Anna Kuchment

Stories by Anna Kuchment

  • MUSIC: SUMMER FESTIVALS

    Whether you know your Haydn from your Handel or can't tell Mozart from Mendelssohn, summer festivals offer a leisurely and inexpensive way to enjoy classical music. Some of the high notes:Ravinia Highland Park, Ill. ravinia.org Bored with the classics? Check out the Zulu opera "Princess Magogo kaDinuzulu" (June 4-6) and "Los Sazones," a salsa version of Vivaldi's "The Four Seasons" (Aug. 15). Tickets: $10-$70.Tanglewood Lenox, Mass. tanglewood.org Shaggy-haired maestro Seiji Ozawa visits from Vienna (Aug. 1), and cellist Yo-Yo Ma brings his Silk Road Project to the 5,000-seat "Shed" (Aug. 7). Tix: $16-$92.Oregon Bach Festival Eugene, Ore. oregonbachfestival.com Bach master Helmuth Rilling and his Gchinger choir take on the unforgettable St. Matthew Passion (June 25). Tix: $27-$49.Santa Fe Opera Santa Fe, N.M. santafeopera.org Is Mozart's "Don Giovanni" the greatest opera ever written? Hear for yourself (July 3-Aug. 27). Tix: $10-$130.
  • In Season: Dishing The Shad

    Some look for cherry blossoms and robins as the first signs of spring. Others impatiently check local seafood shops for the arrival of a rare, silvery fish called shad. The tender, tasty cousin of the herring spawns in rivers off the Atlantic and Pacific; peak shad-fishing season is between March and June. Because it's available for a relatively short period of time--and because its stocks have become depleted along the East Coast--the shad is greeted with festivals and added to the menus of upscale restaurants. In New York City, Rick Moonen, chef and owner of RM, serves seared shad with its roe atop a medley of sauteed peas and caramelized onions. But you don't have to be fancy when cooking it at home. "Shad has a robust, buttery flavor, so it doesn't need much," says Joe Gurrera, owner of New York seafood shop Citarella. Drizzle it with olive oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper and slide it in the broiler for eight minutes. And be sure to buy it boned. Can't find filleted shad near...
  • FOOD: MINI BURGERS

    They've made the leap from fast-food staple to stylish hors d'oeuvre. Sample the best gourmet two-ounce burgers at these upscale clubs and restaurants.POP BURGER, New York: This mod lounge and burger window serves chunky, juicy patties on toasted brioche buns. $5 for two at the window, $12 for three in the lounge. 212-414-8686.AURA, Portland, Ore.: Not a beef eater? No problem. This chic bar offers salmon, jerked-chicken and portobello burgers in addition to a spicy version of the classic. $9 for three. 503-597-2872.MATCHBOX, Washington, D.C.: This three-story bistro is a great place to bring your kids. Its gourmet sliders, served on a one-ounce buttered brioche, come with crispy onion straws. $6, $9 or $12 for an order of three, six or nine. 202-289-4441.LE CIRQUE 2000, New York: Made with shredded short ribs, caramelized onions and porcini mushrooms, and served with parsleyed potatoes, these are for the true gourmet. $24 for two. 212-303-7788.
  • MUST-HAVES

    You've moved into a new office and need to decorate. Or your dorm room, plastered with those Che Guevara posters, could use a more personal touch. Go shopping for a "designer toy." These collectible figurines, inspired by the imaginative toys sold in Tokyo vending machines, are created by Gen-X artists and designers in limited editions. They made their toy-fair debut last week in New York, and are rapidly spreading from a niche movement to mass popularity. "It's all about dealing with fear and anxiety in plastic," says Attaboy, creator of Axtrx (near right). Find one to suit your personality. But whatever you do, don't give them to your 5-year-old.
  • CHEAT SHEET: BARKING RIGHTS

    This week, 2,632 pooches and their stylists will descend on Madison Square Garden for the 128th Westminster dog show. Before you turn on the tube, get acquainted with the top dogs. "The hottest dog in the country right now is a Norfolk terrier named Coco," says David Frei, director of communications for the Westminster Kennel Club. In the past year, Coco has swept nearly every major competition in the country, earning more than $50,000 in prize money, plus a Suzuki 4WD for her owners. At Westminster, she could walk away with a silver cup. (There's no monetary award.) Coco is known for her charisma and showmanship, but also meets the lengthy "standard" for her breed, which includes guidelines on color ("white marks are not desirable"), temperament ("alert, gregarious") and size. The "favorite," though, wins only half the time. Dogs who could score an upset include Bunny, an Ibizan hound with a white, Playboy-bunny-shape splotch on her back; Les, a Pekingese, and Miki, a standard...
  • VIDEO STORE STICK FLICKS

    If last week's release of "Miracle," about the 1980 Miracle on Ice, has made you hungry for hockey flicks, check out these old and new classics: 'Slap Shot' Paul Newman heads a scrappy team of minor-league goons. Funny, well written--and the final scene tops "The Full Monty."'Mystery, Alaska' A hick pond-hockey team takes on the New York Rangers. Good puck action and a great cast, but the writing takes it in the eye.'Love Story' Upper-crust Harvard jock meets blue-collar Radcliffe girl. Sweet, but the verbal repartee feels very dated.'The Mighty Ducks' At least this "Bad News Bears" wanna-be is better than its name.'Rollerball' A sci-fi thriller with cool, retro-futurist sets. James Caan plays the star of a violent, hockey-inspired game in the year 2018.
  • HOLIDAYS: ANOTHER NEW YEAR

    If you're feeling a post-holiday letdown, don't despair. This week marks the start of the Chinese Year of the Monkey, a.k.a. 4702. Here's how to celebrate, whether your roots are in Beijing or Baltimore.Watch: Head to your local Chinatown to see the lion and dragon dancers. The costumes are meant to scare away demons and usher in good luck.Eat: Long noodles for longevity, boiled dumplings for friendship and togetherness, and whole fish or chicken for abundance and prosperity.Decorate: In spoken Cantonese, the word fa, for flower, resembles the word for wealth. Chinese families fill their homes with plum and peach blossoms, peonies, mums and orange trees.Give: Children receive red envelopes, or lai si, stuffed with dollar bills. Buy them in stationery stores or at xanako.com.
  • Monkey's Best Friend

    Prudy is one of the most popular baboons in her group. When her fellow monkeys pass by, they raise their tails in deference. When her fur grows dusty there's always a volunteer to give it a good grooming. For eight years, she's even had that rare thing in the baboon world: a steady male companion. Rocky would carry her children on his back and accompany her on foraging expeditions through the savannah at the foot of Kenya's Mount Kilimanjaro. Even though Rocky left the group in August, Prudy still has female friends and relatives she can count on. In 23 years, she's given birth to 11 kids, of which eight have survived.Viva, a female from a nearby group, is a social pariah. When she approaches her fellow baboons, they often lunge at her threateningly or raise their eyebrows, flashing the pale pigment of their eyelids, to scare her off. She's also been less fortunate in childbirth. In 18 years, she's delivered eight children, but only four have survived.One of the biggest cliches in...
  • Get A Move On

    Before leaving to meet his friend for dinner the other night, Sakae Fujimoto checked the local traffic report. Instead of flipping stations on the radio, he booted up his in-car navigation system. "Where would you like to go?" a computerized female voice inquired. Fujimoto specified an address in Shinagawa, a Tokyo district 16 miles north of his apartment. When a map appeared on his monitor, red arrows showed that a traffic jam was blocking one of the main roads into the city. The voice came back to warn him that there had been a car accident 500 yards ahead; Tokyo-bound traffic was slowing to a crawl. But there was good news, too: the screen displayed five quick alternate routes into town, with estimates of how long each would take. He chose one, and 30 minutes later was sitting down over Korean barbecue with his friend.Traffic has been the bane of city living for more than 2,000 years. When the streets of ancient Rome grew jammed with carts, vendors and oxen, the caesars banned...
  • Where Colorful Birds Sing

    The moment Saira Shah and her camera crew glimpsed the small mud house in northern Afghanistan, they knew something awful had happened there. "We all felt it," she writes in her new memoir, "The Storyteller's Daughter" (272 pages. Knopf). "It had left a residue, as tangible as a smell you can't get rid of--a kick of ammonia." In the courtyard sat three little girls dressed in colorful veils, who told Shah their story: a group of Taliban soldiers had ordered the family to leave so the troops could use the house as their headquarters. When the girls' mother resisted, the soldiers shot her before her children's eyes and then stayed with the girls for two days. "I was sure that something had happened to them after their mother was killed," writes Shah. "But I couldn't bring myself to broach the subject."Shah, a British-Afghan journalist, captured her interview with Fawzia, Fairuza and Amina in her spring 2001 documentary "Beneath the Veil," which examined the Taliban's oppression and...
  • Paris On The Amazon

    The last remote and pristine forest on our distressed and overcrowded earth" is how Greenpeace describes the Amazon River Valley. For decades now, this romantic view of the Amazon, as a vestige of the once free land corrupted by the arrival of Europeans in the 15th century, has persisted in the popular imagination. Scientists also assumed, without evidence to the contrary, that indigenous tribes tiptoed their way through the forest, living their lives while leaving nature almost completely undisturbed. Human settlements and the grab for gold and timber, they thought, came to the world's largest rain forest only in the last few hundred years.Now scientists are painting a radically different picture of the Amazon's prehistory. Long before Christopher Columbus dropped anchor in the New World, indigenous tribes were breaking ground on their version of Paris on the Amazon. They burned and chopped down swaths of rain forest to make way for majestic boulevards and circular plazas. They...
  • Truly Total Recall

    In 1885 German philosopher Hermann Ebbinghaus showed that two thirds of what we learn vanishes from our brains within an hour. That disheartening "forgetting curve" is the reason we paper our computer screens with Post-it notes, mumble mental shopping lists like mantras and consult our PDAs at every opportunity. Sunil Vemuri, a graduate student at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Media Lab, is hoping to fill in the holes left by our sometimes fickle minds. How? "Our focus," he says, "is on audio recording everything in our lives."Vemuri has spent much of the last year and a half strapped to a microphone and PDA, which picks up every word he utters to friends, colleagues and family and beams the information wirelessly to a server. Voice-recognition software converts the spoken word into text and delivers it to his laptop, where it is cataloged along with hourly weather reports, screen grabs, Internet news sites, his e-mail, every item on his daily calendar and--via a...
  • Taste Tricks

    Bitterness is in. Lately customers at Studio, a French-Mediterranean restaurant in Laguna Beach, California, have been ordering more frisee salads, endive, dark chocolate gateaux and strong coffee, says executive chef James Boyce. "Years ago, we didn't see a lot of that," he says. The surge in popularity, though, actually makes the chef's task of juggling flavors more difficult. Bitter flavors are hard to control. Raspberries and blackberries picked before their prime--and just about any dessert made from citrus fruits, for that matter--need tempering doses of sugar or honey. The red-wine reduction sauce atop Boyce's pancetta-wrapped New Zealand venison might taste too sharp without the dish's rich juices. Each teaspoon, dollop or pinch, though, contributes to obesity, heart disease, tooth decay, high blood pressure and other food-related ailments. What if there were some way of manipulating the sensation of bitterness without having to pile on a bunch of other flavors and unhealthy...
  • It's Better To Belong

    Members' clubs have long been synonymous with cigars and old money. But over the past few years a new, hipper crop has emerged that welcomes women and seduces members with champagne, celebrities and late-night extravagance. Should you join? A survey of what to expect:Soho House, New York and London: This eight-year-old London club just opened its first Manhattan outpost, and owner Nick Jones hopes to eventually expand to Miami, Los Angeles and Paris. Members are mostly film and media types--"like-minded people," he says. Hotel rooms in New York come with Boffi bathtubs at the foot of each bed--because "bathing should be a social experience rather than a necessity"--as well as private steam rooms. Registration fee: $200 (U.S.), 200 pounds (U.K.). Annual fee: $900 (U.S.), 400 pounds (U.K.); all applicants must be nominated by two members and approved by a committee.Home House, London: Using the 1776 party palace of Countess Elizabeth of Home, Home House, opened in 1999, takes the...
  • Flying Coach

    Business travel used to be almost fun. Agnes Mercier, 31, an account manager for a Paris-based advertising company, remembers jetting freely across Europe, meeting clients over multicourse feasts at some of the best restaurants in London, Brussels and Paris. Now, with her expense account slashed by a third, Mercier can barely afford a sandwich on the Eurostar to London. "They're so expensive," she says. "I don't want to blow my whole per diem on lunch."It's not just the food. Two years ago business travelers were tossing back free martinis at the airport lounge, riding in chauffeur-driven cars, receiving neck massages in the business-class cabin and slipping into cozy bathrobes--at five-star hotels. Now it's a different world--like falling asleep in a first-class flat bed and waking up stuffed between two snoring passengers in coach. Instead of having their trips arranged by agents over the phone, employees are going online themselves in search of bargain fares. Meetings that were...
  • Sars: Contain Yourself

    As of last week, the respiratory illness SARS had infected 2,890 people worldwide and killed 116. But despite the disease's onslaught, health officials emphasize that 96 percent of victims recover fully and that there is no hard evidence of airborne or blood-borne transmission. "We are overisolating, overdiagnosing and probably overdoing the whole effort to achieve containment," says Julie Gerberding, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. She adds that the U.S. tally (166 suspected cases) would fall once a reliable diagnostic test was found. Researchers at the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute for Infectious Diseases, at Fort Detrick, Md., are screening thousands of compounds that might help patients. Tests seemed to rule out the antiviral drug ribavirin, while interferon, used to fight hepatitis B and C, looked promising (despite limits on potential use due to side effects). "I think it'll work," says Peter Jahrling, USAMRIID's chief scientific adviser. -
  • 'A Matter Of Hygiene'

    Each year, it seems, a new microbe emerges to strike fear in the hearts of microbiologists--and, every once in a while, the rest of us as well. SARS is only the most recent of a succession of new pathogens to have emerged in recent years. Health experts worry that our global culture means that many more, and more destructive, pathogens are on the way. NEWSWEEK's Anna Kuchment spoke with Robert Webster, professor of virology at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in Memphis, Tennessee, about the threat. Excerpts:As a virologist and influenza expert, what has occurred to you as you've watched this epidemic unfold?I guess the key question in my mind is, is it going to become a pandemic? A pandemic is something that spreads throughout the entire world, and this seems to be heading in that direction. I have been watching this situation with great concern, because the worst pandemic that we know about is the 1918 flu pandemic, and the death rate in this thing right now [about 3.5...
  • Dna, Five Decades On

    James Watson was just 24 years old when he helped make the discovery that would earn him, Francis Crick and Maurice Wilkins a joint Nobel Prize in science. Exactly 50 years ago next Friday, Watson stood in his Cambridge University office marveling at the cardboard model he had just built of the molecule of heredity: the DNA double helix. Since that day, Watson has written a best-selling memoir ("The Double Helix"), built the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory on New York's Long Island into a world-class research institution and served as the first director of the Human Genome Project. Watson recently reflected on his career with NEWSWEEK's Anna Kuchment. Excerpts:KUCHMENT: What first drew you to the study of genes?WATSON: I was reading the book "What Is Life?" by Schrodinger [as a teenager], and he said the essence of life is the information in genes. That was probably the first time I ever thought a molecule carries genetic information.What do you think accounts for the fact that you...
  • Spring Forecast: Baubles That Pop

    For much of the past decade, women's jewelry has been virtually invisible. Simple silver rings, stud or hoop earrings and slender chain necklaces seemed the way to go, unless you wanted to risk looking (gasp!) like a hippie. No longer. "This season the feeling is very jubilant, which was quite a surprise," says Carmen Borgonovo, editor of W Jewelry, the first consumer magazine for baubles, which will debut in April. The styles now appearing in jewelers' windows and in department stores are bright, glamorous and, in many cases, as outsized as something Zsa Zsa Gabor might wear.In general, fine jewelry is flourishing even at a time when other segments of the luxury market have stagnated. That success has been driven, in part, by the growing numbers of women who are buying pieces for themselves. Says Elizabeth Florence, executive director of the Jewelry Information Center in New York (www.jic.org), "Female self-purchase has grown like wildfire in the last five years. Women are not...
  • Dollars And Degrees

    American economists once spoofed university education as the only industry in which those who consume its product do not purchase it; those who produce it do not sell it, and those who finance it do not control it. That apt description, made in the 1970s, has been undermined since then by the emergence of the first for-profit universities in the United States. Controlled by entrepreneurs, these schools--which number about 700 and counting-- sell a practical education to career-minded students and make a good buck doing it. They are now expanding abroad, creating the first multinational corporations in a sector long suspicious of balance sheets.The biggest is publicly traded Sylvan Learning Systems, which has purchased six schools with a total of 60,000 students in Latin America and Western Europe since 1999. Its privately held rival, Apollo International, recently opened a three-campus university in Brazil, one in India and plans a third in Mexico. "We hope to get up to a 30- to 40...
  • Style: Not Your Grandma's Mink

    For fur lovers, the 1980s and 1990s were harsh years. Groups like PETA took to splashing ink on minks and parading hideous images of suffering animals outside fashion shows. The 1990s brought a wave of minimalism that forced many to put their pelts on layaway. But lately the controversial clothing has made a roaring comeback. For the fall/winter 2002 shows nearly all the major designers, from Gucci to Jean Paul Gaultier to Dolce & Gabbana, included fur in their collections. "We said, 'There is a phenomenon here,' and we noted it," says Carine Roitfeld, editor in chief of French Vogue, which devoted its September issue to the subject.But the New Fur looks nothing like the old. Gone are the heavy, shapeless, ankle-length coats that could make a woman's knees buckle. Instead, designers rolled out a slew of hip, light and colorful creations at last spring's shows. Jean Paul Gaultier combined fur with jersey fabric in his "rolled pullover"--a cowl-necked top wrapped in mink spirals....
  • A Rose Takes Root

    When the Globe Theater opened in London in 1997, no one knew what to expect. Critics smelled a gimmick in the heavily hyped reproduction of Shakespeare's famous stage and worried that the venue would be more concerned with tourist pounds than artistic merit. Theatergoers felt disoriented. "The audience felt it was a bit of a theme park and thought, 'What's required of me here is to throw vegetables or leave my mug of beer on the stage'," as the groundlings of Shakespeare's time might have, says Giles Block, a director at the Globe. But after a few years of adjustment, the theater has become one of the most popular in London, pulling in larger and younger audiences than any other playhouse--and winning rave reviews from critics.Now a theater ensemble is hoping to repeat that success across the Atlantic, in the Berkshire mountains of western Massachussetts. Shakespeare & Company, a respected troupe founded by expat British actor and director Tina Packer, hopes to break ground soon...
  • Lending A Helping Hand

    Wearing a hard hat and face shield, Stan Vicich stands beneath a 50-foot eucalyptus tree on a volcanic island off the coast of Australia. His arms outstretched, he's waiting for a grunting, silver-haired koala named Delma to shin far enough down the tree trunk to be grabbed and thrust into a burlap sack. Several other tourists like Vicich are stationed nearby, some waving aluminum poles with rags on the end near the koala's face, one documenting it all on video. After a few more maneuvers, Delma backs down the tree and the mission is completed. "This is my first time seeing [a koala] in the wild," says Vicich excitedly, his right hand bleeding from where Delma has just scratched him. "My 7-year-old will be jealous," adds David Trapnell, a group financial controller from Perth, posing for a photo with the marsupial as she pokes her head out of the bag.Despite the hard work involved in koala trapping, this has been a dream vacation for Vicich and Trapnell. Along with seven other...
  • Time To Read An E-Book?

    Marc Steuben is hooked on electronic books. "I love the e-reading experience," says the 37-year-old programmer from Boulder, Colorado. "I like the search functionality, I like that I can resize text to make it bigger and I like the fact that it's backlit, so I can read at night without the lights on." He feels no different about his e-book, he says, than another reader might feel about a well-worn copy of "The Catcher in the Rye." "People say there's something sensual about books that they love. But you can get that same connection and experience from an e-book."E-books? Most of us haven't given them a second thought since Stephen King's digitally published "Riding the Bullet" was supposed to relegate paperbacks to the status of stone tablets. That was back in March 2000. After 400,000 fans ordered the novella in a single day, publishers like Time Warner and Random House raced to set up e-divisions of their own. But King's book never translated to the rest of the industry...
  • Queens: Moma And Beyond

    This week New York's Museum of Modern Art opens MoMA QNS, the temporary outpost that will serve artgoers until its new $800 million Manhattan building opens in 2005. While you are there, check out these other Queens hot spots.1. Isamu Noguchi Museum, Sunnyside 718-204-7088. This Japanese-American artist's sculptures have a calming Zen quality. (Take the No. 7 train to 33d Street.)2. Socrates Sculpture Park, Long Island City 718-956-1819. Breathtaking views of Manhattan, and art you can climb on. (On weekends, take a shuttle bus from Noguchi or MoMA.)3. Uncle George's, Astoria 718-626-0593. Just one of dozens of Athenian tavernas in this Greek neighborhood. Feast on cheese pies and roasted goat. (Take the N train to Broadway.)4. The Unisphere and the Queens Museum, Flushing 718-592-9700. The site of the 1964 World's Fair also boasts a scale model of New York City. (Take the No. 7 train to 111th Street.)5. Ben Faremo, the Lemon Ice King of Corona 718-699-5133. Cherry, blueberry, pina...
  • Design: Sitting Pretty

    The movie business has Cannes; office furniture has NeoCon, a three-day extravaganza in Chicago, Illinois. At last week's event, companies fought to unseat Herman Miller's iconic Aeron chair as the top choice of style-conscious executives. Did they succeeed? Tip Sheet put each one through the tush test.Life, by KnollLife's makers compare the Aeron to Darth Vader: black and robotic. Life is more organic, conforming to the body naturally, without the use of knobs and levers. Petite women may have trouble getting it to recline.#19, by AllsteelIt says it's part human: 18 components, plus the user. Get it? It has a comfy seat that elevates as you recline, for a great stretch. But the plastic frame around the back tends to dig into the neck.Aeron, Herman MillerIt may have more knobs and levers than a cockpit--but nothing beats the taut springiness of its mesh seat and back. Still, Herman Miller is not sitting idly by: an Aeron II is due out this fall.Footnote: Even a concrete bench will...
  • The Insidious Spread Of A Killer Virus

    Doctors have told Saeed Taha that he has only weeks to live. The 48-year-old electrician is sprawled on a Cairo hospital bed with tubes connected, seemingly, to every major vein and artery. A decade ago he was diagnosed with hepatitis C. Overcome with fatigue, the father of three quit his job and spent his life's savings on interferon, one of two drugs approved to fight the virus. But it didn't help. "Don't believe what is said about medicine and doctors," he says. "In this disease nothing makes a difference."On the next bed lies Abdullah El-Shahhat, 70, who was diagnosed four months ago but already displays the swollen legs and belly characteristic of liver disease. The two are among the 15 to 25 percent of Egyptians infected with hepatitis C--the highest rate of any country in the world. Many contracted it in the same way as Taha: through a government-sponsored campaign begun in 1961 to fight the tropical disease schistosomiasis. Medical workers injected millions of Egyptians with...
  • The Dish On Diners

    The preacher was break-dancing. "Save Jones Diner!... Save Jones Diner!" We chanted along, some imitating his break-dance moves, all of us packed cheek to cheek into a tiny, subway-car-sized eatery in lower Manhattan. The Rev. Billy is no priest, but then I'm no social activist, either. Yet here we are, he a performance artist who dresses up like Father, the rest of us friends of the 'hood, rallying to rescue a 64-year-old diner from urban extinction. George W. Bush wouldn't know an evil axis until he's met Cafeteria, a hipster restaurant armed with pricey attorneys and a celebrity publicist best known for nearly running down a Hamptons nightclub bouncer after allegedly calling him "white trash." Its owners plan to knock down Jones Diner and erect a three-story behemoth in its place.This being New York, the neighbors are outraged. "The Jones Diner is the soul of the neighborhood," a little old lady whispers to me. She's sitting on one of those twirly stools at the counter. She and I...
  • SCHOOL BY THE BOOK

    Two dozen soldiers stand guard at the main gate of Istanbul University. They are posted there every day to watch the students walk through the great Ottoman arch. The troops will stop any young woman student who dares wrap her head in a scarf, any male student with a turban. Violators risk expulsion--it's the law. The country's leaders have been trying to suppress radical Islam ever since the birth of the Turkish Republic, back in 1923. They believe (not without reason) that some militant clerics would gladly return the country to the Middle Ages if they could. Is the threat really bad enough to warrant a ban on head scarves in class, enforced by a platoon of armed troops? "That's something new," says one 31-year-old lecturer in modern Turkish literature. "It shows that the government is afraid."The confrontations in the 19th-century archway are tiny skirmishes in a struggle that spans the Islamic world. On one side are Muslims who believe in the value of secular institutions. On...