David Ansen

Stories by David Ansen

  • A Werner Herzog Action Movie

    Dieter Dengler (Christian Bale), an American Navy pilot in the Vietnam War, is shot down over Laos, captured, tortured and held in a POW camp in the Laotian jungle, where he immediately begins plotting his escape, though no one has flown the coop before. He is, in many respects, a classic action-movie hero—courageous, clever, indomitable. But "Rescue Dawn" is a Werner Herzog movie (and a true story), and though it's as taut and exciting as many edge-of-your-seat Hollywood escape movies, there's a mania about Dieter that sets him apart, a wild-eyed bravado that suggests the line between bravery and complete lunacy is a thin one. Who better than Bale, who is scarily good at macho obsessiveness, to take on the challenge?Herzog, always at his best working in insufferable jungle conditions ("Aguirre, the Wrath of God," "Fitzcarraldo") is fascinated by stories of extreme will. He's told this one before, in his 1997 documentary "Little Dieter Needs to Fly," and it clearly has its hooks in...
  • Ansen on 'Live Free or Die Harder'

    The last time we saw John McClane (Bruce Willis) he was ... who can remember?  It's been 12 years since "Die Hard with a Vengeance," and while the first "Die Hard" is now properly thought of as an action-movie classic, nobody's been sitting on the edge of their seats waiting for the return of New York's toughest, most put-upon detective.  Would anyone care that he was back?  The good news is, "Live Free or Die Hard" makes you care.  Of all the overproduced sequels promising mindless summer fun, this one actually delivers.I looked up my review of the 1990 "Die Hard 2" and what I wrote then still applies: "The 'Die Hard' movies have many of the same virtues as the James Bond movies: first-rate production values, an endless supply of escalating cliffhangers and a fine sense of their own preposterousness."  "Live Free or Die Harder" may pretend to take place in the real world of terrorist threats, but any movie in which the hero brings down a chopper by catapulting a speeding car into...
  • Talk Transcript: Sean Smith on Angelina Jolie

    Like old-time Hollywood movie stars, Angelina Jolie has always seemed larger than life. Not one to disappear into a role, she makes the character fit her fiercely glamorous persona. "A Mighty Heart" changes all that. Playing Mariane Pearl, the wife of Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl, who was kidnapped and murdered by Islamic militants in Karachi, Pakistan, in 2002, Jolie does a miraculous vanishing act, down to her complex French accent, inflected with the Cuban and Dutch of her parents. Smart, prickly, courageous, her terror often covered over with steely flashes of anger, Pearl—as anyone who saw her on TV after her loss—refused the public role of victim that the touchy-feely American media tried to impose on her. Jolie honors her fortitude with a performance of meticulous honesty. Every flicker of Mariane's conflicting emotions passes like quicksilver over Jolie's face, but nothing is milked for pathos.This is in keeping with the tone of director Michael Winterbottom's...
  • David Ansen Reviews 'Sicko'

    Whatever you think of Michael Moore—and who doesn't have an opinion?—the man has an impeccable sense of timing. His newest polemic, "Sicko," takes aim at our disastrous health-care system at a moment in the national debate when even the die-hardest boosters of free enterprise acknowledge that major changes have to be made, if not the free universal health care that most Western countries offer, and that we resist.The "we," as Moore takes pains to show us, are the drug companies, the hospital industry, the bought-and-paid-for politicians and the health-insurance companies, the latter being the true focus of this alternately hilarious and heartbreaking screed. This time around, Moore spares us the spectacle of himself storming the offices of his villains, his camera ever ready to capture their clench-jawed embarrassment. He's more concerned with the victims—not the 50 million uninsured, but the much vaster numbers who have private health insurance, and suffer for it. We see their...
  • 'Mr. Brooks': Murder in 12 Steps

    If you've seen the trailer for the Kevin-Costner-is-a-killer movie "Mr. Brooks," you might fear that the entire plot has been given away. The good news: there are many twists, turns, subplots and surprises that the coming attractions don't even hint at. The bad news: these twists and turns are so preposterous, or so irrelevant, that they undermine the movie they're meant to tart up.The title character, played by Costner, is a pillar of the Portland, Ore., community, a happily married husband and father who has an unfortunate addiction to murder. He even goes to AA meetings to deal with his problem, though he's understandably reticent about sharing. His only confidant is—himself: Mr. Brooks has a devilish alter ego who goads him on in his life of crime, and this evil id-dude is played, very cannily, by William Hurt. As the bickering sides of Mr. Brooks's twisted psyche, Costner and Hurt have a delicious chemistry, but it doesn't bode well for a movie when the only two compelling...
  • Birth of an Insemination

    What "the 40-year-Old Virgin" suggested, "Knocked Up" confirms. Judd Apatow is making the freshest, most honest mainstream comedies in Hollywood. The writer-director has managed to synthesize the neurotic, outsider comedy of Woody Allen, the benign satire of Paul Mazursky and the gross-out combustibility of the Farrelly Brothers into a sweet, raunchy and loose style all his own.Apatow's favorite subject is the eternally adolescent male, in this case the reefer-smoking, videogame-playing slacker Ben Stone (Seth Rogen), whose inclination is to remain forever in the romper room of overgrown childhood. Reality bites in the form of Alison Scott (Katherine Heigl), an out-of-his-league beauty who takes the frazzled, grateful Ben to bed after too many drinks. The movie's title telegraphs the outcome. Alison wants the baby, and she wants to get to know the father, and thus "Knocked Up" weaves its very contemporary variation on a romantic comedy, in which Ben must face the horror of ......
  • Ansen: 'Pirates' Stinks Then Sinks

    I knew I was in for a long night when Johnny Depp finally makes his appearance in the third—and let us pray final—installment of “Pirates of the Caribbean: At World’s End.” Depp, as Jack Sparrow, is residing in Davy Jones’s locker—i.e., he’s dead—where he is the solitary captain of a landlocked Black Pearl, and subject to hallucinations. In his visions, every crew member looks like Johnny Depp, and in fact is Johnny Depp, but if you think that 10 versions of the scene-stealing star will increase your enjoyment tenfold, think again. Sparrow, I am sorry to say, does not get one explosive laugh in the entire 168 minutes of this loud, cluttered and confusing sequel. More is not merrier.The plot is not only hard to follow, there seems to be nothing real at stake. Half the characters are already dead, and half the movie seems to involve swordfights with dead people who can’t be killed with swords. Orlando Bloom and Keira Knightley expended their chemistry in the first, and best, “Pirates”...
  • shrek-the-third-tease

    No More Mickey Mouse: Animation for Adults

    This Friday "Shrek the Third" will swagger into theaters, its eye on the prize of seizing its predecessor's crown as the most successful animated film in history. A few days later, with far less fanfare, "Paprika," the work of Japanese animé master Satoshi Kon, will also be unveiled. It happens to be one of the most wildly (and disturbingly) inventive animated films I've seen, but will anyone notice? Unlike "Shrek," it's not conceived as fun for the whole family. "Paprika" is made for grown-ups.Great animated movies, of course, obliterate the distinction between adult and kids' movies: think of Pixar's brilliant "Toy Story" movies, Miyazaki's peerless "Spirited Away," the "Wallace and Gromit" shorts or the sassy and ebullient first "Shrek"—all of them marketed to kids, but only adults can savor them on all levels. Yet in this country we think of animation only as child's play. Is it because cartoons colonized our little minds when we were kids, and so will always be consigned to a...
  • Film: A Marriage Torn Apart By Alzheimer's

    The easy and lazy way to describe "Away From Her" is to say that it's a movie about a woman (Julie Christie) with Alzheimer's. There's nothing factually wrong with that sentence, but it conjures up the image of a sentimental disease-of-the-week TV movie. The film that the 28-year-old Canadian actress Sarah Polley has made from Alice Munro's story "The Bear Came Over the Mountain" is emotionally devastating, but its insights into the complexities of love and marriage and memory are not the sort you're likely to find on Lifetime. Its tears are earned in more honest, surprising ways."Away From Her" is the story of a marriage. Grant (Gordon Pinsent), a retired professor, and the vibrant, playful Fiona (Christie) have been together 44 years. They've achieved a remarkable closeness in this late, nearly idyllic phase of their marriage, which is when her memory starts to fail. As her condition worsens, the recent past is the first thing to disappear from her mind, leaving behind older, more...
  • Movies: Ansen on  '28 Weeks'

    The entire population of London was wiped out by the "Rage" virus in "28 Days Later," Danny Boyle's stylishly resonant zombie freak out, but in the slick and frenetically intense "28 Weeks Later," the city is starting to come back. We learn in a series of titles that 11 weeks later, a U.S.-led NATO force entered the city, and that 18 weeks later London was declared virus free. Now reconstruction has begun, and a new imported civilian population is ensconced in a heavily fortified enclave in East London patrolled by jittery and increasingly trigger-happy Yank troops. It's referred to as the Green Zone. Hmmm. Do you smell a political metaphor here?The director's reins have been turned over to the flashy young Spaniard Juan Carlos Fresnadillo ("Intacto"), who may have Iraq in the back of his mind but is primarily interested in scaring the beejesus out of the audience. He's abandoned the grungy video look of the original for Enrique Chediak's gorgeous, more expensive-looking...
  • Ansen: 'Spider-Man 3' Quadruples the Fun

    Superman has always been the star of "Superman," not Clark Kent. Same goes for Batman/Bruce Wayne, only a little less so. What's different about the Spider-Man series is that it's always been more about sensitive, vulnerable Peter Parker than about his superhuman alter ego. Spidey's not a natural-born superhero. It's damn hard work swinging between skyscrapers, and Parker spent a good portion of "Spider-Man 2" wondering if it was worth the trouble. Where was the respect? Where was the glory? He was this close to turning in his spandex suit."Spider-Man 2" was hailed by many as the most grown-up of comic-book action movies, which was ironic in that nerdy Peter is the most adolescent superhero in the Marvel movie galaxy. It was all about his growing pains, his doubts, his insecurities, which all former adolescents could relate to—though to these eyes "Spidey 2" got a little too self-important for its own good: the less prestigious, more slapdash original was actually more fun.Now, in...
  • Movies: Ansen on 'Hot Fuzz'

    “Hot Fuzz,” directed by Edgar Wright, does for the cop action movie what “Shaun of the Dead” did for the zombie flick. It’s a bigger, faster cut-and funnier-movie than its predecessor, but that’s as it should be in a film that’s sending up the overamped conventions of a Jerry Bruckheimer/Joel Silver-style big-budget action movie, transformed into quaint English idioms. The supercop hero, Nick Angel, played by co-writer Simon Pegg, is a grim and zealous London bobbie whose arrest rate is 400 times that of his nearest competitor, which tends to make the other fellows look bad. So, to get him out of the way, he is “promoted” to a faraway job in sleepy, seemingly crime-free Sandford, where his by-the-book approach to the law does not play well with the astonishingly lenient local cops. Before this very clever comedy is over, however, machines guns will be blasting, the death rate will soar, and Nick and his galumphing sidekick, Danny (Nick Frost), will find their lives imitating the hi...
  • Ansen on a Great Thai Filmmaker

    The young Thai director Apichatpong Weerasethakul is not exactly a household name in the U.S. But on film-festival circuits, and wherever cineastes huddle (if you can huddle on the Internet, on sites such as GreenCineDaily) his unpronounceable name is inspiring a devoted following. Apichatpong ("Blissfully Yours," "Tropical Malady") is a true original, with a cinematic voice entirely his own, as anyone fortunate enough to see his hypnotic latest film, "Syndromes and a Century," will discover. I first saw it last fall at the New York Film Festival, and it sent me out into the streets in a state of euphoria I couldn't properly explain. It opens in New York this week, and will be playing in San Francisco, Los Angeles, Chicago and other cities in the coming months. I won't pretend it will be to everybody's taste—it fits into no recognizable genre and doesn't give a fig for "plot" in any conventional sense—but for those seeking a palette cleanser after a steady diet of Hollywood "product...
  • Ansen: 'The Hoax' Is Fun, Smart Film

    James Frey was a piker compared with Clifford Irving: the minor-league fibs of "A Million Little Pieces" are child's play next to the brilliant and almost successful fraud Irving perpetrated in 1971. Claiming to have exclusive interviews with the reclusive, eccentric billionaire Howard Hughes, Irving (who had, tellingly, previously written a book about art forger Elmyr de Hory called "Fake!") received enormous paychecks for writing "The Autobiography of Howard Hughes" with his associate and partner in crime Dick Suskind. In fact, he had never met Hughes, but his elaborate hoax was so convincing it fooled handwriting experts, and people who had known Hughes. And it had ramifications, according to the wonderfully tricky movie "The Hoax," that led all the way to Nixon's White House and Watergate.Director Lasse Hallstrom, working from a deliciously smart screenplay by William Wheeler, takes off from Irving's own account of his audacious scam, published after he had spent several years...
  • Who Knew Air Guitar Could Be Endearing?

    As a subject for a documentary, a bunch of dudes competing in an air guitar contest might be high on your list—as it was on mine—of totally unnecessary cultural events. I had visions of, at best, a few cheap laughs at the expense of some pathetic kids with delusions of rock-star glory. Did we need another condescending carnival of no-talent exhibitionism in the era of "Jackass," Paris Hilton and the early rounds of "American Idol"?Well, "Air Guitar Nation" is not that movie. Alexandra Lipsitz’s fleet (82 minutes) doc is certainly funny, but never at the expense of its subjects, who are a surprisingly self-aware and sophisticated bunch. How can you not appreciate a contestant—the heady New Yorker Dan Crane—who dubs himself Bjorn Turoque? Bjorn enters the East Coast air guitar competition, held in the Pussycat Lounge in New York, in hopes of becoming the first American champ to compete in the world finals in Oulu, Finland, where air guitarmanship is not taken lightly. ("Make air, not...
  • Ansen on Mira Nair's 'The Namesake'

    Mira Nair's sprawling, engrossing saga "The Namesake," like the acclaimed Jhumpa Lahiri novel on which it's based, spans three decades and two generations, traveling from the 1970s to the present, from Calcutta to New York and back again, immersing us in the immigrant lives of the Ganguli family. There is enough material in this story to fill a mini-series. Indeed, there are times when you wish the movie were a mini-series. This is meant both as a tribute, for the Ganguli family is so engaging you'd be happy spending much more time with them, and an acknowledgment that a tale this expansive doesn't always fit comfortably within the constraints of a feature-length frame.Early on, "The Namesake" transports us from a humid, crowded, colorful Calcutta living room—where young Ashoke (Irrfan Khan) meets his bride-to-be, Ashima (Tabu)—to a bare, wintry New York apartment where the couple, who barely know each other, begin their new life in America. The transition is a visceral and visual...
  • Movies: Soccer and Sexism

    In Iran, women are not allowed to attend soccer games. This rule is supposed to protect them from the bad language and crude behavior of men. But many soccer-loving girls try to get around this by disguising themselves as boys and sneaking into the stadium. In "Offside," the acclaimed Iranian director Jafar Pahani—whose powerful film "The Circle" examined the plight of women in a sexist, repressive country—shows us what happens when a group of savvy Tehran girls tries to sneak into the World Cup qualifying match between Iran and Bahrain.This buoyant but barbed comedy, which opens in the U.S. today, uses nonprofessional actors and was shot while the actual soccer match was unfolding. (Like the girls, Pahani had to use subterfuge to make the movie, lying to the authorities about its subject.) These spirited girls aren't overtly political: they just love the sport, and the young soldiers who round them up and guard them in a makeshift pen inside the stadium are equally ardent soccer...
  • Ansen on 'The Wind That Shakes the Barley'

    In one of many wrenching scenes in Ken Loach's powerful film about the Irish rebellion and civil war, "The Wind that Shakes the Barley," a man must execute an informer. The man is Damien (Cillian Murphy), a thoughtful, sensitive young man who had planned to go to London to practice medicine. Not wanting to get involved in politics, he's sucked into the fight against the occupying British when he witnesses, firsthand, the atrocities committed by the English troops—the Black and Tans—against the Irish. Outraged by the injustice, he joins his older brother Teddy (Padriac Delaney) in the guerilla war. The informer he must shoot, Chris (John Crean), is a lad he's known since childhood, and a fellow member of the "flying column" in County Cork that is setting ambushes to kill the British soldiers. Chris has been forced to betray his brothers-in-arms: if he doesn't, his family will be killed. When Damien takes the life of his friend he is crossing a line from which there will be no turning...
  • Ansen: 'Zodiac' Is a Haunting, Riveting Film

    Obsession craves resolution the way a hunter craves his prey. But what happens to the obsessed when there is no resolution? David Fincher's fascinating, uncompromising "Zodiac" is about four men who became obsessed with capturing the legendary Bay Area serial killer known as the Zodiac. The case started in 1968 when two teenagers out on a date were shot in their car in Vallejo, Calif. The girl was killed; the boy survived. The killer, who taunted his pursuers with letters to local newspapers written in code, struck again on the Fourth of July, 1969, when he stabbed a couple picnicking by a lake in Napa County. His third strike came in San Francisco, where he shot a cabdriver in the back of the head and narrowly escaped capture.Anyone who followed the story or who read Robert Graysmith's two best-selling books about the Zodiac knows that almost four decades later, the case has not been solved. That fact alone places Fincher's movie outside convention. Hollywood movies crave...
  • Movies: East Meets West in 'The Namesake'

    Mira Nair's sprawling, engrossing saga, "The Namesake," like the acclaimed Jhumpa Lahiri novel on which it's based, spans three decades and two generations, traveling from the ‘70s to the present, from Calcutta to New York and back again, immersing us in the immigrant lives of the Ganguli family. There is enough material in this story to fill a mini-series. Indeed, there are times when you wish the movie was a mini-series. This is meant both as a tribute, for the Ganguli family is so engaging you'd be happy spending much more time with them, and an acknowledgment that a tale this expansive doesn't always fit comfortably within the constraints of a feature-length frame.Early on, "The Namesake" transports us from a humid, crowded, colorful Calcutta living room—where young Ashoke (Irrfan Khan) meets his bride to be, Ashima (Tabu)—to a bare, wintry New York apartment where the couple, who barely know each other, begin their new life in America. The transition is a visceral and visual...
  • Good Spy Vs. Bad Spy

    Things are not always as they seem. That was certainly the case with Robert Hanssen, the devout, graceless, buttoned-down FBI agent who, after 22 years of deception, was revealed to be one of the most treacherous spies working for the Soviets in U.S. history. It's also the case with "Breach," the movie about Hanssen's capture. The conventional wisdom is that any studio movie released in February is, by definition, a dog. But "Breach" is actually a wonderfully taut cat-and-mouse thriller. It features a performance by Chris Cooper, as the eccentric, contradictory Hanssen, that ought to be remembered as one of the year's best come December. Let's hope that awards voters have longer memories than usual.We know from the get-go that Hanssen's the guilty party: that's not the source of the suspense. The screenplay, written by director Billy Ray and the team of Adam Mazer and William Rotko, tells the story from the point of view of Eric O'Neill (Ryan Phillippe), a young, ambitious FBI agent...
  • A Waking Nightmare

    The Stasi--East Germany's omnipotent and greatly feared secret police--employed some 100,000 people, in addition to the 200,000 informers who could be counted on to spy on their neighbors, their friends and their own families. The waking nightmare of this "socialist paradise," a country with the second highest suicide rate in the world, is unforgettably captured in "The Lives of Others," a German political thriller that has racked up more international awards than Helen Mirren, and this month may well win an Oscar as best foreign-language film.Writer-director Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck sets his tale of betrayal, corruption and moral awakening in East Berlin in 1984, five years before the fall of the wall. The system may be rotting from within, but Capt. Gerd Wiesler (Ulrich Mühe), one of the Stasi's most skilled officers, is still a true believer, rooting out the enemies of East German socialism with a ruthless precision born of genuine ideological commitment.The humorless,...
  • Following The Flock

    Director Robert De Niro and screenwriter Eric Roth's "The Good Shepherd" is nothing if not ambitious. In two hours and 40 minutes of grave, shadowy images, it attempts to tell the story of the formation and transformation of the CIA. It begins with the agency's failed Bay of Pigs invasion in 1961, loops back to the late 1930s, when the Office of Strategic Services (the CIA's predecessor) was created, and then takes us on a globe-hopping trip through the cold war.All this is filtered through the fictional story of Edward Wilson (Matt Damon), a young Yale student plucked from the secret Skull and Bones society in 1939 to serve his country by spying on a suspected Nazi-sympathizing professor (Michael Gambon). The bright, well-bred Wilson is an idealist, but even as a young man there's something shut off about him: he says little, hides his emotions and is strangely passive in the presence of women, even one as seductive as Clover (Angelina Jolie), whom he dutifully marries when she...
  • Humanizing The Enemy

    Clint Eastwood tells the story of the Battle of Iwo Jima from the Japanese side in "Letters From Iwo Jima." You can view it as a bookend to his recent "Flags of Our Fathers," or on its own. Either way, it's unprecedented, a sorrowful and savagely beautiful elegy that can stand in the company of the greatest antiwar movies.Written in English, which was then translated into Japanese by the young Japanese-American Iris Yamashita (who shares story credit with Paul Haggis), the screenplay brings to life four indelible characters, all of whom know there is little chance they'll leave the island alive. General Kuribayashi (Ken Watanabe) is the untraditional officer in charge, who devised the 18 miles of tunnels that enabled the Japanese to withstand the American invasion for almost 40 days. He fights with the irony that, having spent time in the United States before the war, he reveres Americans. Saigo (Kazunari Ninomiya) is an irreverent young baker who just wants to stay alive to see his...
  • Tales Out Of School

    The aptly named Barbara Covett, a stern and lonely teacher at a shabby London secondary school, is a master of both deception and self-deception, which makes her a very dangerous and pathetic woman. Played with acid-tongued relish by Judi Dench in a radical departure from her roles as royalty, she's a deliciously nasty piece of work.Barbara, whose closest companion is her cat, has fallen in love, though she would never put it that way. The focus of her obsession is Sheba Hart (Cate Blanchett), the new art teacher. Attractive, young, happily married with two children and a "bourgeois bohemian" sense of privilege, Sheba is everything Barbara isn't.Imagine her shock when she discovers Sheba in the arms of 15-year-old student Steven (Andrew Simpson). But Barbara quickly gets over her horror when she realizes the glorious opportunity this presents. Now their fates will be forever interlocked. It will be our little secret, she tells the shaken Sheba, as long as you give up the affair....
  • A Brief History Of Sundance Outrages

    Sundance wouldn't be Sundance if someone wasn't getting all hot and bothered about some outrageous, shocking, weird, utterly out-there movie leaping off the screen at the film festival in Park City, Utah. Among the movies getting tongues wagging this year are "Zoo," Robinson Devor's documentary about bestiality, inspired by the true story of a Seattle man who died after having sex with an Arabian stallion; the lurid Southern melodrama "Black Snake Moan," with Christina Ricci as a scantily clad white-trash nymphomaniac who gets chained to a radiator (for her own good, mind you) by Samuel L. Jackson; and another Southern Gothic tale, "Hounddog," which elicited angry protests (even though none of the protestors had seen the movie) because of a scene in which a 12-year-old girl, played by Dakota Fanning, is raped.It was ever thus. Here's a brief timeline of some of the supposedly and actually shocking movies that debuted at Sundance. A few went on to make scandalous waves in the real...
  • Bold-Faced Names

    The level of acting in movies today is as high as it's ever been; the hard part about coming up with a "best" list is knowing where to stop. Even in terrible movies, the acting rarely sinks to the level of the writing and directing. These are the performances that made the most indelible impression in 2006.ACTORRyan Gosling, "Half Nelson"Peter O'Toole, "Venus"Forest Whitaker, "The Last King of Scotland"Ray Winstone, "The Proposition"Toby Jones, "Infamous"Leonardo DiCaprio, "Blood Diamond," "The Departed"Sacha Baron Cohen, "Borat"Melvil Poupaud, "Time to Leave"Patrick Wilson, "Little Children"Christian Bale, "The Prestige"Matt Dillon, "Factotum"Daniel Craig, "Casino Royale"Will Smith, "The Pursuit of Happyness"Derek Luke, "Catch a Fire"Greg Kinnear, "Little Miss Sunshine"James McAvoy, "The Last King of Scotland"Ken Watanabe, "Letters from Iwo Jima"ACTRESSHelen Mirren, "The Queen"Annette Bening, "Running with Scissors"Meryl Streep, "The Devil Wears Prada"Judi Dench, "Notes on a...
  • Holiday Movie Guide

    It will be hard to think of diamonds as a girl's best friend after seeing "Blood Diamond," Ed Zwick's slick, hard-hitting political thriller. The movie pitches us into the midst of a barbaric civil war in Sierra Leone in 1999, in which the profits from illegal, or "conflict," diamonds, sold on the black market to reputable European companies (a tiny splinter of the diamond trade), are used to fund arms on both sides of the war.A rare pink diamond, coveted by all, is the "MacGuffin" that sets the plot in motion. It's found, and secretly buried, by Solomon Vandy (Djimon Hounsou), a Men-de fisherman rounded up by marauding rebel forces and forced to work in their mines. They have also kidnapped his 14-year-old son to join their legions of brainwashed, doped-up child soldiers, and Solomon is counting on the money his diamond will bring to save his boy. The gem is equally coveted by diamond smuggler Danny Archer (Leonardo DiCaprio), a tough, amoral ex-mercenary from Zimbabwe, for whom...
  • Cinematic Fantastic

    This year may be remembered as one that blurred the lines between reality and fiction. "Borat" wasn't just the funniest movie of the year, but the most controversial, fudging the divide between comedy, documentary and faux-documentary. "United 93" and "World Trade Center" came face to face with 9/11; Paul Greengrass’s “United 93” was shot in a cinema verite style that tried to distance it from Hollywood convention. The meatiest roles were often real people: Queen Elizabeth coping with the death of Diana; Idi Amin plunging Uganda into horror; the very real American and Japanese victims of the Battle of Iwo Jima saluted in two Clint Eastwood films; Truman Capote redux. Even the year's best musical, "Dreamgirls," was built on echoes of the true story of Diana Ross and the Supremes. Reality, it turned out, was stranger—and often more potent—than fiction.Army of Shadows Yes, it was made in 1969, but the late Jean-Pierre Melville's fatalistic masterpiece about the French Resistance,...