Devin Gordon

Stories by Devin Gordon

  • Newsmakers

    Once Upon a Time in Park CityOne of the best films at this year's Sundance Festival is about a dwarf who digs trains, and stars Peter Dinklage, whom you've never heard of. One of the worst stars Macaulay Culkin. That's Sundance. On the one hand, there's the festival Robert Redford intended: 10 days of indie films with you-couldn't-drag-me-to-it premises, some of which turn out to be good. But then there's the Sundance that Hollywood stars use to hone--or manufacture--their edge. This year, A-listers like Al Pacino and Salma Hayek turned Main Street of Park City, Utah, into a red carpet. They dressed down in designer parkas, but their parties were VIP-only. One fan even tried scaling a wall to get into a Fox Searchlight bash.But the films made the nonsense worthwhile. Almost. The dwarf movie ("The Station Agent") snagged a $1.5 million deal from Miramax. Other winners: the wickedly funny "Pieces of April," about a dysfunctional family's Thanksgiving; "American Splendor," a biopic...
  • Say Goodbye To Hollywood

    Call me a geek, but within a day of arriving in town for the Sundance Film Festival, I found the perfect formula for enjoying myself: skip the parties, stick to the movies.This year's festival, which ends this Sunday in Park City, Utah, was my first, and I quickly learned that there are actually two Sundances. There is the Sundance scene, which turns Park City's sloped, charming Main Street into a giant red carpet--not unlike the gala arrival area at the Oscars, only instead of Gaultier gowns and Armani suits, the celebrities slum it in the finest parkas and snow boots that money can buy.It's all part of the faux egalitarianism of the place. Not only do the big-name attendees (this year's crew included Alec Baldwin, Salma Hayek, Al Pacino, Kevin Spacey and Katie Holmes) dress like "normal people," they come to town on behalf of tiny movies with no budgets, like regular actors. But don't think you'll be getting into their parties.Then there's the other Sundance, the one that festival...
  • Music: Money For Nothing

    Did you purchase a CD at any point between Jan. 1, 1995, and Dec. 22, 2000? If the answer is yes--and it really should be--congratulations! You are entitled to up to $20, absolutely free. (If the answer is no, listen, you need to let go of the eight-tracks. Now.) Just by being a normal consumer, you were unwittingly one of millions of plaintiffs in a class-action lawsuit against the five major record companies and a handful of national retail chains which were on trial for illegally fixing the prices of compact discs. And guess what? You won! Actually, the lawsuit, brought by 41 state attorneys general, was settled out of court by the defendants last September to avoid a lengthy battle. The terms: they will pay $143 million in punitive damages. This is where you come in. Anyone who meets a three-part criteria--which essentially boils down to the question up top--is entitled to a chunk of the loot. Anyone. Even dead people. No joke. You can file on their behalf. (Visit...
  • The Matrix Makers

    One Year, Two Sequels--And A Revolution In Moviemaking. An Exclusive Look Behind The Scenes Of 2003'S Hottest Flicks.
  • I Love My Car

    Oh, the things a "tuner" would love to do to your car... They know what you think of that Honda Civic in your driveway. Safe. Practical. Fuel-efficient. "This car," you think, "was a smart purchase." Here's what tuners dream about when they see your little Civic. First, they'd rip out those boring, no-color seats and put in some contoured racing buckets. They'd tear off the front and rear bumpers and replace them with a body kit--a much more intricately styled trimming designed to get it as low-looking to the ground as possible. The doors would look smooth because of the missing door handles--yup, they shaved them off. And how about some neon? No, lots of neon. Neon trim on the seats. Neon runners on the undercarriage. Neon rings on the exhaust pipes. You bought that Civic used for, what, $6,000? Give a tuner two years and he'll spend three times that turning your economy car into the ultimate street machine.Five years ago the tuner circuit was just an urban subculture, a clique of...
  • Confessions Of An Outrageous Mind

    Screenwriter Charlie Kaufman refuses to sit for photographs, and of course interviewers ask him why. When NEWSWEEK put the question to him at lunch last month, he started out by grumbling that his explanation--which he thinks is pretty reasonable--never gets into the story, forcing readers to conclude that he's either weird or disfigured. (He's neither.) So here you go, Charlie, the floor is yours. "The big thing is, I'm just not a public person. I'm a writer. I'm shy. I don't want to see my face plastered anywhere." Kaufman never imagined this would be an issue, even after "Being John Malkovich" got an Oscar nomination in 2000 for best screenplay. In Hollywood, who cares what the screenwriter looks like? And Kaufman never thought journalists would be writing about him. Now that they have, he wishes they hadn't. "People want to paint me in a very specific way," he says. "A nebbish. Socially awkward. That seems to be the thing. You go, 'OK, I get this guy, he's the nerd who made good...
  • Don't Whack 'The Sopranos' Just Yet

    If you're wondering what went wrong-well, a little bit wrong-with "The Sopranos" this season, the best place to start is actually last season and with a character whom fans of the show have come to call "the Russian."The Russian was a key player in the third season's best episode, "The Pine Barrens," in which Christopher (Michael Imperioli) and Paulie (Tony Sirico) allow a murderous Russian mafioso, whom they tried and failed to kill, to escape into the icy back woods of South Jersey. Chris and Paulie spend the episode tramping through snow and freezing their butts off, trying in vain to find the Russian. They succeed only in getting themselves lost. The Russian hasn't been heard from since. Among fans, he has loomed like a bogeyman--but he shouldn't. He's gone. He's not coming back.One of the many marvelous things about "The Sopranos" is the way mistakes don't always come back to haunt its characters--kind of like real life. Sometimes, we just we get away with things. Sometimes,...
  • Britain's Cat In The Hat

    Damon Gough, a.k.a. Badly Drawn Boy, is going to get this song right if it kills him. He's started and stopped three times so far, and he'll start and stop 12 more if that's what it takes. So what if there are 1,000 people watching him? There's a screeching buzz in his ear--sound problems, apparently--and it's not going away. "I'm sorry," he tells the crowd at Manhattan's Roseland Ballroom, "but this is the most important song off the new record." It is mid-October and Gough's third CD, "Have You Fed the Fish?" doesn't come out for a month. His fans are hearing the new material for the first time, so the sound problems are driving Gough to the brink of a snit. "I promise you," says the squat, shaggy 32-year-old in a blue knit cap, "this is one of the top five songs ever written"--pause--"by Badly Drawn Boy."On take No. 5, Gough finally nails it, and it's worth the wait. "You Were Right," a galloping, bittersweet confessional, really is one of the top five songs ever written by Badly...
  • Winner By A Mile

    All the people who've ever met Brittany Murphy most likely have one thing in common: they have all been hugged by Brittany Murphy. Over the course of an hour-and-a-half conversation in the lobby of Manhattan's Mercer Hotel, she issues 11 hugs, an average of one every eight minutes. The recipients, in chronological order, include: (1) a Hollywood talent agent; (4) Curtis Hanson, who directed Murphy's new film "8 Mile" and was having lunch next door; (6) actress Naomi Watts ("The Ring"), who's staying at the hotel; (7) Aussie heartthrob Heath Ledger, who's staying with Naomi; (9) a hotel employee, and (10) the author of this piece--twice. Ordinarily, being 10th in line might make a person feel kind of cheap. But Murphy is an uncommonly good hugger. She does full wingspan, plus a light, chummy squeeze. None of that awkward, one-armed crap. You may be No. 10, but you'll feel like four.On the big screen, Murphy, who turns 25 next week, has built a career on similar feats of alchemy....
  • 'Jackass' Nation

    I first met Johnny Knoxville two years ago, about a month before "Jackass"--the hilariously masochistic show that would make him both famous and infamous--premiered on MTV. It was clear to me from the moment we sat down that Knoxville was going to be a huge star. He wasn't macho or self-serious like most daredevils. He was a sweet-natured goofball.The stunt that got Knoxville the MTV gig featured him strapping on a Kevlar vest and shooting himself in the torso with a pistol. (Ironically, it never aired on the network. Even Knoxville thought it unwise.) During my interview, I asked him about the experience. So did it hurt? "Not really. The vest actually displaced the impact really well," he said. "It was like someone hitting you in the chest with a shovel as hard they can." Uh, wouldn't that hurt? Knoxville paused. "Hmm. Good point."The other noteworthy thing I remember about Knoxville is how unfailingly polite he was. Four years into my NEWSWEEK career, he is still the only profile...
  • Mere Words Can't Describe Sigur Ros

    In the annals of pretentious album titles, the latest CD by the critically revered Icelandic band Sigur Ros sets a new--and perhaps insurmountable--benchmark. Until now the champ was probably Fiona Apple, whose second CD had as its title a 90-word allegorical poem about chess or something. But at least she used actual words. Sigur Ros is a high-minded, genre-busting group, known for eight-minute songs that build to ecstatic climaxes, but that's no excuse for naming their album this: "( )." Yup, those are parentheses. So what does it mean? Who knows? Maybe it's a joke, a really funny Icelandic knee-slapper that just doesn't translate, but I doubt it. The four men of Sigur Ros (which means "Victory Rose") have never been the funny-ha-ha type. After all, the new album--which, parentheses be damned, I'm calling "The New Album"--has eight songs, and all of them are untitled. No, these guys are serious.This sort of nonsense might fly in Reykjavik, but it's forgivable here only if the...
  • Ultrahigh Resolution

    Ever notice how videos on MTV these days kinda stink? Good ones are still getting made--just not here. Europe is where it's at right now. Case in point: the British trio Dirty Vegas's "Days Go By," in which a man drops a boombox on a nameless city street and begins b-boying like he just stepped out of "Breakin' 2: Electric Boogaloo." MTV eventually caught on, but the video wasn't seen in America until it premiered last year at RESFEST, a four-day traveling carnival of the world's most inventive short films. The top draw at RESFEST, which hits New York on Oct. 16 and visits Los Angeles starting Oct. 30, is "Cinema Electronica," a two-hour parade of the year's coolest new music videos. The 2002 roster will feature a Chemical Brothers clip by director Michel Gondry (who did an MTV-award winner for the White Stripes) and a DJ Shadow clip by Hong Kong auteur Wong Karwai ("In the Mood for Love"). But according to RESFEST director Jonathan Wells, this year's "Days Go By" will be FC Kahuna...
  • Newsmakers

    'Les Miz' Bows OutThey're ripping down the barricades at "Les Miserables," and even Broadway insiders are shocked. After all, "Les Miz" was the sturdiest of Broadway hits, a show that not only managed to make the French Revolution entertaining but over the years employed the likes of Debbie Gibson and Ricky Martin. Producer Cameron Mackintosh, who announced that the musical is throwing in its red flag for good on March 15, 2003, says "Les Miz" was especially hurt by slower ticket sales after September 11. But the fact is those dour British megamusicals aren't as much fun in the era of feel-good Hollywood-inspired shows like "Hairspray," "Thoroughly Modern Millie" and "The Producers." With the death of "Les Miz"--after 16 years, second to "Cats" in Broadway longevity--only "Phantom of the Opera" is still standing. "The British invasion was probably overemphasized when it was happening, and its demise will be as well," says Jed Bernstein, president of the American League of Theatres...
  • A Spanking Good Role

    So James Spader is starring in a weird, kinky sex movie? You don't say. What a stretch. The 42-year-old actor has made a career out of carnal deviance, most famously in 1989's "sex, lies and videotape" and most notoriously in the 1996 cars-and-copulation fantasy "Crash." In "Secretary" (review) the fetish du jour is S&M, but the office romance in question is so unexpectedly sweet it feels unlike anything Spader has done before. "The two of them seemed so innocent to me," says the actor. "[Grey] is really struggling away at life to no avail. And I just liked seeing someone taken so by surprise by love."Like the movie, Spader himself defies expectation. On screen, he's usually playing Yuppie scum. In life, he's more like a soccer dad. Spader is intensely private and so far out of the Hollywood loop he lives in Massachusetts. It has been years since his name was on everyone's--or anyone's--lips, partly because he's landed himself in some terrible movies like the sci-fi dud ...
  • Playing By Her Own Rules

    When you think about it, three years is a really, really long time to go without sex. "The West Wing," NBC's romance-starved White House saga, has won three straight Emmys for best drama series, so it seems to be managing just fine. But enough is enough. And Mary-Louise Parker, who joined the show late last season as lobbyist Amy Gardner and was so electric she earned an Emmy nomination for only six episodes of work, believes she's just the woman to end the dry spell. "I want a seven-minute sex scene," Parker says with a troublemaker's glint. "Just imagine it: me and Brad"--that would be Bradley Whitford, who plays love interest Josh Lyman--"and the whole time we're talking in really fast, really perfect paragraphs." Early this season, the two characters cross paths at a fund-raiser at the House of Blues. "I didn't know what to wear," she recalls, "and the producers said, 'Maybe a tank top, but we don't want you to look too sexy.' And I was like, 'Look, I am happy to wear the tank...
  • Campaign '02: Puffy's Got His Back

    Hip-hop stars are famous for endorsing Escalades, Courvoisier and, most commonly, themselves. Political candidates tend not to make it onto their radar screens. Until now, that is. Rap mogul Sean (P. Diddy) Combs told NEWSWEEK that he will formally endorse Carl McCall, the Democratic candidate in New York's heated gubernatorial race, later this week. Combs isn't the first hip-hop figure to attempt to extend his influence into politics--Def Jam Records founder Russell Simmons, who also founded the policy-inclined Hip Hop Summit Action Network, was a strong supporter of Hillary Clinton's 2000 Senate campaign and also endorsed McCall last week--but the rapper is the industry's first major artist to throw his weight behind a candidate. "I ain't about to be a politician or nothing like that," says Combs. "But at the same time, I do vote, I do have kids and I do have my duty as a citizen to be politically conscious." (The McCall campaign was "pleased" to learn of P. Diddy's support, a...
  • High 'Wire' Act

    If HBO's cops-and-drug-dealers series "The Wire," which wrapped its first season on Sept. 8, were instead debuting on, say, ABC or CBS this week, I'd give it two episodes before it was canceled.The show's pilot--which ran back on June 2--was, quite frankly, a snooze. Nothing happened. The first of two protagonists, Baltimore homicide Det. Jimmy McNulty (played by English actor Dominic West) was--stop me if you've heard this before--a brooding, divorced, loose cannon with no respect for authority. His superior was a company-man jerk. His partner was a fat black man.The pilot's only innovation was that it simultaneously introduced members of a powerful black street gang. The protagonist here was D'Angelo Barksdale, cousin of gang leader Avon Barksdale. D'Angelo, played by a stunning young actor named Larry Gilliard Jr., had just beaten a murder rap. Obviously, McNulty and Barksdale's worlds would soon collide; "The Wire's" gimmick was that it would trail both spheres in epic detail. I...
  • Coach Till You Drop

    The last time Herman Edwards, head coach of the New York Jets, wrote a personal check was 1997. He thinks. "Let's see," Edwards says, glancing up at the ceiling of his terrifyingly tidy office in the Jets' Hempstead, N.Y., training facility. "Yeah, probably five years ago. I don't even have a checkbook." Or, at the moment, any real cash. He grabs a leather satchel from the floor and pulls out a small fistful of crumpled bills. "Seven dollars," he says with a huge smile. "That's all I got." Edwards, of course, is a long way from poor: the 48-year-old coach made $850,000 last year, his first with the Jets. He simply doesn't have the time to be trusted with money matters, so his wife, Leah, takes care of everything. In the Edwards household, Leah doesn't just wear the pants--she picks them out and buys them, too. It has to work that way. The coach's days begin at 4:30 a.m. and stretch past midnight. He will not have a day off--not a single one--until Thanksgiving. Better be one heck of...
  • Gidget Girls

    There were a few guys in the water at Malibu that Vicki Flaxman just wouldn't mess with, even if they did cut her off in the lineup or snake her on a wave. Like Buzzy Trent, who played football--he was just too big. If he wanted the next wave, well, he could have it. But Vicki was nearly as big as everybody else--she weighed 156 pounds, solid muscle from head to toe--and tougher than all of them. When they gave her trouble, she'd give it right back. "If one of those boys took off in front of me, I'd get so mad, I'd chase 'em down and drag 'em off their boards," says Flaxman, now Vicki Williams and 70 years old. "Then I'd growl at 'em. I'd say, 'Don't you ever take off in front of me again!' "Vicki, in case you couldn't guess, was the competitive one. Early in that summer of 1950, someone in the Malibu crowd (a guy, naturally) made the mistake of predicting that Claire Cassidy, Vicki's pal from UCLA, would be the best girl surfer by the end of the season. Vicki was furious. "Uh-uh,"...
  • Don't Try Playing Through

    Tiger Woods is a chump. Yeah, that's right. When he won the U.S. Open in June on the Black Course at Bethpage, he had it easy--just strolled right up to the first tee. He didn't drive cross-country to play. He didn't sleep in the parking lot for two nights. And he sure as heck didn't pay the $39 greens fee. If you want to play Bethpage Black, you, mere mortal, will have to do all those things. In the weeks since Woods played through, "The Black," the first truly public course ever to host the Open, has been a zoo. Golf nuts are driving from as far as Montana and waiting in their cars 48 hours for a tee time. "I just had a woman call from Canada asking what her chances were of playing tomorrow," says Joe Rehor, golf director at Bethpage. "I told her, 'Drive slowly, and when you get here, keep on going'." Many out-of-towners also don't realize what they're getting into. They can't handle the 7,214-yard monster and, sin of all sins, they slow down play. "Nothing we can do about it,"...
  • Blood, Sweat &Amp; Pastry

    There is no pastry-chef equivalent of seppuku, the ritualistic method of suicide for shamed samurai, but if there were, Jean-Philippe Maury looks about ready to commit it. For 13 hours over the last two days he has guided the United States' three-man World Team Pastry Championship squad through the warp-speed production of a full table of desserts: bonbons, petits fours, a pair of cakes and two towering showpieces, one made entirely of sugar, the other chocolate. Everything went great. They cooked butt.Then head judge Jacques Torres, the Food Network star and former pastry chef at Le Cirque, pulled the U.S. captain aside to break the news: Maury had made a mistake. While airbrushing his chocolate showpiece he applied a strip of clear, protective plastic to the back--and forgot to remove it. A tiny error, but enough to open the door for the French, the Belgians or even the upstart Japanese. For months, Maury, 33, had been assuring everyone of victory, but now doubt was creeping in. ...
  • The Return Of Dave

    I could tell that the Dave Matthews Band had returned to its former glory after listening to its new CD, "Busted Stuff," just one time: I didn't like a single song. Every track, 11 altogether, sounded like a mess. I was ecstatic.See, I've been a DMB devotee-apologetically at times, I admit-since 1994, when the five-man crew was a tiny jam band worshipped on kinda-Southern college campuses like the University of Virginia, the University of North Carolina and, my former home, Duke. And with each new DMB album, a ritual began to take shape. The first time through, the band's sprawling compositions, bursting arrangements and wacky time signatures would absolutely confound me. I couldn't pick out the melodies. As soon as I began to guess where a song was going, the band would shift gears-drop a tune like an interrupted thought and pick up another, seemingly unrelated. By the time the final note sounded, I'd find I couldn't hum more than a few seconds of the 60 minutes of music I'd heard....
  • Design: Let's Do The Time Warp

    TV sets are an easy thing to evaluate. The better the picture, the better the TV--simple. That's why those plasma-screen thingies are considered the very best. Turn one on, and you can see the dimples on Tiger's golf balls and the tiny flames that shoot out of his nostrils. By this standard, Telstar Electronics' retro-classic Predicta TV sets are... perfectly fine. The real reason to buy a Predicta requires a shift in standards: no TV on the planet looks better once you turn it off.Telstar, a seven-person Wisconsin shop, began with the idea that your TV doesn't have to. Back in the 1950s, original Predicta models like Danish Modern and Princess brought taste and warmth, along with Jackie Gleason, into the living room. Telstar builds new Predictas from scratch, tailoring each client's set so that the finished TV blends seamlessly into its new home. The waiting list has stretched to six months. "I've had businessmen call and say, 'Here's how you mass-produce these things.' Well, that...
  • Dvds: You Say 'Autobot,' I Say 'Decepticon'

    For boys of a certain age, the last time we'll admit to crying at a movie was 1986, when Optimus Prime died at the hands of the Decepticons in "Transformers: The Movie." Well, grab your hankies again, boys, only this time prepare to shed tears of joy. Rhino Records, peddler of eternally cool pop-culture relics, has just released a DVD box set of season one of "The Transformers," the revered mid-1980s afternoon cartoon about a race of vehicles and weapons that morph into giant robots. (Optimus Prime, you'll recall, was the pure-hearted 18-wheeler chief of the Autobots, forever dueling with the evil Megatron and his minister-of-information sidekick Soundwave for control of... whoa, sorry.) Rhino reports that sales of the box set have already exceeded the company's one-year expectations, thanks to massive preordering. And that means more good news for fans: season two is on its way. After that, Rhino, we want "Voltron." And "The Go-Bots." And "G.I. Joe."
  • Bye-Bye, 'American Pie'

    Chris and Paul Weitz want you to know that they loved directing "American Pie." They're proud of the final result, proud that it became a teen-comedy classic. But there are downsides to making a movie in which a horny teenager humps a baking product. See, scenes like that tend to follow you around. You become the pie guys. And then something decidedly non-pie comes along--something like Nick Hornby's "About a Boy," a smart, witty best seller about a selfish London bachelor who befriends an oddball kid--and you've got to spend two years begging people to let you make it. Because Hornby and Hugh Grant, the star of the movie, do not want the pie guys. "I think Nick actively disliked the movie," says Paul, 36. Grant says he enjoyed it--he just wasn't sure about the men who directed it. "As it turns out," Grant says, "Chris and Paul are probably the most highbrow directors I've ever met. Bizarrely so. They sit around on the set reading Freud and Dostoevsky."Hornby is a step or 12 behind...
  • Boycotting The Blockbusters

    Folks, the only we way we're getting through this summer is by being honest with ourselves. We did not have fun watching "The Scorpion King." No, listen, I'm telling you, we didn't. And we're not gonna have fun watching "Spider-Man" next week. (Or at least you won't-I saw it about two weeks ago and, put it this way, I ain't going back. At least "Scorpion King" is short.)I know it felt like fun watching The Rock strike poses so hammy he should've been laced with pineapple. But see, that was movie-studio-generated fake fun-they pay $100 million for it, which is why it feels so real. What you really felt was bored. We're being honest here, remember, so ask yourselves: did your pulse really quicken during any of the fight scenes? Did you feel even a second of genuine suspense? Was the outcome ever in doubt? Now, before you answer, close your eyes and remember what it was like watching, say, "The Matrix"-for the first time or even for the 40th. Yeah, thought so.The summer movie season,...
  • Movies: Talk About A Hairy Situation

    It might not be possible to make a funnier movie about body hair and table manners than "Human Nature." Those are some tricky subjects, two places your average screenwriter might not dare to go. But the screenwriter in this case is Charlie Kaufman, author of "Being John Malkovich," a film about a puppeteer who finds a portal into an actor's brain. Next to that, body hair is a breeze.Kaufman's hilarious tale, directed by French music-video auteur Michel Gondry, charts the intersecting lives of three very curious characters: Lila (Patricia Arquette), a nature writer with a rare, extreme-body-hair disorder; her husband, Nathan (Tim Robbins), a stuffy behaviorist who teaches etiquette to lab rats, and Puff (Rhys Ifans), a man raised in the wild as a monkey. After finding Puff during a hike, the couple decides to teach him how to be human. For Nathan, "being human" means using the proper fork. Puff, however, learns a different lesson when he spies Nathan having sex with his French...
  • Newsmakers

    It's no surprise that Oprah Winfrey doesn't have all day to curl up with a good novel, but shelving her beloved book club? Didn't see that one coming. "It has become harder and harder," Winfrey said in a statement last week, "to find books on a monthly basis that I feel absolutely compelled to share." A spokesperson for Winfrey clarified that she will continue to pick books periodically. But the monthly segment on her talk show is over. "It makes me sad," says author Wally Lamb, whose novel "She's Come Undone" was one of 46 Oprah choices in the club's six-year history. "But I'm glad to hear the faucet's not shut off entirely." (So are publishing houses, which have come to depend on Oprah's turbo boosts.) The talk-show segments were never good for ratings, though Winfrey always insisted she didn't care. She did care about having enough time to find the right book. "I'm asking viewers to invest up to $23," she told NEWSWEEK last year. "So it has to be an A-plus read." Without Oprah's...
  • Primal Screamer

    It is a cliche of celebrity profiles to begin with the subject's arriving for the interview--Gwyneth walked into the hotel lobby, a vision in red...--and, typically, the gimmick is contrived and pointless. But then you watch Andrew W.K., the planet's next rock star, walk into the lobby of New York's Hotel Chelsea, and this is what you see: a tall, muscular man wearing a filthy white T shirt, filthy white jeans and filthy white Nike high-tops. So filthy, in fact, that "white" is really incorrect. His clothing is brown. (Later, in his hotel room, you will notice an open suitcase containing three more white T shirts, all as soiled as the one he's wearing.) He is also unshaven, unshowered and pocked with random blue pen marks on his biceps, which, when you think about it, is a really strange place for pen marks. Over the next few hours, Andrew W.K. will turn out to be among the sweetest people you've ever met. He is immediately the dirtiest.In the Britney era, can a man who looks like...
  • Newsmakers

    The bride (wedding no. 4) wore white. Michael Jackson (two ex-wives) held her train. Liz Taylor (eight weddings) forgot her shoes and showed up late but still got billed as the "maid" of honor. The 48-year-old groom (wedding No. 1, but a lifelong love of Shirley Temple memorabilia) played straight man to it all. Perhaps it's too early to call the Liza Minnelli-David Gest nuptials the Wedding of the Century, but they certainly rank as one of the strangest. And it gets stranger. The lovebirds tore themselves away from their London honeymoon to go on "Larry King Live," where they announced that they hoped to adopt a child and, more important, planned a Liza comeback tour. The next day thieves tried to rip the diamonds off the 56-year-old bride's neck while she and her husband waited at a traffic light. They were both unhurt, thank goodness. After all, Liza hasn't been this entertaining in years.KITT and KaboodleSaddam's Novel HobbyBlame It on the Buddha