Cathleen McGuigan

Stories by Cathleen McGuigan

  • Wtc Memorial: How Should We Remember?

    The eloquent simplicity of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial changed forever the idea of what a place for collective mourning should be. The eight finalist designs for the World Trade Center Memorial, unveiled last week, had a lot to live up to. But their designers also had a lot to contend with: complex requirements for a site in the midst of a dense, noisy city--and constituents ranging from victims' families to politicians to future visitors yet to be born. So all eight finalists (most are young and unknown) produced overly elaborate designs, with layers of spaces and symbols, using some combination of water, light and gardens. None is anywhere near perfect, but they contain promising ideas.Last August a 13-member jury (including Vietnam memorial designer Maya Lin) began reviewing all 5,201 submissions in the blind competition. After they secretly chose the finalists five weeks ago, each team got $130,000 to refine its design and develop models and animation (view them at WTC Site...
  • Snap Judgement: Books

    Sniper by Sari Horwitz and Michael E. RuaneThis thorough recounting of October 2002's D.C.-area sniper spree earns the book its subtitle: "Inside the Hunt for the Killers Who Terrorized the Nation." Horwitz and Ruane, reporters at The Washington Post (NEWSWEEK's parent company), can get so inside that the story occasionally bogs down. One victim gets shot "through vertebra T7." Still, the authors empty their notebooks to thrilling effect--especially in detailing the massive nighttime sting operation at the rest stop where the accused snipers were finally caught.The Creative Habit by Twyla TharpAn entertaining "how to" guide, "The Creative Habit" isn't about getting the lightning bolt of inspiration but rather the artistic necessity of old-fashioned virtues such as discipline, preparation and routine. While Tharp draws heavily on her own experience as a choreographer, the book is peppered with anecdotes about everyone from Mozart to Philip Roth. "Art is a vast democracy of habit,"...
  • The Gospel Of Richard

    I think designers are the alchemists of the future," says Richard Koshalek. He's perched on the edge of an orange leather chair in his glass-walled office at Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, Calif. The office is a cheerful clutter of magazines--he subscribes to 60--and pinned-up sketches by such architect friends as Frank Gehry and Tadao Ando. "We want to train our students not only in tangible skills but in intangibles," he continues. "We want them to make valuable contributions. It's no longer the lone genius in a closed room obsessing over an object. Designers have to open themselves up to the world." The natty Koshalek, 62, is soft-spoken, but he talks a mile a minute and he's just warming to his subject. Since he took over as president of the school four years ago, he's been working to turn an institution best known for training car designers (like J Mays, who redesigned the Beetle and the Thunderbird) into a force for grappling with humanitarian issues, locally and...
  • The Mcmansion Next Door

    Design is everywhere, right? Your toothbrush, your running shoes, your cool-looking couch, your latte machine, your laptop. OK, no one would mistake Indiana for Italy, but you can finally buy good design almost anywhere, from the mall to the Internet. But there's one big-ticket item in this country that is virtually untouched by the hand of a good designer: your house.Most new off-the-rack houses aren't so much designed as themed: Mediterranean, French country, faux Tudor, neo-Colonial. These houses may offer--on the high end--every option money can buy, from a media room to a separate shower for the dog. But the market actually gives consumers little true choice: the developer house, in most price ranges, is amazingly similar from coast to coast, across different climate zones and topographies. If you ripped off the roofs--and the turrets and gables and fake widow's walks--or peered into the windows--double-hung, round, Palladian, picture (often in the same house!)--you'd find...
  • Building Up

    Shanghai is a city with a split personality. In little more than a decade its modern financial district, Pudong, has sprouted dozens of shiny glass-and-steel skyscrapers--most of them mundane, and a few over the top, such as the Pearl Oriental Tower, adorned by two pink balls that sparkle like costume jewelry on the skyline. Across the Huangpu River in old Shanghai, the monumental 19th-century colonial buildings of the Bund stand like dowagers at a fancy-dress ball. Yet even here cranes hover over almost every neighborhood--threatening even the elegant art deco villas of the French Concession. In Beijing there's a similar clash between old and new: east of the historic Forbidden City, plans are underway for the vast new Central Business District. And all over the city, the Chinese character chai--meaning "destroy"--is painted on the walls of old houses, spelling doom for the gnarly web of hutongs, or traditional alleyways.China's two greatest cities are struggling with modern design...
  • Deep In The Art Of Texas

    Back in the spring of 1999, Dallas real-estate developer Ray Nasher paid a visit to the Italian architect Renzo Piano at Piano's spectacular studio high above the Mediterranean outside Genoa. With his late wife, Patsy, Nasher had assembled what is arguably the greatest collection of modern sculpture in private hands: 350 indoor and outdoor pieces by the likes of Rodin and Giacometti, Picasso and Matisse, Henry Moore and Joan Miro. Museums had shamelessly courted him for his legacy--the National Gallery in Washington was one suitor, as were the Guggenheim in New York and the Dallas Museum of Art--but in the end, Nasher decided to build his own space. By that spring, Piano had begun to plot out a private urban garden and small museum. A simple project, it would seem--glass and travertine, grass and trees, a backdrop for great art.Exquisite simplicity isn't easy to pull off. But when the Nasher Sculpture Center opens its doors later this month, downtown Dallas--with its flashy...
  • A MIGHTY MONUMENT TO MUSIC

    When the conductor of the Los Angeles Philharmonic, Esa-Pekka Salonen, took the podium of the new Walt Disney Concert Hall one morning in late June, anticipation hung in the air. Fewer than a dozen people were scattered about the 2,265-seat auditorium, including the architect, Frank Gehry. Outside, the gorgeous billowing curves and swoops of the nearly finished stainless-steel exterior--already an L.A. landmark--shimmered. Yet this stunning building will truly succeed only if the quality of its sound matches its physical beauty. That June day marked the first time the full orchestra had played in the new hall. Salonen led the musicians into the opening bars of Mozart's Jupiter Symphony, but he soon tapped his baton, stopped and scanned the hall for Gehry. "Frank," he said, "we'll keep it." Gehry started crying.Several months earlier Gehry got so anxious about how the place would sound that he called Salonen at home one evening and asked to meet him at the unfinished hall right away....
  • MOVIES: A REAL-LIFE HORROR

    A teen girl is raped and her family has her locked up in a prison. This sounds like life in a developing country ruled by religious extremists, but such events took place in modern-day Ireland. The harrowing new film "The Magdalene Sisters" follows four women in the 1960s who are committed to a Roman Catholic asylum in Dublin, where they work as slave labor in a laundry, brutalized psychologically and physically by the nuns who mean to save their souls. The movie, condemned by the Vatican after it won the Venice Film Festival last fall, has already stirred audiences in Ireland. But on the eve of its opening here, the American branch of the Sisters of Mercy--one of the orders that ran the asylums--issued an unusual statement. The asylums "represent a time in the history of the Catholic Church... of which we are not proud... we grieve with all victims of the Magdalene Laundries." At least 30,000 women were inmates from the mid-19th century until the last asylum closed in 1996. Though...
  • The Mother Of All Mary Tyrones

    We've been in this seaside house before, with the gulls calling outside the windows, the sun-faded upholstery redolent of happier summers. Usually Eugene O'Neill's semi-autobiographical household is dominated by the explosive, penny-pinching Irish patriarch James Tyrone. But in Robert Falls's revelatory production of "Long Day's Journey Into Night," which opened on Broadway last week, the balance has shifted to the mother, Mary Tyrone, due to the illuminating performance of Vanessa Redgrave. This fragile, drug-addicted woman is slowly losing her grip on reality--right down to her arthritic fingers, which nervously tuck in wanton strands of hair or smooth the brow of her sickly son Edmund, played with a quiet intensity by Robert Sean Leonard. As his dissipated brother, Jamie, the edgy Philip Seymour Hoffman fits in this ensemble surprisingly well, though his last drunken rage seems more noisy than authentic. Of course, the play's dialogue bristles with anger, retribution and remorse-...
  • Design's Hip Diva Hits America's Heartland

    Zaha Hadid has waited a long time for her moment. Twenty years ago the Baghdad-born, London-based architect won a competition for a fancy Hong Kong club: her amazing design, a "horizontal skyscraper," called for four huge beams to be rammed into a mountainside, yet it looked as sleek as a UFO. It was a scheme of such edgy virtuosity that it made it into a show at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, but was never built. Her radical ideas challenged such musty notions of building as right angles ("There are 360 degrees, so why stick to one?"), and her unbuilt designs--expressed in her paintings of jagged angles and overlapping spaces--were almost impossible to decipher. So Zaha, as everyone calls her, found herself pigeonholed as one of those avant-garde architects--Rem Koolhaas and Daniel Libeskind were two others--famous mostly for being famous.Today Hadid is still turning convention on its head--but she's producing practical architecture at the same time. "I'm challenging...
  • A Red-Hot Mama Rose

    Stage whispers of doubt surrounded the Broadway revival of "Gypsy" before it opened last week. Could the gifted but girlish Bernadette Peters possibly pull off the role created by big, brassy Ethel Merman as the monstrous Mama Rose? (Peters, amazingly, is 55--four years older than Merman was when "Gypsy" premiered in 1959.) Well, Peters succeeds big time--in part by bringing some unexpected dimensions to the mother of all stage mothers. Her Mama is tough as toe shoes but also a little sexy. Rose may not care much for passion--three husbands have left her--but she's not above showing off a still-shapely figure if she thinks a man can help her daughters to stardom. And when Peters unleashes Mama's big numbers--"Everything's Coming Up Roses" and "Rose's Turn"--you can see flashes of heartbreak beneath the steely hide.Maybe a musical about the dying days of vaudeville doesn't sound cool. But under the taut direction of Sam Mendes, "Gypsy" seems fresh. It remains the quintessential story...
  • Why Should We Care?

    While Europeans were still swinging stone clubs, the peoples of Mesopotamia were swinging into gear. By around 3000 B.C., they had invented everything from writing to irrigation. Kings and queens dressed to kill in gorgeous golden jewelry, studded with lapis and carnelian--or dressed to die, since this is how archeologists found them in their tombs. Their artwork depicts--often with delicacy--the detail of daily life and holy ceremony. Until a month or so ago, the best of the best from that early civilization, in what is now Iraq, was in Baghdad's National Museum. That's why scholars around the world have been so upset by the museum's looting in the last days of the war.This week the American public can discover firsthand why all of us should care about a trashed museum half a world away. The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York is opening "Art of the First Cities," a long-planned show of ancient treasure from the region--and Met curator Joan Aruz admits the coincidental timing...
  • Prada, Yada, Yada: A Wintour's Tale

    Here comes The Devil Wears Prada, sashaying down the runway and up the best-seller lists. The roman a clef about a fashion magazine is sure to be the summer's hottest beach accessory. Lauren Weisberger--a former assistant to Anna Wintour, the pencil-thin Brit who edits Vogue--got a huge advance (more than $200,000) and even bigger movie deal for her literary debut. Her doppelgnger is Andrea, who works grueling hours for the icy, impossibly demanding Miranda Priestly--a pencil-thin Brit who edits a fashion bible. The devil here is really in the details. There's dish about the lavish perks--from couture dry cleaning to chauffeured cars to free Jimmy Choos--available even to lowly assistants at this fictitious magazine. In one scene an editor named James pulls a bag of designer stuff from the Closet--the repository of castoffs from fashion shoots--and transforms Andrea from a Gap-clad schlub into a chic swan just by squeezing her into a pair of Gucci suede pants worth several thousand...
  • If You'd Build It

    The bullish '90s spawned big plans for American museums wanting to bask in the "Bilbao effect": hire a global design star like Frank Gehry and get a lot of attention. But now that the economy has tanked, some of the most ambitious designs will never leave the drawing board. The latest victim: the Rem Koolhaas scheme for a major addition to the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York. When the Dutch architect's design was too costly to build, he created a more modest version. Neither will be built. "Rem's proposals were brilliant and they were practical," says Whitney director Maxwell Anderson. "But our short-term needs now are going to be about building the endowment, not the facility." Koolhaas, whose U.S. projects include the over-the-top Prada store in Manhattan, has had a run of bad luck: his radical plan for overhauling the ungainly Los Angeles County Museum of Art was put in the deep freeze after voters defeated a bond issue in November. Other museums are paring down. The...
  • Down From The Clouds

    One of the most-talked-about works of architecture last year wasn't exactly designed to keep the rain out--in fact, visitors were advised to wear trench coats. The "Blur Building" consisted mainly of a platform over Switzerland's Lake Neuchatel and a cloud of fog generated by 31,500 tiny computer-controlled nozzles. Blur was a huge hit with both critics and the million ordinary people who walked through it at Swiss Expo 2002. That cross-over is the key to the work of Blur's designers, Diller + Scofidio, the supercool architectural theorists (and MacArthur-certified geniuses) who've been darlings of New York's downtown intelligentsia for years. Yes, we could go on about the deeper meanings of Blur--the dematerialization of culture, the evanescence of the man-made. But let's just say the project was a total gas.The husband-and-wife team of Elizabeth Diller, 48, and Ricardo Scofidio, 67, have built almost no conventional structures, but they express their cleverly subversive ideas in...
  • Daniel Libeskind Takes Home The Prize

    You have to catch Daniel Libeskind on the fly these days. The once obscure architect--a revered avant-garde theorist who spent the first 20 years of his career without building so much as a birdhouse--was a besieged New York celebrity last week. Right after the press conference where his winning design for the World Trade Center site was praised by Gov. George Pataki, Mayor Michael Bloomberg and other public officials (most of whom probably hadn't heard of him six months ago), Libeskind disappeared into a thicket of TV cameras and microphone booms, then was whisked away by a phalanx of PR guys, as if he were Puffy Combs encircled by his entourage.When he emerged from his bouquet-filled hotel room, even the desk clerk offered congratulations. He leaped into a Town Car and headed to Fox TV for a live appearance, then squeezed in a phone interview with The New York Times. He did admit he was enjoying the fuss. "Yes, yes," he nodded, his eyes bright behind black-framed specs, his...
  • Think Again

    The frenzy last week when architect Daniel Libeskind won the competition to design the World Trade Center site was unprecedented. Here was an avant-garde architect who was suddenly the hottest "get" for any TV show in New York.In Berlin--though a U.S. citizen, he's been based there for the last dozen years--his office had hundreds of media requests from around the globe. We're a shamelessly celebrity-driven culture, and when we run low on idols from the world of movies or politics, we create new ones. And the instant our latest architect-hero grabbed the big prize, we completely forgot those other guys from the team THINK, who came this close--as the gossip pages like to print--to becoming the winners instead.Unlike Libeskind's proposal, the THINK plan wasn't an early favorite, but the team scheme for two lacy towers gained more and more support. When the seven semifinalist teams unveiled their initial schemes right before Christmas, THINK--a group led by architects Rafael Vinoly...
  • And Now, The Finals

    Last week, after long and intense private debate and public speculation, officials in charge of redeveloping the World Trade Center site formally chose two design teams from a field of seven to compete to create a master plan. But there wasn't much time for architect Daniel Libeskind of Berlin, or the THINK team (headed by New York-based architects Rafael Vinoly and Frederic Schwartz), to pop the champagne corks. Over the next three weeks each team must modify its scheme to deal with such issues as underground infrastructure. One team will be chosen by the end of the month.Libeskind's plan has jagged towers, a spiky spire and a dramatic void all the way down to bedrock for a memorial site; now he may have to make that void smaller and shallower. THINK has a pair of spectacular open towers (eventually with cultural facilities inside), but one tower's footing must be re-engineered because of its proximity to the underground transit system. Changes are inevitable in a project so...
  • A Tale Of Two Towers

    Of all the great art exhibits in New York City, the blockbuster of the season was a complete surprise: the show of competing architectural models for the World Trade Center site. For six weeks, an estimated 80,000 New Yorkers and tourists swarmed the lobby of an office building in lower Manhattan to peer at plans created by seven design teams, chosen in an international competition. Last week, after long and intense debate, officials in charge of redeveloping the site formally selected two finalists: Studio Daniel Libeskind of Berlin and the THINK team, headed by New York-based architects Rafael Vinoly and Frederic Schwartz.One design will be chosen by the end of the month. A committee of officials--representing the Lower Manhattan Development Corporation (charged with overseeing the plans), the Port Authority (which owns the site) and representatives of the governor's and mayor's offices--faces two deeply serious schemes, each with its own inspiring idea to be tested. Libeskind's...
  • A Tale Of Two Towers

    New York City is getting more than its share of great exhibitions these days--Leonardo da Vinci's drawings at the Met; Picasso and Matisse coming to MoMA--but the surprise blockbuster of the season has to be this: the show of competing architectural models for the World Trade Center site. For the past six weeks an estimated 80,000 New Yorkers and tourists have swarmed the lobby of an office building in lower Manhattan to peer at plans created by seven design teams, chosen in an international competition. Some days, the place gets so jammed--with people chattering in every language from Japanese to Italian--you have to rubberneck to get a decent glimpse. The models are like magical toys, some with moving parts and lights, others with stunning video displays providing a virtual-reality trip into the future. Dads and moms and kids crouch low against the glass-front cases and look down the tiny streets, trying to imagine they were one of those eensy silver figures striding through a...
  • Rem's Chinese Puzzle

    In China, there's a race to construct the world's tallest building. Both the Shanghai World Financial Center (due by 2008) and Union Square in Hong Kong (to open in 2007) will top out at more than 1,500 feet into the clouds. But in Beijing, height isn't everything. Just before Christmas, officials of CCTV, the country's flagship television network, unveiled a design for their new headquarters by the Dutch architect Rem Koolhaas that redefines the skyscraper. At 750 feet it seems comparatively puny, but its 5.5 million square feet of floor space (as much as one of the Twin Towers) snake into a squared-off loop that links the various functions of CCTV into a continuum. And its stunning silhouette, with amazing turns and cantilevers, makes it unlike anything on any urban skyline. Like a lot of people, Koolhaas has been mulling over skyscrapers since 9-11. "It's a kind of unconscious working out of issues," he says. "How can you make a high-rise building that's not about height? How can...
  • Dreamscapes

    The weather outside was icy, but inside, 250 journalists were gathered under an incongruous umbrella of palm trees in the atrium of a Manhattan office complex to see the latest schemes for rebuilding the World Trade Center site. Last week was the first glimmer of hope that something good for the city could emerge from September 11. A year ago New York Gov. George Pataki established the Lower Manhattan Development Corporation to oversee the rebuilding. The agency has bungled the effort more than once. Last summer the public gave its first set of plans a resounding Bronx cheer, prompting the LMDC to hold an international competition for new designs. From more than 400 entries, it chose six teams of designers (a seventh firm, LMDC consultants Peterson/Littenberg, was added later). The new designs have sparked global interest, making the front pages in Europe and generating 30 million hits on the LMDC Web site in the first 36 hours.The most futuristic aspects of the schemes are in the...
  • Incredible Lightness

    The Japanese architect Tadao Ando is sitting in a noisy Tex-Mex place in Ft. Worth, confronting his first enchilada. On the many trips he's made from Osaka to Texas to oversee the construction of his new Modern Art Museum here, he's always dined on the best local beef. But it's Sunday, and his favorite steakhouse is closed. Ando eyes the cheese-smothered mass warily and passes on the refried beans and guacamole. And no wonder. Not to make too writerly a leap here, but those messy, if delicious, dishes are the antithesis of the Ando esthetic. His buildings tend to be pure geometric compositions of discrete ingredients: concrete, stone, glass, steel, wood. But no one would call his architecture meat-and-potatoes. The word you hear most often is "spiritual."And what's spiritual these days, if not museums? They're our cathedrals, as cultural pundits like to say. Which makes the opening this week of Ando's Ft. Worth museum a transcendently big deal. Ando has long been famous among design...
  • Hotels: Beyond The Bathrobe

    Not so long ago, all anyone wanted from a hotel was comfort, cleanliness and a nice fluffy bathrobe. But these days, the most crucial amenity a hotel has to offer is its cool factor. Hotels have become the frontier of drop-dead style--which is the main point of "New Hotels for Global Nomads," a new exhibit on display through March 2003 at the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum in New York. Ian Schrager jump-started the trend when he signed up chic French designers Andree Putnam and Philippe Starck to create his boutique hotels in the '80s and '90s. These days some of the coolest hotels are in revamped modern high-rises, such as Andre Balazs's swanky Standard Hotel in Los Angeles in the 1956 Superior Oil building or the sleek Loews Philadelphia in the 1932 Philadelphia Saving Fund Society. But some of the most breathtaking displays are from hotels that don't even exist--yet. Take Lindy Roy's Wind River Lodge in Alaska, an extreme ski resort (as yet unbuilt) that will be reachable...
  • Design: He's The Man With The Plan

    This year's Chrysler Design Awards weren't about who'd created the coolest chair but, rather, who had backed the best in design behind the scenes. Of the six honorees, the elder statesman, in every sense, was Daniel Patrick Moynihan, 75. The New Yorker served four presidents before spending 24 years as a U.S. senator, much of it as chairman of the committee on public works. His role as design booster began in 1962 with a document he wrote in the Kennedy administration called "Guiding Principles for Federal Architecture." He spoke with Cathleen McGuigan.How did you get design on the federal agenda?During the Inaugural parade in 1961, President Kennedy rode up Pennsylvania Avenue and waved left and right, as it were. And he noticed, to the right, there was just nothing there. The city had emptied out--in literal fact, there was only one residence between the Capitol and 15th Street. The president said, this doesn't look like a capital. We made up a commission on Pennsylvania Avenue,...
  • L.A. Rising

    If you stand on the rooftop terrace of the chic new Standard hotel in downtown Los Angeles, you might think you're in a real city. From the top of the 12-story high-rise conversion--built in 1956 as the headquarters of Superior Oil--you look out at a glittering forest of glass-and-steel towers. The scene on the roof is jammed and noisy, as cool twentysomethings jostle for elbow room at the bar or colonize the red podlike cabanas by the pool. But it's not real--it's more like a movie. If you go down to the swanky Standard lobby, with its marble floors and hot pink sofas, and walk outside, the bubble bursts. The streets don't bustle like Chicago's or New York's--they're dark and empty. The Standard's stylish urbanity is a goof on the visions of long-dead tycoons, who once powwowed next door at the elite California Club and who built this part of town--which, with its formal brand of sleek corporate modernism, is irrelevant to the culture of pink stucco and palm trees that we think of...
  • Movin' To Broadway

    In Twyla Tharp's very first public performance, back in 1965, she danced briefly to Petula Clark's pop hit "Downtown." No one covered the event. "I was really pissed," Tharp recalled over breakfast last week, still sounding a little irritated. "I would've taken a really foul review." Since then, Tharp has continued to blast the boundaries between high and low art. She put ballerinas in tennis shoes, and choreographed for American Ballet Theater. She made dances for movies and her own company, using music by Mozart or the Beach Boys with equal flair. No one ignores her now. This week Tharp faces the critics again when she opens "Movin' Out," a hugely ambitious $8 million Broadway show she conceived, choreographed and directed to the music of Mr. "Uptown Girl," Billy Joel.Both Tharp and Joel are quick to say that "Movin' Out" is not a musical in the conventional sense. "We can't come up with a name for what this is," says Tharp. "This is not a book musical; we do not have book scenes....
  • Always Engaging Eloise

    It's been almost 50 years since "Eloise" made her first appearance and quickly became the most famous fictional guest at New York's Plaza Hotel, beloved by "children of all ages."After the first book, the mischievous little girl's adventures continued in two books set in Paris and Moscow (during the cold war) as well as one about Christmas at the Plaza. Then she disappeared. But Eloise's author, Kay Thompson (also an actress-singer who starred in the movie "Funny Face" with Audrey Hepburn and Fred Astaire), did have one more book up her very chic sleeve: "Eloise Takes a Bawth."Still, Thompson was eccentric. Not only did she let all but the original "Eloise" books go out of print--despite their success--she also canceled publication of "Bawth" just before it was going to press in 1964. "She said she didn't like it," recalls illustrator Hilary Knight, whose adorably funny line drawings contributed as much to Eloise's impish persona as Thompson's words. "I agreed with her--I knew it...
  • Books Watch Out, Bridget--Here Comes Kate Reddy

    The sharpest wit in Brit lit since Bridget Jones is about to invade our shores. Kate Reddy, a thirtysomething London hedge-fund manager and mother of two small children, is the narrator of Allison Pearson's first novel, "I Don't Know How She Does It." Kate spends more time on planes than the playground and nurses a sense of guilt as enormous as her ambition. What makes her tale such a hoot are the spot-on details that crowd her life and her brain--and will be familiar to any woman reader who's ever tried to dress a squirming toddler while calling the office to explain why she's late. Where Bridget Jones had her failed-self-improvement diary entries (weight gained, cigarettes sneaked), Kate has her failed "to do" lists ("Must Remember: Get dishwasher fixed... Emily schools NOW!... Change computer password... Paula's birthday, damn!... Ginseng for better memory or ginko thingy?"). Kate can wow a roomful of Wall Street traders with her fund's pitch but has to fake homemade strawberry...
  • Filling The Void

    One year after the terrorist attacks, the place where the Twin Towers once loomed looks like any big-city construction site. Swept clean of the last pieces of twisted steel, the 16 acres now thrum with the noise of bulldozers and cranes as work goes on to rebuild underground subway lines. Near the southeast corner of Ground Zero is one unofficial monument: a simple cross forged by workmen from two pieces of those once mighty steel columns. Gone are the twin beams of the Tribute in Light, which soared into the night sky last spring. Now tourists--thousands a day--clog the perimeter of the site. Some are quiet and reverent, others smile for the family video camera or wolf down hot dogs. Two weeks ago crews began erecting a special mesh fence--rather than plywood--to give visitors a better view when the reconstruction actually begins.But exactly what will be built there is still anyone's guess. One of the many remarkable stories of the last year is how public opinion, galvanized by the...