Andrew Romano

Stories by Andrew Romano

  • Factchecking the Democratic Slugfest

    If you thought the insults, accusations and attacks would stop after Monday night's feisty Democratic debate in Myrtle Beach, S.C.--well, you were wrong. Yesterday, Hillary Clinton reiterated her debate-night swipes at Obama on a host of issues, including Ronald Reagan, Iraq and health care. The goal: to undermine Obama's greatest strength--the perception that he's not a typical politician--by painting him as a timid, flip-flopping panderer (i.e., a typical politician). In response, the Obama camp said Clinton and her husband are "willing to say anything, distort anything, and twist anything in order to win an election." I am rubber, you are glue... Undeterred, Clinton is out today with a radio ad in South Carolina pounding Obama again for noting that the "Republicans were the party of ideas for a pretty long chunk of time there over the last 10, 15 years,” and Obama goes negative for the first time--on bankruptcy, NAFTA and economic stimulus--in...
  • The Filter: 1.23.08

    A round-up of this morning's must-read stories.CANDIDATE TURN ATTENTION TO GYRATING MARKETS(Adam Nagourney, New York Times)The weakened economy and the turmoil in financial markets have helped...
  • Hillary Likes Me. She Really, Really Likes Me.

     It's always nice to get an email from Hillary Clinton, because even though she's sort of standoffish on the trail, she really, you know, opens up when she's rocking the Microsoft Outlook.Take this morning, for example. At 11:50 a.m., I received a message from "Hillary Clinton" titled "The next debate." Hillary, it seems, was just dying to ask me something. "One of my favorite moments in any debate -- like the one we had last night -- is ...
  • MC Mitt in da Hizzouse

    An MP3 download of the Baja Men's 2000 novelty hit "Who Let the Dogs Out?": 99 cents.Some 'bling bling': Between $1.00 and $1 million.Seeing Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney utter both phrases at a Martin Luther King Birthday celebration in Jacksonville, Fla. yesterday: Priceless."Dogs" at the start; skip to 2:30 for the "bling." This is why YouTube exists. 
  • The Filter: 1.22.08

    A round-up of this morning's must-read stories.MERCHANTS OF TRIVIA(Matt Taibbi, Rolling Stone) Stripped of its prognosticating element, most campaign...
  • Wolffe: Turning Up the Heat

    NEWSWEEK's Richard Wolffe on tonight's heated Democratic debate:Family therapists might want to study the two Democratic...
  • The Filter: 1.21.08

    A round-up of this morning's must-read stories.THE NEWSWEEK ROSTER IN THE SHADOW OF BUSH (Evan Thomas)The...
  • There Will Be Luck

    By Holly Bailey Maybe John McCain is onto something with these superstitions of his. Just as he did in New Hampshire, McCain toted his lucky penny, his lucky nickel, his lucky compass and other good luck charms around South Carolina yesterday. His wife, Cindy, wore her lucky color, purple. And his staff is now just as superstitious. Mark McKinnon, McCain’s media advisor, showed up at the senator’s victory rally at the Citadel in Charleston wearing a black felt hat that he wore two weeks ago when McCain won New Hampshire. “I can’t take it off now,” McKinnon told Newsweek. Ditto for Mark Salter, McCain’s longtime aide, who has been honoring his own ritual—willing or not. “I’ve been wearing the same clothes for the last 12 days!” Salter joked. It's unclear if McCain will shed his once-honored tradition of seeing a movie on Election Day. He was aiming yesterday for a 4:00 p.m. showing of "There Will Be Blood," the new Paul Thomas Anderson flick, but he and aides ran out...
  • The Winner's Circle

    NEWSWEEK's Arian Campo-Flores on Clinton:The scene on Saturday morning in the employees' cafeteria at Las...
  • 'Mac is Back'

     CHARLESTON, S.C.--That's what the crowd is chanting here at the...
  • After South Carolina: Fred Thompson

    UPDATE, 8:00 p.m.: As he battled for third with Romney in South Carolina, Fred Thompson delivered remarks from the USC campus that seem to suggest an imminent departure from the race. “My friends, we will always be bound by a close bond because we have...
  • After South Carolina: Mike Huckabee

    So while I'm at it, here's another reckless prediction:  If Mike Huckabee finishes first tonight, he may become the only Republican since 1980 to win South Carolina and not end up as the nominee. I contradict history at my own peril, but this much is clear: Huckabee would have a much harder time than McCain springboarding from South Carolina to a decisive win on Super-Duper Tuesday. For starters, he has yet to expand his base beyond evangelicals. In Iowa, he won 46 percent of the evangelical vote, and if he wins tonight, they'll be largely responsible. But while there are enough evangelicals in the Palmetto and Hawkeye States to propel a candidate to victory, the landscape is vastly different in Florida, California, Illinois, New York and many of the 22 other Feb. 5 states. (See Michigan, where he won only 16 percent of the vote.) In fact, Huckabee's early appeals to social conservatives--this week he provoked Fred Thompson's ire by calling the Constit...
  • After South Carolina: John McCain

    Screw it. I'm feeling reckless. If McCain wins South Carolina tonight, he will probably win the Republican nomination. There, I said it.  Before you flood my inbox with hate mail, let's examine the evidence. After South Carolina, the Republican race moves to Florida on Jan. 29. Who's out front there? McCain, who leapt to the lead immediately after winning New Hampshire. He hasn't let go, even after losing Michigan to Mitt Romney. A month ago he polled at 10 percent; now he's up to 23. If the Palmetto State proves that New Hampshire wasn't a fluke, expect those numbers to climb higher--meaning that at that point it'll be up to Giuliani and Romney, both of whom need wins in the Sunshine State to stay viable, to knock the new frontrunner off his pedestal. If they fail, the Arizona senator will close out the first round of nominating contests with the wind at his back. I'm guessing that his (already sizable) 9.5 percent lead in the national...
  • After Nevada: Hillary Clinton

    UPDATE: CLINTON WINS--'UNFAIR' CAUCUSES AND ALL!Final Pre-Caucus Polling Average: First Place, 37.8 percent (4.0 ahead of Obama)...
  • After Nevada: Barack Obama

    Final Pre-Caucus Polling Average: Second Place, 33.8 percent (4.0 behind Clinton)Current National Polling Average: Second Place, 33.2 percent (8.1 behind Clinton)Make no mistake: Obama has the most to gain from a Nevada victory....
  • After Nevada: John Edwards

    Final Pre-Caucus Polling Average: Third Place, 18.0 percent (15.8 behind Obama, 19.8 behind Clinton)...
  • The Moment You've All Been Waiting For.

    CHARLESTON, S.C.--Whew. Finally. The wait is over. It's been four whole days since Michigan, our last presidential primary. For the Dems, it's been eleven. As a wise man once said, looks like I picked the wrong week to quit sniffing glue....
  • Slideshow: McCain's Monomaniacal Closing Argument

     CHARLESTON, S.C.--Pop quiz, hotshot. What does John McCain want the voters of South Carolina to keep in mind when they head to the polls tomorrow?A. His 24-year pro-life recordB. His ad slamming Hillary Clinton for supporting a Woodstock MuseumC. His opposition to "the breakdown of the family"D. His military credWhen I attended McCain's first post-Michigan stop in South Carolina--11:00 a.m. Wednesday at the Carolina First Center in Greenville--he mentioned all four. With third-party groups attacking his anti-abortion bona fides and evangelical darling Mike Huckabee posing a serious threat, McCain has spent much of the week protecting his right flank. Hence A through C. But tonight I attended his final stop before Saturday's all-important Palmetto State primary, and he mentioned only D --the military. Mentioned might be too weak a word.  A closing argument--the candidate's final pitch before an election--has to be clear, concise and indelible. Tonight,...
  • Romney, Riled Up

    By Suzanne SmalleyReporters on the Romney bus are starved for drama. Mike Huckabee...
  • The (Abbreviated Primary-Eve) Filter: 1.18.08

    A round-up of this morning's must-read stories. DEMOCRATS SKIRMISH FOR SUPPORT IN NEVADA (USA Today)EDWARDS ATTACKS OBAMA FOR VIEW OF REAGAN (NY Times) BILL CLINTON, STUMPING AND SIMMERING (NY Times) OBAMA HIT OVER LABOR UNION ADS (Washington Times) A NEWLY CONFIDENT CLINTON FOCUSES MORE ON ECONOMY THAN OBAMA (Washington Post) SOUTHERN BLACKS ARE SPLIT OVER CLINTON VS. OBAMA (NY Times) ROMNEY LEAVES SOUTH CAROLINA TO FOCUS ON NEVADA (NY Times) S.C. PRIMARY MAY YIELD FRONTRUNNER, ANSWERS (USA Today) GIULIANI HAD TIES TO COMPANY TRYING TO SELL BORDER TECH (NY Times) THOMPSON HOPES S.C. REVIVES HIS CAMPAIGN (Washington Post) 
  • Best. Campaign. Question. Ever.

    CLEMSON, S.C.--Imagine a wiry little man with a flop of gray hair. He's wearing a brown leather bomber jacket. Medium build. Every word he says, he shouts. Like he's half deaf. Sounds like an irate hillbilly, even if he's not. (He could be.) After each sentence, he pauses, lifts his chin, then plunges back in. Theatrical. Now imagine him saying the following to Fred Thompson at the Stable Steakhouse in Prosperity, South Carolina, with one hand resting on the back of his booth and a portrait of a horse hanging over his head: Thompson: Yes, sir. Man: Fred, I drove over 500 miles to see you.Thompson: Bless your heart. Let's give this man a hand. (Applause, cheers)Man: I came over Finch Mountain in a snowstorm. (Pause) May I call you Fred? Thompson: Absolutely. Man: That's okay until January and I can call you Mr. President. (Laughter, more applause). Now, I've got a question. Thompson: Yes sir.Man: (Pause) I'm looking for a tall man who will stand...
  • Nevada: A Chancy Proposition

     While I zip around South Carolina covering the Republicans, Richard Wolffe reports from Nevada on the confusion surrounding the Silver State's Jan. 19 Democratic caucuses:...
  • No Clear Winner in GOP Debate

    After the latest Republican presidential debate, the crowded contest remains as muddled as ever.