Andrew Romano

Stories by Andrew Romano

  • It's a Bird! It's a Plane! It's... John McCain

    By Holly Bailey SAN DIEGO, Calif.--John McCain just touched down in San Diego for a last minute rally. With polls showing the race in California tight, McCain is speaking to a few hundred supporters here, a move that doesn't seem aimed at wooing undecided voters as much as getting prime placement on the local news just as voting closes tonight. McCain has spent much of Super Tuesday on a plane. He took off from Newark airport just outside New York City just about six hours ago, but he and his entourage have not been entirely out of touch with what's happening today. His campaign chartered a plane from Jet Blue, which has Direct TV at every seat. McCain's aides have been closely monitoring cable TV coverage of the campaign all day. In fact, when word broke that Mike Huckabee had won the West Virginia Republican presidential caucus--a contest that Mitt Romney had hoped to win--several McCain aides threw their hands in the air and shouted in delight, clearly pleased that...
  • Why Huckabee's West Virginia Win Is Bad News for Romney

    The networks are calling the West Virginia state primary convention for Mike Huckabee, which is good news, of course, for the former Arkansas governor. But it may be even more significant--in a negative sense--for Mitt Romney. The West Virginia results represent a victory of passion over organization, and it's hard to read them as anything but a repudiation of the Massachusetts pol's* efforts to rally anti-McCain conservatives around his candidacy.When Romney arrived this morning in Charleston to address the Republican convention, it was largely assumed that he had Mountain State in the bag. That confidence was partly the product of pure investment; his campaign went to work in the state in 2006, long before his rivals arrived, and Romney had visited repeatedly over the past several weeks. And part was establishment support; Mitt began the day with 280 committed state delegates (more than Huck or McCain) and all three West Virginia superdelegates in his column. Finally,...
  • Philips: The Third Man

    Here's NEWSWEEK's Matthew Philips on Mike Huckabee, who's barnstorming the South in an attempt to stay relevant:...
  • Clinton CW Watch

    TODAY: Clinton campaign chairman Terry McAuliffe on MSNBC, answering a question about whether Hillary will win California:You're talking states. What I care about [is] delegates. We will have more delegates than we had going into today. This is about winning delegates and onward we go.ONE MONTH AGO: Clinton campaign chairman Terry McAuliffe, answering a question about Hillary's third-place finish in Iowa:I hereby award McAuliffe NEWSWEEK's coveted "Wildly Oscillating, Up-Then-Down" Arrow.
  • The Viral Vote

    On Feb. 2, the 3.2-million-member liberal PAC known as MoveOn.org launched an "Endorse-O-Thon" for Barack Obama. The idea was that supporters would sign up to send personal email endorsements to five or  ten friends, and some of those friends would sign up to send their own endorsements, and so on--a basic electronic extension of the old political cliche that the best surrogates are people's friends and neighbors.But email is so, like, 2004.Which is why I was pleased to see that the Obama "Endorse-O-Thon" has now migrated to Facebook--a more effective medium. To compare, I haven't received any email endorsements, but six friends have already invited me to join the "I endorse Barack Obama" and "I'm voting for Obama today" groups on the social-networking site. The gap has a lot to do with the different technologies involved. Email is private: a closed-circuit conversation, often between two people, it provides no context beyond...
  • Breslau: A Not-So-Sure Thing

    Here's NEWSWEEK's Karen Breslau on how Obama and Clinton are playing the Super Tuesday expectations game....
  • Bailey: A Superstitious McCain

    Here's NEWSWEEK's Holly Bailey on the "guarded optimism" of Republican frontrunner John McCain. ...
  • What Day Is It Again?

    Oh, right. "Super Tuesday." Yawn. Psych! More like "yay." This is only, like, the most significantest day of the 2008 presidential primary season to date, with a total of forty-three nominating contests in 24 states following arcane, inscrutable rules to allocate 3,156 delegates. Are you ready for some politics? We here at Stumper headquarters sure are. Or at least we will be after we finish the dueling cups of coffee on our desk. We'll be manning the ol' mouse-and-keyboard for the rest of the day, bringing you quick news updates, dispatches from NEWSWEEK reporters nationwide and, as always, original Stumper content. Stay tuned for more. And thanks for reading, Andrew
  • The (Super Tuesday) Filter: 2.5.08

    A round-up of this morning's must-read stories.DEMS PLOT STRATEGY FOR A PROTRACTED BATTLE(Ben Smith, Politico)Analysts think it likely that the...
  • Super Tuesday, State by State: The Democrats

    CLICK HERE FOR THE REPUBLICANS When the votes are tallied tomorrow night--or in the wee hours Wednesday morning, more likely--22 states will award a total of 1,688 delegates to the Democratic candidates for president. In a typical election year, that'd be enough to put the top White House hopeful within spitting distance of 2,025--the number needed to clinch the nomination. But this year is anything but typical. ...
  • Romney’s Last-Ditch Pitch

    By Suzanne SmalleyJohn McCain is opening his lead in the polls, and cementing the impression that he may well emerge from Super Tuesday as the Republican Party’s presumptive nominee. Which makes life especially challenging at the moment for McCain’s principal rival, Mitt Romney. As he heads into the final stretch before some 22 states make their preferences known, Romney’s aides say the former Massachusetts governor is benefiting from a tide of anti-McCain Republicans coming his way-and making inroads with backers of Mike Huckabee, who are suddenly panicking at the idea of a McCain presidency. That message was very much in evidence, as Romney scampered across the delegate map. He woke up Monday morning in Tennessee and flew to Atlanta; plans call for him to then board a plane for Long Beach, California, where he’s scheduled to attend a rally before flying back to West Virginia overnight. He’ll stump in Charleston Tuesday morning, before Romney and the weary press corps traveling...
  • The NEWSWEEK Lineup

    Your one-stop shop for this week's political exclusives.WHAT THESE EYES HAVE SEEN (Evan Thomas)He's endured the unendurable, and survived. Inside the mind and heart of John McCain.'YOU STICK TO WHAT YOU BELIEVE IN' (Evan Thomas and Holly Bailey) On Super Tuesday eve, McCain traces his turnaround. CRACKUP? NOT SO FAST (Karl Rove)Calm down. The GOP's demise isn't as imminent as some would have it. WHEN IT'S HEAD VERSUS HEART, THE HEART WINS (Sharon Begley)Science shows that when we are deciding which candidate to support,...
  • The Filter: 2.2.08

    A round-up of this morning's must-read stories.OBAMA IS RACING AGAINST THE CLOCK(Alec MacGillis and Anne E. Kornblut, Washington Post)The compressed primary calendar presents a challenge for all of the...
  • Back to the Big Apple

    Hey everyone: After spending 25 of the last 30 days on the road, I'm about to board a plane from Los Angeles to New York to spend some time at home. Updating Stumper from 35,000 feet will be tough, so don't hold your breath for the next few hours. I'm sure you're crushed. I'll be back tomorrow at the latest. Best,Andrew
  • The Filter: 2.1.08

    A round-up of this morning's must-read stories.Brooks on McCain. Hayes on Obama. Krugman on Edwards. ...
  • Ad Hawk: Freefallin' with Hillary

    Using metaphors in political advertising is tricky. When effective, they can serve as a catchy way to sum up an opponent's weaknesses, like in 2004, when the Bush campaign reinforced the stereotype of a flip-flopping John Kerry with footage of him tacking left and right while windsurfing; providing viewers with a memorable image is much more effective than simply slinging mud. Or they can seem embarrassingly overwrought and convoluted. A recent Mitt Romney ad called "Ocean," which sees Romney comparing our culture to "a cesspool of violence, and sex, and drugs, and indolence, and perversions" over sunset shots of children frolicking in the breakers, is a perfect example. It was creepy.The Clinton campaign--which is out this week with two new spots touting its candidate's economic credentials--rarely gets creative with its advertising. Most of its commercials are like "Can Do": soft shots of smiling, multiracial citizens crosscut with a coiffe...