• The Divorce Generation Grows Up

    Grant High School's class of '82 were raised on 'The Brady Bunch'—while their own families were falling apart. These are their stories—in their words.
  • How AIDS Changed America

    The plague years: It brought out the worst in us at first, but ultimately it brought out the best, and transformed the nation. The story of a disease that left an indelible mark on our history, our culture and our souls.
  • NEWSMAKERS

    Q&A: Cate BlanchettShe arrived with "Elizabeth," and now Cate Blanchett is tackling Katharine Hepburn in Martin Scorsese's "The Aviator." The Oscar nominee spoke with a fellow Aussie, NEWSWEEK's Nicki Gostin.How fabulous a time did you have wearing Hepburn's wardrobe? All those slacks!I felt completely at home in her persona--in trousers, sweaters and trench coats. Whenever Marty had me in a dress, I felt so out of place.Does it bug you when people say you are impersonating Hepburn rather than portraying her?I'll be disappointed if people think it's an impersonation. I suppose that's the assumption because you're playing someone iconic.There's a moment in the film when Howard Hughes accuses Hepburn of always acting. Can you relate?I think very few people are interested in the craft of acting, which is actually to demask, to reveal what it is to be human. It's also just a cliche that actors are like that in real life. I'm not. I don't project when I go buy milk.Can you project...
  • NEWSMAKERS

    Q&A: Jennifer CoolidgeJennifer Coolidge has made a scene-stealing career playing the coquette in "Best in Show" and the hot mom in "American Pie." She turns up in the Hilary Duff movie "A Cinderella Story." She spoke to NEWSWEEK's Nicki Gostin.You play a mean floozy in "A Cinderella Story."Yeah, sort of a mean, gold-digging, extremely self-centered plastic-surgery fanatic.Is the floozy character based on anyone?I used to baby-sit in Beverly Hills for these surgically sculptured women. They wanted me to come to the back door, and drink different water than the family.Because of "American Pie," is it weird to be the idol of teenage boys?[Laughs] A month ago I was walking through a very remote part of British Columbia, and kids were getting out of school and they went nuts.Do younger guys ask you out? ...
  • HEY, MICKEY: BUZZ OFF!

    A key element in a pixar film is the sometimes contentious but ultimately triumphant bond between two great friends. Buzz and Woody. Sulley and Mike. Marlin and Dory. The same cannot be said of Steve and Michael. The relationship between Pixar CEO Steve Jobs and Disney head Michael Eisner began beautifully, with a 1991 deal that, after the groundbreaking success of "Toy Story," morphed into a five-picture arrangement in which Disney became a 50-50 partner with the upstart northern California studio. As Pixar's computer-graphic (CG) films busted blocks, Disney's traditional animated flicks flopped, and tensions grew between the two headstrong execs. But as time came for renegotiations, most of Hollywood assumed a "Casablanca"-style arm-in-arm fadeout. Why break up a good thing?So it came as a shock last Thursday when Jobs told Disney Studios chairman Dick Cook that the talks were over. "After 10 months of trying to strike a deal with Disney, we're moving on," Jobs said in a statement...
  • Good As Gold

    Every year, as Oscar season comes to a boil, NEWSWEEK invites leading contenders in some category or other to sit around a table and see if they hate each other. They never do. (OK, to be honest, one year we invited producers, and some of them actually did seem to hate each other.) For our sixth round table, we invited supporting actors and actresses whose performances floored us in 2002: Catherine Zeta-Jones, Christopher Walken, John C. Reilly, Kathy Bates, Dennis Quaid and Chris Cooper. What followed was a warm, funny--and occasionally off-color--conversation about the acting life. Our guess is that two of these folks will pick up Oscars come March. At the expense of sounding, you know, actor-y, all of them earned one. Excerpts from the discussion:The Broadcast Critics' ChoiceAwards were last night. The Golden Globes are tomorrow night. The Oscars are coming. Does this time of year just feel like a blur?Dennis Quaid: It feels like a ride. I've never been nominated before, but as...
  • Newsmakers

    There were months of fulminations about how Winona Ryder was the victim of a celebrity witch hunt--most of it from her lawyer, Mark Geragos. There were days of intense scrutiny of the cool Marc Jacobs outfits she wore to court. But there were just six hours of deliberation last week on charges stemming from her alleged shoplifting of $5,500 worth of clothes from Saks in Beverly Hills last December. Ryder was found guilty on felony counts of grand theft and vandalism--despite the eyebrow-raising presence on the jury of former Sony chief Peter Guber, who presided over three of Ryder's most-acclaimed movies. (She was acquitted on a third count of commercial burglary.) "Geragos had a difficult case to defend," says juror Walter Fox, "because the evidence was so glaring."Ryder will be sentenced on Dec. 6, with the prosecutor pressing not for jail time, but probation, community service and restitution. The judge alone will make the call, but he'll no doubt be influenced by a report from...
  • The Surging Price Of Power

    Forget "Gladiator." in Hollywood last week, the smart money was riding on The Long Hot Summer. As the threat of blackouts once again became reality, stylists who'd gathered at the swanky L'Ermitage Hotel in Beverly Hills to primp celebrities for Sunday's festivities were suddenly faced with the unthinkable: what if we have to make up Catherine Zeta-Jones in the dark? "You have to have a hair strategy," said publicist Ted Kruckel, whose recommended contingency look was an "all towel-dry, very matte, very flat look, with a little conditioner at the ends. Best of all, you don't need a blow-dryer." ...
  • Searching The Depths

    Heads bowed, they lined up before the cameras, putting faces on a trans-Pacific tragedy. One grief-stricken man, whose 17-year-old son, Yusuke Terata, was among the nine missing aboard the sunken training vessel Ehime Maru, told a news conference at the University of Hawaii last Friday: "My son wanted world peace. Why did he have to die because of this nuclear sub?" Speaking in Japanese, the father angrily addressed Cmdr. Scott Waddle, the captain of the USS Greeneville. Waddle "should get on his knees and bow his head to the floor as a way of apology," he said.The U.S. Navy continues to be the focus of Japanese outrage over the sub accident, which occurred Feb. 9 near Oahu, Hawaii, when the Greeneville surfaced directly underneath the Ehime Maru, ripping it apart. But ultimately, the most senior official to take the fall may be the prime minister of Japan, Yoshiro Mori. He was savaged by the Japanese press last week for his response to the accident. Informed of it while golfing at...