. As Ron Brownstein put it, "The two candidates emerged from the unprecedented test still running...
  • The (Morning After) Filter: 2.6.08

    A round-up of this morning's must-read stories.TWO PARTIES, TWO DISTINCT PATHS TO THE NOMINATION(Adam Nagourney, New York Times)It is hard to see how Mr. McCain can be a strong general-election candidate — particularly going up against a Democratic Party...
  • It's a Bird! It's a Plane! It's... John McCain

    By Holly Bailey SAN DIEGO, Calif.--John McCain just touched down in San Diego for a last minute rally. With polls showing the race in California tight, McCain is speaking to a few hundred supporters here, a move that doesn't seem aimed at wooing undecided voters as much as getting prime placement on the local news just as voting closes tonight. McCain has spent much of Super Tuesday on a plane. He took off from Newark airport just outside New York City just about six hours ago, but he and his entourage have not been entirely out of touch with what's happening today. His campaign chartered a plane from Jet Blue, which has Direct TV at every seat. McCain's aides have been closely monitoring cable TV coverage of the campaign all day. In fact, when word broke that Mike Huckabee had won the West Virginia Republican presidential caucus--a contest that Mitt Romney had hoped to win--several McCain aides threw their hands in the air and shouted in delight, clearly pleased that...
  • Why Huckabee's West Virginia Win Is Bad News for Romney

    The networks are calling the West Virginia state primary convention for Mike Huckabee, which is good news, of course, for the former Arkansas governor. But it may be even more significant--in a negative sense--for Mitt Romney. The West Virginia results represent a victory of passion over organization, and it's hard to read them as anything but a repudiation of the Massachusetts pol's* efforts to rally anti-McCain conservatives around his candidacy.When Romney arrived this morning in Charleston to address the Republican convention, it was largely assumed that he had Mountain State in the bag. That confidence was partly the product of pure investment; his campaign went to work in the state in 2006, long before his rivals arrived, and Romney had visited repeatedly over the past several weeks. And part was establishment support; Mitt began the day with 280 committed state delegates (more than Huck or McCain) and all three West Virginia superdelegates in his column. Finally,...
  • Philips: The Third Man

    Here's NEWSWEEK's Matthew Philips on Mike Huckabee, who's barnstorming the South in an attempt to stay relevant:...
  • Clinton CW Watch

    TODAY: Clinton campaign chairman Terry McAuliffe on MSNBC, answering a question about whether Hillary will win California:You're talking states. What I care about [is] delegates. We will have more delegates than we had going into today. This is about winning delegates and onward we go.ONE MONTH AGO: Clinton campaign chairman Terry McAuliffe, answering a question about Hillary's third-place finish in Iowa:I hereby award McAuliffe NEWSWEEK's coveted "Wildly Oscillating, Up-Then-Down" Arrow.
  • The Viral Vote

    On Feb. 2, the 3.2-million-member liberal PAC known as MoveOn.org launched an "Endorse-O-Thon" for Barack Obama. The idea was that supporters would sign up to send personal email endorsements to five or  ten friends, and some of those friends would sign up to send their own endorsements, and so on--a basic electronic extension of the old political cliche that the best surrogates are people's friends and neighbors.But email is so, like, 2004.Which is why I was pleased to see that the Obama "Endorse-O-Thon" has now migrated to Facebook--a more effective medium. To compare, I haven't received any email endorsements, but six friends have already invited me to join the "I endorse Barack Obama" and "I'm voting for Obama today" groups on the social-networking site. The gap has a lot to do with the different technologies involved. Email is private: a closed-circuit conversation, often between two people, it provides no context beyond...
  • Breslau: A Not-So-Sure Thing

    Here's NEWSWEEK's Karen Breslau on how Obama and Clinton are playing the Super Tuesday expectations game....
  • Bailey: A Superstitious McCain

    Here's NEWSWEEK's Holly Bailey on the "guarded optimism" of Republican frontrunner John McCain. ...
  • What Day Is It Again?

    Oh, right. "Super Tuesday." Yawn. Psych! More like "yay." This is only, like, the most significantest day of the 2008 presidential primary season to date, with a total of forty-three nominating contests in 24 states following arcane, inscrutable rules to allocate 3,156 delegates. Are you ready for some politics? We here at Stumper headquarters sure are. Or at least we will be after we finish the dueling cups of coffee on our desk. We'll be manning the ol' mouse-and-keyboard for the rest of the day, bringing you quick news updates, dispatches from NEWSWEEK reporters nationwide and, as always, original Stumper content. Stay tuned for more. And thanks for reading, Andrew
  • The (Super Tuesday) Filter: 2.5.08

    A round-up of this morning's must-read stories.DEMS PLOT STRATEGY FOR A PROTRACTED BATTLE(Ben Smith, Politico)Analysts think it likely that the...
  • Super Tuesday, State by State: The Democrats

    CLICK HERE FOR THE REPUBLICANS When the votes are tallied tomorrow night--or in the wee hours Wednesday morning, more likely--22 states will award a total of 1,688 delegates to the Democratic candidates for president. In a typical election year, that'd be enough to put the top White House hopeful within spitting distance of 2,025--the number needed to clinch the nomination. But this year is anything but typical. ...