Christopher Dickey

Stories by Christopher Dickey

  • Barred, Not Stopped

    Yeah, that's England," says Reza, a 22-year-old political-science student from Afghanistan. He has no passport, and doesn't want his last name to be published. Reza has traveled four months from Kabul, by foot across the border into Pakistan, from there to Iran, from Iran to Turkey. A friend lost a leg to a land mine at that crossing, he says. From Turkey to Greece, Greece to Italy. And now he is near the French village of Sangatte, on the edge of the English Channel. Before him, huge ferries glide across the gray water, and the white cliffs of Dover rise on the edge of the horizon.With Reza on this hill are hundreds of other migrants in a vast hangar where components for the channel tunnel in nearby Calais used to be manufactured. The French Red Cross established a shelter here at the request of local officials, who were overwhelmed by clandestins, or illegal immigrants, camping out in local parks. "For the last two or three years the situation was completely out of control," says...
  • The New People Trade

    Yeah, that's England," says Reza, a 22-year-old political-science student from Afghanistan. He has no passport, no "papers," as they say in Europe, and though he's willing to provide a reporter with his family name and e-mail address, he asks that they not be published. Reza paid smugglers $6,000 to escort him on a four-month journey from Kabul, by foot across the border into Pakistan, and from there to Iran. While crossing from Iran to Turkey, a friend lost a leg to a land mine, he says. Reza pressed on to Greece, then Italy. Now he's near the French village of Sangatte, on the edge of the English Channel. In front of him, huge ferries glide across the gray water, and the white cliffs of Dover, clearly visible in the morning light, rise on the edge of the horizon.There lies the land where Reza plans to begin a new life. Yes, he knows that 58 Chinese died in the airless oven of a tomato truck that was smuggling them to Dover a few days earlier. But still, he plans to make a similar...
  • Where Blood Runs Cold

    Imagine a huge mafia funeral. Some mourners cry from grief, others from fear, others from relief. And soon after the burial, among the closest relatives the talk turns to the Family and its future. So it was at Syrian dictator Hafez Assad's interment last week. His eldest surviving son, Bashar, like a reluctant Michael Corleone in "The Godfather," had suddenly inherited all the responsibilities and dangers attendant on the clan. And Bashar, 34, is a bachelor. Who would he take as a wife? Which family would he join to his?These were more than peripheral concerns for members of the Assad dynasty, and yet they weren't the most immediate issues to be dealt with. (We'll return to the question of an eligible bride later.) First there was the fight over the family inheritance. Hafez Assad had carefully prepared his political will to ensure the dictatorship went to Bashar. But Hafez's brother Rifaat has always thought the presidential palace should be his--he tried to seize power from his...
  • Mini-Mu, Football Star

    Think of him as Muammar Kaddafi, Soccer Dad. Sure, the oil-rich Libyan dictator has been accused of everything from concocting chemical weapons to blowing up an American airliner over Lockerbie, Scotland, in 1988. But that doesn't mean he's not a proud father. And if his boy wants to play soccer, then his boy's going to get the best coaching that money can buy. Want to play in the big leagues? Go for it, son!So it is that Saadi Muammar Kaddafi, a 26-year-old striker of average talent, is surrounded by some of the biggest names in international sports. Among his friends is the convalescing Brazilian superstar Ronaldo, who's given him his shoes for luck. Saadi's been advised by Argentina's troubled demigod, Diego Maradona. Sprinter Ben Johnson, presumably sans steroids, is his personal trainer. And former England coach Terry Venables is in talks with the Libyan national team, on which Saadi plays.Dad seems happy to pay. Johnson gets a reported $120,000 a month. The British press...
  • The Legacy Of An Arab Survivor

    Hafez Assad was never very good at war. Though he built up a huge army, Assad lost the Golan Heights to Israel in 1967 as Syria's Defense minister and failed to win them back in 1973 as the nation's leader. He later saw his entire Air Force wiped out over Lebanon. Assad was no great shakes at peace either. From the '70s on he found himself outflanked as his old partner, Egyptian President Anwar Sadat, made a separate deal with Israel that left him stranded, and his hated rival, Palestinian leader Yasir Arafat, paced past him in peace talks. What Assad was very good at was survival. During his 30 years at the top, as his Soviet allies collapsed, Sadat was assassinated and Israeli prime ministers came and went, Assad cunningly managed to consolidate control in Damascus while he waited to get the Golan back. And in doing so he became the key holdout in the protracted Mideast peace process.This year it seemed that, finally, Hafez Assad's time had come. As the clock ticked over into the...
  • 'Neutralizing' The Bad Guys

    When a deranged immigrant took 46 little children and six nursery-school teachers hostage in Wasserbillig, Luxembourg, last week, officials said they would try to "neutralize" him. For nearly 30 hours they negotiated with Tunisian-born Neji Bejaoui, 39, a black belt in karate who had a history of domestic violence and mental illness, according to police. They brought his psychiatrist into the talks. They heard Bejaoui tell how distraught he had been since his own children were taken from him by social workers in 1994. But negotiations seemed to be going nowhere. So a police team disguised as journalists from a Luxembourg television station lured Bejaoui out into the open for an interview he had been requesting. He is said to have been holding a hostage child under one arm, and a grenade in his free hand. The police opened fire, and dropped Bejaoui with two bullets. The child escaped unhurt. "The goal was to neutralize him," Luxembourg's Interior Minister Michel Wolter told NEWSWEEK....
  • The Spectacle Of Cannes

    The dark clouds, the heavy rain, the soggy stars--not the brightest beginning for the 53d Cannes Film Festival last week. And behind the scenes: another tempest. Gilles Jacob, the man who's picked the movies for the competition since 1978, reneged on his decision to resign the programming post this year, and fired Olivier Barrot, a French-television cultural correspondent he'd named to replace him.Messy stuff, even by Cannes standards. But with a record 23 films in competition, 30,000 accredited attendees and a new Riviera complex for the ever-expanding film market (the world's largest), this is the biggest, richest and most varied festival ever to grace the Croisette, as the beachside boulevard is called. Of course, Cannes is still the festival everyone loves to loathe. Listen to all the griping on the terrace of the Hotel Majestic and you'd think the hangovers had begun before the parties. The egos are too big, the critics say, and the films are too little. Blockbusters needn't...
  • Who's Really On Trial?

    Danny Tefileen's family gathered before the massive stones of Jerusalem's Western Wall last week to pray for his deliverance. He and 12 other Iranian Jews are standing trial in the ancient Persian city of Shiraz on charges that they spied for Israel.Iranian authorities have held the alleged spies in jail for 14 months. Last week videotaped interviews with Tefileen and two others confessing to the charges were broadcast on Iranian television. In Israel, virtually no one believes they are guilty. According to friends and relatives, Tefileen and several of the other defendants merely taught Hebrew language and culture. The Israeli government has flatly denied the espionage allegations. The United States and Europe have put Iran on notice that they expect nothing less than a scrupulously fair trial. But the accused may yet be sentenced to death. At the Western Wall, Tefileen's two sisters shook with sobs as they listened to Chief Rabbi Yisrael Meir Lau address himself to the Iranian...
  • At Last, A Shot At Justice

    Libyan defendants, Scottish judges, American families of the dead and the first of thousands of witnesses come together in a makeshift Dutch courtroom this week to see if justice can be done--or begin to be done--in the terrorist bombing of Pan American Flight 103 more than 11 years ago. The trial will certainly be long, several months at least, and already there are signs that when it is over, the verdict may be far from clear.Pan Am 103 blew up in the sky over Lockerbie, Scotland, on Dec. 21, 1988, killing 189 Americans and 81 others in the plane and on the ground. After combing hundreds of square miles of Scottish countryside and following the evidence across Europe, investigators identified two Libyan suspects, Abdel Basset Ali Mohamed al-Megrahi and Lamen Khalifa Fhima, who worked for the Libyan airline--and reportedly for Libyan intelligence. The country's strongman, Muammar Kaddafi, was persuaded to hand them over for trial after receiving assurances that his government's...
  • A Long Delay For Justice

    Libyan defendants, Scottish judges, families of the dead and the first of thousands of witnesses come together in a makeshift Dutch courtroom this week to see if justice can be done--or begin to be done--in the terrorist bombing of Pan American Flight 103 more than 11 years ago. The trial will certainly be long, several months at least, and already there are signs that when it is over, the verdict may be far from clear.Pan Am 103 blew up in the sky over Lockerbie, Scotland, on Dec. 21, 1988, killing all 259 people aboard and 11 on the ground. After combing hundreds of square miles of Scottish countryside and following the evidence across Europe, investigators identified two Libyan suspects, Abdel Basset Ali Mohamed al-Megrahi and Lamen Khalifa Fhima, who worked for the Libyan airline--and reportedly for Libyan intelligence. The country's strongman, Muammar Kaddafi, was persuaded to hand them over for trial after receiving assurances that his government's alleged support for the...
  • France Takes Off

    When 27-year-old Michel Meyer learned last Friday morning that the Internet company he founded in 1995 was flirting with a $1 billion capitalization on the French stock market, he decided it was time to pop the champagne corks. He'd been to Silicon Valley in the early 1990s. He knew this kind of thing could happen there. But in France such high-speed success was unheard of until recently, and for all practical purposes, so was the Web. Meyer had set up a chat site called The Virtual Baguette. He wanted to build it into a French-language portal called Multimania. But very few financiers would listen. "When we came back five years ago and said what we were going to do," he recalled with a broad smile, "everybody said, 'Well, good luck, guys'."Well, good luck --and hard work--have paid off. But not just for Meyer. France has experienced such a turnaround in its fortunes over the past two years that the whole country seems to be caught up in the excitement. You could see it in the faint...
  • All The News All The Time

    There's no question about the biggest winner in last week's Iranian elections: the Iranian press. It's wild. It's irreverent. It's brutal and amusing, and unabashedly partisan. It's constantly under pressure, its editors are sued and jailed, it's being shut down all the time--and it just keeps going.In a nation where political parties are only beginning to take shape, Iran's newspapers have become the signposts guiding people through the fields of candidates. In Tehran alone, there are at least 35 newspapers published every day, all pushing their own line, whether liberal or conservative, reformist or radical. "We're a hero-making factory," says Hamidreza Jalaei Pour, editor of the reformist Asr-Azadegan (Time of the Free). "And we are free. Really, we are free. But--" he reflects a moment--"we are unsettled."In another country, in fact, outspoken editors like Jalaei Pour might consider themselves downright persecuted. When religious conservatives allied to Supreme Leader Ali...
  • The Reform Vote

    Iranians, especially young Iranians, voted for change last week. At a polling station reserved for women in working-class South Tehran, 18-year-old Mitra Allaverdi picked "new faces" for Iran's Parliament. "I think all the men elected before did not do good things for us," she said. Downtown near the old American Embassy (still called "the nest of spies"), graduate student Ramazan Ali said proudly, "I'm shaping my future with my own hands." Across town at the Jalili Mosque, 19-year-old Somaya Arabi said, "God willing, these elections will stop the country from being ruined. If only the politicians will keep their promises."In Iran, as elsewhere, that's an enormous "if." The ultraconservative mullahs who have dominated the Islamic revolution will not easily be overturned. Led by Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, officially the "Supreme Leader," they may not have the numbers of popular supporters they once had, but they've still got the guns, the courts and the secret police in their hands. The...
  • Ali Fallahian: The Most Feared Mullah in Iran

    Ali Fallahian, perhaps the most feared mullah in Iran, was laughing with a fat man's gusto. He sat on a carpet among his supporters in his Isfahan campaign headquarters, confident he would win a seat in Iran's parliament once results were tabulated from last Friday's elections. From 1989 to 1997, this portly cleric was Iran's minister of intelligence. French and German investigators allege that during that time he was behind the savage murder of the Islamic regime's political opponents abroad. American investigators say his intelligence operation may have been linked to the 1996 bombing of the Khobar apartments in Saudi Arabia, which cost 19 Americans their lives. And inside Iran, Fallahian's top deputy and dozens of subordinates were arrested last year for the murder of four intellectuals in the winter of 1998-1999, after Fallahian left office. The Tehran press claims another 60 to 80 people were killed by Fallahian's people while he was still in power. Speaking through a...
  • Peace Race

    The handshake's the thing. This week President Bill Clinton will bring together the Syrian foreign minister and the prime minister of Israel and, if all goes according to plan, they'll extend their hands for a historic photo op. "The president is very good at smashing two guys together," as one State Department official puts it.Securing a peace deal with Damascus has become a matter of urgency for Israel. The risk is not that war will break out, but that conditions within Syria may soon make it hard to find anyone with whom Israel can cut a deal. At 69, President Hafez Assad reportedly is suffering from heart disease, diabetes and other ailments. The wolves are circling. His younger brother Rifaat Assad, who has spent most of the last 15 years in exile after a bid to seize power, has been floating rumors that he is still the best man to take over. But Assad wants his son Bashar to inherit his mantle. In October Bashar's backers attacked a beachfront mansion and small port in Western...
  • It's Time To Let In Some Light

    Neil Kinnock, the former leader of Britain's Labour Party, was mulling over some of the accusations leveled against him since he was named vice president of the European Commission last summer. "I'm going 'to liquidate people.' I'm going to--what else have they said?--Oh, I'm 'conducting a blitzkrieg.' I'm a mixture of Stalin, Hitler and Thatcher with a little bit of Blair." That's pretty serious name-calling from a bunch of gray-suited bureaucrats. But that's just a sample of the acrimony in Brussels these days as the European Commission is reorganized, the European Union's whole way of doing business is rethought and a lot of time-servers are starting to think that their time is running out.Nobody ever claimed that the job would be easy. Reform has been tried, and failed, more times than any commissioner remembers. Yet despite bitter complaints by a lot of vested interests, some major changes now seem inevitable. Suddenly, at least at the top, "clarity," "simplicity" and ...
  • Tremor Terror

    The mattress was shaking at 2 in the morning, and for a second it felt like the Magic Fingers in a '60s motel room. Except the walls were shaking too. And the ceiling. The Ciragan Palace, one of Turkey's most luxurious hotels, was rocking and rolling. Then everything went still.The tremor last week was a small one, about 4.4 on the Richter scale, and nobody was hurt. But it reminded everyone in Istanbul of last August, when a quake registering 7.4 reduced buildings in the cities of Izmit and Yalova to rubble and dust. More than 17,000 people died.Turkey's Tourism Ministry now estimates that the country has drawn 30 percent fewer foreign vacationers this year than last, because of both the quake and political turmoil. Istanbul alone has lost more than $100 million in tourist revenues. Now the government is launching a $40 million promotional campaign in 32 countries to lure vacationers back. To help draw them, hotels are cutting prices. The popular "holiday villages" have dropped...
  • Telecom's Restless Giants

    What makes the revolution in telecommunications so hard to grasp--let alone predict--is the fact that it's not one, but many revolutions. There's the Internet explosion, of which you've heard (perhaps too) much. There's the mobile-phone uprising, which has just about won the day in Europe and is fast gaining strength in the United States. There are also less obvious revolutions in almost every technical aspect of communications, as copper wire gives way to optical fiber and circuit switches cede ground to packet routers. Flinging themselves into various frays around the world are echelons upon echelons of acronyms and abbreviations, each representing a new technology and its backers. They aim to change the way your coffee pot gets turned on in the morning; whether you see, or virtually see, your boss at work; even the diagnosis of that headache you've had all afternoon and the way you buy a ticket to the movies tonight. We not only communicate through machines, but with them; and...
  • While The Sun Shines

    The government of France is on vacation just now, scattered to the beaches of the Atlantic, the hills of Tuscany, the islands of the Indian Ocean. And the government sets the tone for everyone else. About 80 percent of Parisians abandon the capital in August. Four million cars more than normal hit the road the first weekend of the month. So deserted is the city that parking places have been discovered in the Latin Quarter.Of course a few people, like us, are still working. But we promise not to let that cloud our judgment. We have seen the future in France, and it is vacation--whether we want it or not.The French, who already work 41 fewer days on average than Americans, are about to take more time off. In the high-pressure global economy, this sounds like suicidal sloth. But is the French economy in the dumps? Au contraire: growth is up and unemployment is finally falling. What's going on? Well, maybe the best way to understand this--and it takes some explaining, so please, have a...
  • Seeds Of Carnage

    Imagine a crate full of soft-drink cans, about 200 of them. Imagine the crate is falling from the sky and spills its contents hundreds of feet in the air. The cans sprout little rubbery parachutes. Slowly, they drift toward the ground. As they hit, they start to explode. Some blast out razor-sharp shrapnel. Others are hot enough to bore through metal before they blow up. And some--between 5 and 30 percent--don't detonate at all. They just lie there on the ground, or hang from their parachutes in tree branches, or drift in lakes and seas. Many are bright yellow--very inviting, especially for kids. Until, at some moment impossible to predict, they explode.That's a cluster bomb. The United States dropped more than 1,100 of them on Kosovo this spring: that is, 1,100 "dispensers" containing a total of more than 200,000 "bomblets," as the soda-can-sized explosives are called. The British dropped hundreds more. Others were jettisoned into the Adriatic by Allied pilots who deemed it unsafe...
  • Is It Payback Time For Ethnic Cleansing?

    Slobodan Milosevic wanted an ethnically pure Kosovo. He's now likely to see one--but it will be ethnically Albanian, not Serb. As NATO troops moved into the province last week, local Serbs streamed out. In fact, steady numbers have been leaving throughout the last year. The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) estimates that 300 Serbian villages have been deserted since January; and as many as one third of the province's 200,000 Serbs have fled the fighting, most of them into Serbia. The rest may soon follow. ...
  • A Test Of Survival

    A rowdy pack of young Serbs came parading through downtown Belgrade late last week like vengeful football thugs after a losing game. "Slobo! Pizdo! Kosovo si izd'o!" they chanted. "Slobo, you [wimp]! You sold out Kosovo!" Bystanders nodded and smiled. Outside a fashionable cafe a businessman softly applauded, almost as if greeting the opening bars of a well-remembered song. The words were much the same four years ago--only then it was the loss of Krajina, the Serb enclave in eastern Croatia, that angry Serbs were blaming on Slobodan Milosevic. Back in 1995 more than 200,000 Serbs fled their homes in Krajina when the Croats responded in kind to the plague of ethnic cleansing begun by the Yugoslav president. In the next few weeks Kosovo is likely to produce its own huge wave of Serb refugees. GOTOVO, blared the headlines in Belgrade--FINISHED. ...
  • The Second Time Around

    Mention the name Robert De Niro and people think of "The Godfather," "Raging Bull" and maybe Tribeca Grill. But in 1950s New York, the Robert De Niro that people talked about was neither an actor nor a restaurateur but an artist, one often mentioned in the same breath as Jackson Pollock and Willem de Kooning. He was named one of the most promising painters of his generation. Critics wrote about "the originality and force of his temperament." His bold colors and slashing strokes could draw unex-pected emotions from objects as mundane as a chest of drawers or a chair.De Niro the artist, father of De Niro the actor, died six years ago in relative obscurity at the age of 71. He had been eclipsed by his son. But recently the son came to Paris for the opening of a show of his father's works at the Piltzer gallery on the Avenue Matignon. The appearance was a real tribute, considering that De Niro Jr. vowed less than two years ago never to return to Paris. Back then, a French magistrate...
  • Sightseeing On The Run

    Aldous Huxley once said that for a European, "the greatest charm of travel in the New World is the high ratio of its geography to its history." For an American in Europe, the charm is the reverse. From the spires on the skyline to the paving stones beneath your feet, there are constant reminders that history here runs deep, and dense. Soldiers fought, diplomats genuflected, crusaders gathered, witches burned, peasants marched, poets composed their verses and philosophers their thoughts, and painters waited for the light. And no matter how slowly you stroll, and how diligently you peruse your guide book, there is never enough time to absorb it all. If you're traveling on business, there's almost no time to absorb... anything. In Paris, say, you can go from hotel to conference room to restaurant with nothing to show but a scarf from the airport shop.If you really want to see the city, do it on the run. You might think that's the worst way to experience history. You'd be wrong. The...
  • The Man For The Moment

    During the Bosnian war, Gen. Wesley Clark was among a group of U.S. officials forced to drive a dangerous mountain road outside Sarajevo because the Bosnian Serbs refused to guarantee their safety on a more direct route. Then came tragedy: one of the group's armored personnel carriers slipped off the road and crashed down the mountainside. Clark immediately risked his life to rappel down to the burning APC in a futile attempt to rescue those inside. Three Americans died, and some say Clark still blames the Serbs for the loss.The man called SACEUR--Supreme Allied Commander in Europe--brings a lot of personal history to the war he launched last week. Clark not only knows the rugged terrain of Yugoslavia, he knows the men he's attacking: he even talks to them on the phone. On the first day of fighting, hours before the bombs began to fall, Clark called a man he knows, the chief of the Yugoslav defense staff. Clark warned the general to keep the Yugoslav Navy in port, or else. The Serb...
  • Five-Ring Scandal

    Andre Guelfi loves the olympic business. Or, rather, the business he gets from the Olympics. Known to the press and police of France as Dede the Sardine, the 78-year-old Guelfi is a flamboyant, Moroccan-born French entrepreneur who's played on his friendship with International Olympic Committee president Juan Antonio Samaranch to hustle up deals worth hundreds of millions of dollars. Or so he claims. Guelfi, who earned his fortune as a fishing magnate, says that he helped Moscow fight the Olympic boycott in 1980 and backed Tashkent's brief bid for the Games in the 1990s. Along the way, Guelfi got a cut of more than 40 business deals. He'd have won the 2004 Olympics for St. Petersburg, he boasts, if only he hadn't been thrown in jail by a French judge on allegations related to another scandal.Though wealthy and well-connected, Guelfi is not the kind of friend that Samaranch can use right now. Since December the IOC has been weathering the worst crisis in its history. Last week it...
  • Welcome Back, Great Satan

    Bruce Laingen wants to go back to the scene of his 444-day ordeal as a hostage in Iran. He was the ranking U.S. diplomat in Tehran when radical Islamic students seized the embassy, and mobs chanting "Death to America" gathered outside. The standoff ended in January 1981, leaving a curtain of anger between Iran and America that Laingen and fellow captives now hope to lift. Their return on a journey of reconciliation "would be a great, symbolic way to open up relations," says former hostage and embassy spokesman Barry Rosen.The surprising inspiration for this mission comes from the hostage-takers themselves. Older and mellower now, many of these former firebrands are now key advisers to President Mohammed Khatami, who was elected in 1997 and is now trying to bring Iran out of its isolation. His vice president for the Environment, Massoumeh Ebtakar, was known and generally despised by the American hostages as "Mary," the student translator. Other former radicals now use Tehran's...
  • Giving Voice To Freedom

    HIS FATHER SAID HE WAS JUST going out to buy some groceries for dinner. Mom was away for the evening visiting friends. Sohrab, 13, went back to reading his book as the light faded on the north Tehran high-rise apartment blocks. But now it was dark, and Papa wasn't back. Sohrab called his older brother. He called his mother at her friends' place. And still his papa hadn't come back, and couldn't be found. ...
  • Farewell To The King

    IT WASN'T MUCH OF A KINGDOM, and at first he didn't seem like much of a king. Jordan, it was often said, had been created in the back seat of a cab by Winston Churchill, the British colonial secretary, one Sunday afternoon in 1921. The desolate country had no oil and not enough water, and it would soon have too many people. Hussein bin Talal was not yet 18 when he was given the Jordanian crown. His enemies tried to kill him by strafing his home, shooting at his plane, poisoning his food and putting acid in his nose drops. His friends condescended to him by dubbing him ""the PLK''--the Plucky Little King. But for 46 years his reign survived, until lymphatic cancer finally caught up with him. Late last week the king lay near death in a military hospital in Amman. ...
  • The Night Diana Died

    Blue police lights twirled silently in the post-midnight Place de l'Alma. The sirens had left with the injured Princess of Wales. Paris was quiet. A small crowd of journalists lingered at the end of the tunnel waiting for the crushed Mercedes to be dragged out. I saw a TV producer I first met in Libya, a cameraman I remembered from Baghdad. We all lived in Paris, but we met only in wars--and now here, at the scene of a traffic accident we'd been called out of bed to report. The basic story came into focus quickly. The princess and her friend had been chased by paparazzi. The friend was dead. So was the driver of the car. A bodyguard was badly hurt. But it looked like the princess might be more or less OK. My cell phone rang. Somebody from CNN was calling, then somebody from NBC. And all I could tell them was what I saw as I watched the car brought out of the tunnel. The grill, the hood, the engine was smashed back almost as far as the front seats. It was hard to believe anybody...
  • A New Breed Of Killers

    THEY SANG, THEY DANCED, THEY praised their god--and they slaughtered everyone in sight. When the killing spree was over in Luxor, Egypt, last week, 58 foreign tourists lay dead. Most of the victims were Japanese, Swiss, German and British. Sources told NEWSWEEK that four Americans survived by hiding among Luxor's antiquities. The attackers were Islamic zealots. In an orgy of blood, they hacked off noses and ears and slit one corpse open from neck to navel to shove a propaganda leaflet inside. ""Their eyes looked as if they had taken drugs,'' recalled Rosemarie Dousse, a 66-year-old Swiss tourist who was wounded in the stomach and leg. ""They told us to kneel, and then they started shooting.'' ...
  • The Last Chapter

    AT AROUND 6 O'CLOCK ON THE LAST EVENING OF HIS life, Emad (Dodi) Fayed sent forth a request from the Imperial Suite at his father's hotel, the Paris Ritz. He had checked in with his companion, Diana, Princess of Wales, who was having her hair done. While she was thus distracted, Dodi asked that two rings be sent over from Repossi Jewelers, an exclusive shop just across the Place Vendome. He bought one for $205,400: an emerald-cut diamond, surrounded by four smaller diamonds, set in a gold band. The ring, say Paris jewelers, is popular with wealthy men courting women who have been married before. ""Dis-moi Oui!'' says the advertisement for the ring--""Tell me yes!'' ...