Eleanor Clift

Stories by Eleanor Clift

  • ‘Dying Isn’t Hard, Parking Is’

    I was among the legion that visited Art Buchwald at the Washington hospice he called home for several months last year, and where he expected to die. He had chosen at age 80 to forego dialysis and accept his fate. Except death didn’t come. His weakened kidneys rallied and so did his spirits.He turned the sunny day room where he held court into a European salon reminiscent of the era when he wrote from Paris for the New York Herald Tribune. All sorts of people came by to pay their respects. And Art loved it. He sat back in a reclining chair, enjoying the accolades, his leg—that had been amputated below the knee—propped up on a pillow. “Dying isn’t hard, parking is,” he would tell visitors.Art was having such a good time that some of the professionals at the hospice worried he wasn’t taking the business of dying seriously enough. Art wasn’t religious, but he thought of himself as a cultural Jew and spent time with a rabbi, planning his funeral service. He thought that was enough, but...
  • 'Give Us a Chance'

    Virginia Senator John Warner is the senior Republican on the Senate Armed Services Committee and a trusted voice on both sides of the aisle . He is withholding judgment for now on the president's new plan to send more troops to Iraq, but makes it clear in an interview with NEWSWEEK's Eleanor Clift that Congress is prepared to assert its rightful role as an equal partner in the war-making powers of the administration. Excerpts:NEWSWEEK: As we look at this confrontation between Congress and the White House over this new policy towards Iraq, a lot of people are looking to you to either lead the way to support the president, or deliver the word to him that this can’t be sustained. Please give me a sense of where you are.Warner: When I got back from Iraq in October I made the statement that this situation is neither going forward or backward; it’s going sideways…At the current time I’ve indicated that [the president’s plan] deserves very serious consideration by the Congress. I’m...
  • Around The House We Call Chelsea "46"

    Democrats in Washington have found a subtle new way to annoy Republicans: Every chance they get, they're starting to refer to Bill Clinton as "42." The idea is clear enough--that Hillary Clinton will be "44," a wink at the way the Bushes have long referred to George H.W. as "41" and W. as "43." The new Clinton nickname is spreading "like a wave," says Democratic strategist Mark Siegel, who says he casually drops the reference into conversations with Republicans and then waits for the reaction. Usually, he says, it's a blank stare. "Then a look of understanding, and then a look of anger." Makes us crack up every time. And people say Washington doesn't have a sense of humor.
  • Carter's Team Remembers Ford

    In interviews with NEWSWEEK's Eleanor Clift, Carter's vice president and longtime press secretary share their recollections of the man who preceded them in the White House.
  • Last Word: Jimmy Carter

    Former president Jimmy Carter has long been regard-ed as an elder statesman, using his political muscle to address issues like democracy and human rights. But he's also been a prolific author. Since leaving office in January 1981, he has written 23 books, on subjects ranging from American moral values to his childhood on a Georgia farm. His latest--and perhaps most controversial--offering, "Palestine: Peace Not Apartheid," reflects his long interest in the Middle East. (As president, he personally negotiated peace between Israel and Egypt.) But it has also drawn fire for its use of the word apartheid to describe the current circumstances of the Palestinian people. While the book has shot up the best-seller list, the former president has been denounced for his criticism of Israel. He's also come under fire from former Carter Center associate Kenneth Stein, a professor of Middle Eastern studies at Emory University, who has raised questions about the book's accuracy. (Disclosure:...
  • Lies and Obfuscations

    In the spirit of holding our political leaders accountable, this year-end review will tabulate the worst lies told by Bush and company, along with several stories that were underreported in the media. Much of what was generated got lost in the fog of war, but the long arm of history will retrieve these moments. As the president said in his news conference this week, if they’re still writing about No. 1—George Washington—there’s plenty of time before the historians can properly evaluate No. 43. Judging by the mess in Iraq, it could be 200 or 300 years—if ever—before Bush is vindicated.Bush has shifted his rhetoric in deference to the grim and deteriorating reality on the ground in Iraq. Asked by a reporter on Oct. 25 if we are winning the war, Bush said, “Absolutely, we’re winning.” Offered the opportunity at his press conference to defend that statement, Bush has adopted a new formulation. He now says, “We’re not winning, but we’re not losing.” That sounds like the definition of a...
  • No Pandering Here

    Every so often a politician comes along who doesn’t pander to the president. Fresh off a nasty campaign that centered on the war in Iraq, Virginia Senator-elect Jim Webb had no interest in a picture of himself with President Bush, and he didn’t want to exchange small talk with the man whose war policies he opposes. So he skipped the receiving line at a White House reception for newly elected members of Congress, creating the first of what we should all hope will be many ripples in Washington.Webb’s  presumed snub of Bush is rare enough in a city where everybody who’s anybody has a glory wall, and social occasions are geared to a parade of picture taking. But what happened next is where the story really takes off. President Bush, spying Webb across the room, walked over to him and asked, “How’s your boy?” Webb’s son is a Marine in Iraq.A more seasoned politician might have been flattered that the president knew his son was in the line of fire and bothered to ask about him. That...
  • Second Chance

    What sweet vindication it must be for Mississippi Republican Trent Lott to once again emerge victorious among his Senate colleagues. The White House engineered his downfall four years ago, and now Lott has made a remarkable comeback, winning the No. 2 leadership post in the Senate at a time when Karl Rove, the principal figure who betrayed him, looks out of touch.It is a personal and political triumph for Lott, 65, who was forced out as majority leader of the Senate in 2002 after remarks he made at an event marking South Carolina Sen. Strom Thurmond’s 100th birthday. Lott said that if Thurmond had been elected president in 1948, “we wouldn’t have had all these problems over the years …” Thurmond ran as a segregationist Dixiecrat, and Lott’s words were interpreted as racist.For a party that has just been through a big loss, and whose commitment to minority voters is a question mark, elevating Lott seems like a dubious move. The voters of Virginia punished Republican Sen. George Allen...
  • The Slapdown of Polarization

    Republican pollster Neil Newhouse knew the day his party lost the Senate. It was Sept. 29, and he circled it on his calendar. That was the morning excerpts from Bob Woodard’s book “State of Denial” broke, chronicling an administration in disarray that was not being truthful with the American people about how bad things were in Iraq.That same day, a congressional committee issued a report documenting 400-plus contacts between indicted lobbyist Jack Abramoff and the White House, and Republican congressman Mark Foley resigned after revelations that he had pursued underage congressional pages.Newhouse said the date is “burned in my mind” just like another date in another era—Oct. 19, 1982—when unemployment hit 10.1 percent and signaled big losses in Congress for the GOP and President Reagan. These catalytic events have the impact of freezing the electorate, Newhouse told an audience gathered for post-election analysis at the nonpartisan Israel Project in Washington. “We just couldn’t...
  • The Pelosi Years

    Democrats have won the House, ending a 12-year drought. And Nancy Pelosi is on her way to becoming Speaker, becoming the first woman ever to hold the job. It’s a time for the long-suffering party to celebrate. But keeping the party's new majority will be a test, and the tone Democrats set over the next days and weeks will create a first impression for the voters that will be hard to change if they don’t get it right.This is not a majority made from cookie-cutter liberals. These are men and women winning in districts that were drawn for Republicans. Some are pro-life, some pro-gun, some sound so Republican they might be in the other party if it weren’t for President Bush and the Iraq war. It will take all of Pelosi’s skills as a manager and disciplinarian to forge a coalition out of these philosophical disparities.The voters, tired of Washington's divisive ways, want to see the two parties cooperate; it will be Pelosi's challenge to make that a reality. Pelosi might have looked...
  • Money Moves

    Races that were never in play before are suddenly on Chuck Schumer’s radar screen. The feisty and sometimes abrasive New York senator runs the Democratic Senate Campaign Committee like it’s the campaign of a lifetime, and if the Democrats wrest control from the ruling party during a time of war, he deserves much of the credit. His counterpart, North Carolina Sen. Elizabeth Dole, has been no match, running the GOP campaign effort like a bureaucratic exercise and just one more box to check on her illustrious resume.With the election just days away, Schumer met with reporters Thursday to announce he was moving a million dollars into Arizona, a GOP stronghold, where tracking numbers show a little-known challenger, Jim Pederson, within striking distance of Republican Sen. Jon Kyl. Told the Republicans were putting more resources into Maryland and Michigan, where their candidates were closing, Schumer grinned, “God bless ’em”. Noting that polls were putting Michigan Democratic Sen. Debbie...
  • Transition

    Gerry Eastman Studds, 69 The first openly gay member of Congress, Studds was censured by the House in 1983 for having had a sexual relationship a decade earlier with a 17-year-old page. The affair was consensual, though the young man was underage according to the law at that time. The voters in his Cape Cod-area district re-elected him a year later with 56 percent of the vote. Studds served in Congress until 1997, a strong voice for the environment and for gay rights. His name resurfaced in the current page scandal on Capitol Hill when Republicans cited the Democrats' failure to force his resignation over charges similar to those against Florida Rep. Mark Foley. After gay marriage was legalized in Massachusetts, Studds married his partner, Dean Hara. "He gave people of his generation, or my generation, or future generations, the courage to do whatever they wanted," said Hara.
  • Out of Control

    Republicans booed their likely next House speaker, Nancy Pelosi, when she rose to speak Wednesday evening “not only as Democratic leader but as a mother and grandmother.” Some shouted “Jefferson,” a lame attempt to find equivalency between a disgraced Democrat, Louisiana Rep. William Jefferson, currently under investigation for allegedly taking kickbacks, and Florida Republican Mark Foley, whose sexually predatory e-mails to teenage House pages has set off a round of recriminations among Republicans.With the midterm election just five weeks away and GOP House leaders forming a circular firing squad, Pelosi is close to the point where she can start measuring the drapes in the speaker’s office. Even before Foley surfaced as an embarrassment for the Republicans, they were on track to lose their majority. The fact that the leaders of a political party known for stoking homophobia to win votes stood aside and did nothing for years to rein in Foley is further evidence the party has lost...
  • Shifting the Spotlight

    A friendly looking bear of a man, Dennis Hastert provided a much needed image makeover for the Republicans when he took over as House speaker in January 1999. The Democrats had gained seats in the midterm election, repudiating the GOP’s zealous pursuit of President Clinton, and the Republicans were at sea over the leadership of their fractured party.With Newt Gingrich discredited and his designated successor, Louisiana Rep. Bob Livingston, taking himself out of contention after confessing he had been unfaithful to his wife, the party turned to the grandfatherly Hastert, a former high-school teacher and wrestling coach with an impeccable personal life.Never a strong leader but a good public face, Hastert was the congenial front man for a party whose real power was Tom DeLay. Love him or loath him, DeLay ran the House with a steely precision, punishing anybody who crossed him and serving up Republican majorities for whatever the White House wanted. After DeLay left earlier this year,...
  • Team Clinton

    Suddenly Bill Clinton is everywhere, solving poverty, tackling AIDS, hosting Laura Bush, crafting the Democrats' message and deflecting questions about his wife's likely run for president. He doesn't know if he wants her to run, or if she'll run, and if she runs, he doesn't know that she'll win. “A million things can happen,” he said. But he does know one thing, that if she got elected, “she would be a magnificent president,” he told CNN’s Larry King this week.Clinton is a force of nature, the shade tree for Hillary as she ventures out of the senatorial cocoon to vie for the presidency. Shade is mostly a good thing, but not always, and the yin-yang role of the former president in his wife's political life is understood by both of them. Unlike Al Gore, Hillary is at ease with her husband’s idiosyncrasies and has learned over a long marriage how to mitigate the damages.As for Bill, he is her best strategist, with a fingertip feel for the electorate that is unrivaled. Thanks to the...
  • Study in Anguish

    In this season of war and politics, members of Congress are in the dock, none more so than Connecticut Republican Chris Shays. An ardent supporter of the war, Shays abruptly reversed course to join critics in calling for a firm deadline-based timetable “to wake up the Iraqis” so U.S. troops could begin to withdraw from Iraq. With polls showing him trailing his antiwar Democratic challenger, Diane Farrell, Shays’s conversion was seen as expedient rather than principled. Shays, however, denies this charge and says that it has shaken him.Meeting with reporters Thursday morning in Washington, Shays was a case study in anguish. His party botched the job in Iraq, and he’s lost his credibility and maybe his belief  in the process. “I am struggling with my faith,” he said, declining to elaborate. Shays has come to this breakfast to regain his credibility, to convince his media inquisitors that he is not playing politics but is “an honest purveyor of what I see.” He is wrestling with his...
  • Hand-to-Hand Combat

    Let the talking heads and the lawyers debate the new U.S. Army field-manual rules about interrogation. Democrats should play rope-a-dope, absorb the blows and put the spotlight on President Bush’s empty rhetoric about winning the war against terrorism.  Five years after 9/11, Osama bin Laden is still on the loose and Americans don’t think the Iraq war is making them safer.What Bush did in his speeches this week is the national-security version of the perp walk. By rolling out a rogue’s gallery of scary-looking Middle Eastern men, Bush transformed a debate about a ruinous war in Iraq into hand-to-hand political combat over which party has captured more bad guys.Given Bush’s sorry record and all the other conversations the media could be having, the renewed emphasis on terrorism is good news for Republicans. Democrats can’t change the channel. They’ve got to win on the ground that Bush has established. That means thinking like Karl Rove and going after the opposition’s strength until...
  • Elections: Shays' Sudden Shift

    Connecticut Republican Christopher Shays has long been an ardent backer of the war in Iraq. But after returning last week from his 14th trip to the country, the congressman reported that little progress had been made--and called for a "fixed timeline" for the withdrawal of U.S. troops. He plans to hold three hearings next month in the House subcommittee on government reform, which he chairs, to examine the consequences of a phased withdrawal. "We need to send a very powerful message to the Iraqis that there is not an open checkbook and our soldiers are not going to be in harm's way indefinitely," Shays told NEWSWEEK.His new position is a significant break among Republicans in Bush's firewall on the war going into the November elections. When Shays called the Iraqi desk at the National Security Council to alert it of what he calls "an evolution in my thinking," he assured the staffer on duty that he remains "strongly supportive of what I see as a noble cause." But Shays has his re...
  • GOP Playbook

    President Bush is boasting about all the books he read this summer, including a tome by the French existentialist, Albert Camus, “and three Shakespeares,” he told NBC’s Brian Williams. Three Shakespeares? Presumably the president means plays. Williams pressed for more detail. The biography of Joe DiMaggio, which was on last year’s reading list, seemed more to his liking. “As you know, I like to keep expectations low,” Bush parried, a hint of testiness beneath the cowboy amiability.Some 63 percent of Americans oppose the Iraq war, according to the latest NEWSWEEK poll , and they deserve better from their president than a calculated verbal assault that calls them appeasers and Fascist sympathizers. This is a new low for Bush, but not surprising given his family history. The Bushes, father and son, traditionally run viciously negative campaigns to win elections. With polls showing the Democrats poised to win control of the House and possibly the Senate, the Bushies are ramping up the...
  • The Fear Factor

    If you think things are bad now, they will be worse if we leave. That’s the essence of President Bush’s argument for staying the course in Iraq. Bush is doing what he always does—shamelessly ramping up the fear factor. He says if U.S. troops leave Iraq, the terrorists will be right behind them, bringing Baghdad to America. He’s brought ruin to Iraq and his policies are helping create our worst nightmare, a nuclear Iran. How much worse can it get?Bush’s original sin was to politicize U.S. intervention in Iraq. He used the war to transform an aimless presidency into one of Churchillian dimensions, and now that it’s all turned sour, he has nothing to fall back on. Bush is as beleaguered now as Lyndon Johnson was during Vietnam—with one key difference. The worse the news is from Iraq, the more positive Bush is that he’s right. As Vietnam raged on, Johnson became less certain he was doing the right thing.Victory no longer appears possible in Iraq, yet Bush’s rhetoric is more bullish than...
  • The Osama Card

    It will soon be five years since the 9/11 attacks thrust America into a state of perpetual anxiety, and the man who inspired and masterminded the carnage that awful day remains at large. He’s almost certainly in Pakistan, way up on the northern border, almost to China, and with the November elections approaching, the name of Osama bin Laden will once again surface as a powerful symbol of who’s with us and who’s against us.A Republican Senate hopeful in New York is already linking Hillary Clinton to Osama in a television ad that attacks Clinton for voting against the Patriot Act and speaking out against the administration’s unauthorized wiretapping. Former Yonkers mayor John Spencer has no chance of unseating the New York senator, but for Democrats, Osama is the wild card. They remember how he surfaced in a video the weekend before the ’04 presidential election, reminding the country of 9/11 and helping turn fearful voters toward President Bush, who was seen as the tougher of the two...
  • Holding Pattern

    It was vintage Rumsfeld. Responding to Hillary Clinton’s assertion that his optimistic assurances about Iraq have gone unfulfilled, the Defense secretary insisted that his view of the war has never been overly rosy. “I understand this is tough stuff,” he said, challenging the New York senator to find something he said that would back up her accusation.The testy exchange took place in Washington on Thursday as the Senate Armed Services Committee grilled Rumsfeld along with Gen. Peter Pace, chairman of the Joint Chiefs, and Gen. John Abizaid, the top commander of U.S. forces in Iraq. The dismissive tone that Rumsfeld customarily takes toward his critics was largely absent as he fielded questions about the increased sectarian violence and looming likelihood of civil war in Iraq.The best any of this trio of apologists could come up with is that U.S. forces need to keep doing what they’re doing to keep from losing. They offered no strategy for victory, only a holding pattern to prevent a...
  • 400,000 Frozen Embryos

    There’s no daylight between President Bush and what any Democrat is saying about the Middle East conflict. Polls show that Americans sympathize with Israel but don’t want us to get drawn into the fighting. The small band of neocons who beat the drums for war with Iraq are trying to goad Bush into doing whatever it takes to get rid of Hizbullah in Lebanon.“It reminds me of that old schoolyard taunt: ‘You and what army?’” says Matt Bennett of Third Way, a centrist group founded to challenge liberal orthodoxy. The neocons have not lost their faith in American invasions even as the fallout from Iraq emboldens Syria and Iran and threatens to engulf the region in all-out war. What this latest outbreak of violence means for Bush’s portfolio as he leads his party into the fall elections is anybody’s guess. It could overshadow the mess in Iraq and serve as a distraction for Republicans, or it could help Democrats by reminding voters how everything seems to be coming apart on Bush’s watch.If...
  • First Phase?

    We were at the Lebanese border last week taking turns peering through binoculars at a Hizbullah outpost while getting briefed by an Israeli commander. The desert landscape looked deceptively calm and we could see a U.N. encampment located right next to Hizbullah. We clowned around a bit for the benefit of those who might be staring back at us, and we asked our briefer about fears that Hizbullah might stage a surprise attack and capture soldiers the way Hamas had done from Gaza. He said that had been tried many times, and assured us the soldiers on duty were ready.A week later, when I was back home in the States after a “political pundit tour” of Israel with other journalists, the tranquil scene we had observed became the bloody launch of a new and violent wave of hostilities. Hizbullah crossed over into Israeli sovereign territory to abduct two soldiers (leaving eight others dead), prompting retaliatory bombing by Israel that has rapidly escalated into something approaching full...
  • Slow, Painful Change

    We arrived at the prime minister’s office an hour after the Hamas groups holding a captured Israeli soldier issued an ultimatum demanding the release of Arab prisoners in exchange for his freedom. In meetings with Israeli officials, we tried to decipher whether the ongoing crisis is the first phase of the next war, or just another roadblock on the ever elusive path to peace.Brinkmanship is a way of life in the Middle East. Israel ignored the deadline and the standoff continued through the week as Hamas fired more rockets into Israeli towns and Israeli troops pushed deeper into Gaza—territory they only recently withdrew from, and that is now under the control of the new Hamas government. The military action would soon claim the lives of one Israeli soldier and some 23 Palestinians.When I told friends I was visiting Israel, they expressed concern for my safety. One friend sent me a St. Christopher’s medal. “It’s a Catholic thing,” she said. Yet for all the tension over what Hamas...
  • Political Theater

    You have to go back to the Alien and Sedition Acts of the 1790s to find Congress so outrageously trying to stifle dissent. Signed by President John Adams to quash newspapers aligned with rival Thomas Jefferson, some 25 people were arrested and 10 editors and publishers convicted under these laws. This time around, at least, the resolution passed by the U.S. House of Representatives on Thursday condemning news organizations for publishing classified information has no force of law. It’s pure political theater.Warring with the mainstream media is standard Republican foolery. The first President Bush encouraged his supporters to heckle the press. ANNOY THE MEDIA—RE-ELECT BUSH was a popular bumper sticker in 1992—Bush backers even charged through the media center at the Republican National Convention shouting the slogan. Bush was lionized by the right for taking on CBS's Dan Rather in a heated exchange over his role in the Iran-contra scandal. But the media bashing wasn’t enough to...
  • Rove’s Trap

    Our towel-snapping president is feeling better. He joked and jostled with the press for almost an hour, high on adrenalin after his secret trip to Baghdad. Thanks to skilled lawyering, his adviser Karl Rove is back in business framing the November election as a referendum on cut-and-run Democrats.Rove is following a time-honored tactic: hang a lantern on your problem. Iraq is George Bush’s biggest problem, ergo Rove’s strategy: showcase the war, frame the choice between victory and defeatism, put the Democrats on the defensive. Moments after learning he had escaped indictment in the CIA leak investigation case, Rove told New Hampshire Republicans that Democratic critics of the war like John Kerry and John Murtha “give the green light to go to war, but when it gets tough, they fall back on that party’s old platform of cutting and running. They may be with you for the first few bullets, but they won’t be there for the last tough battles.”It’s appalling that an administration led by...
  • The Iraq Effect

    The death of the top-ranking operative of Al Qaeda in Iraq is a welcome moment of clarity in a war desperately in search of a rationale. Abu Mussab al-Zarqawi personified the face of evil and was controversial even among jihadists for staging large-scale attacks on civilians. The news out of Iraq has been gloomy for so long that Zarqawi’s demise, along with the agreement on the remaining cabinet ministers to fill out the new government, may buy some time with the American public, and give President Bush the breathing space to figure out what to do next when he meets with his advisers at Camp David next week.Bush was subdued and didn’t overplay his hand when he stood in the Rose Garden early Thursday morning to commend U.S. forces for the successful bomb attack on the house where Zarqawi had been meeting with his lieutenants. The Jordanian-born Zarqawi led the foreign jihadists in Iraq and incited the sectarian violence against the Shia-majority population. His death is a major...
  • Right Message, Wrong Messenger

    President Bush’s call for a “rational middle ground” on immigration injects a welcome note of sanity into the debate. But that’s not what Bush’s conservative base is looking for. They want red meat, and they won’t be placated by mostly symbolic moves like Bush’s proposal to dispatch the National Guard to the Mexican border and Senate votes to build a partial fence and limit the number of guest workers.After five and a half years of governing from the irrational exuberant right, Bush’s ability to lead the country on a middle path has been lost. He may have stumbled onto the right message, but he’s the wrong messenger. It’s like his call to break our addiction to oil, which was a line in his State of the Union Message. From a former oilman who as president championed tax breaks for more drilling, it was a brazen left-hand turn, and it went mostly unheeded.Now we’re in crisis mode with gas prices squeezing Middle America and right-wing commentator Pat Buchanan decrying the “invasion”...
  • Was Iraq Worth It?

    On Wednesday I sat in a darkened room at the Kennedy Library in Boston watching photos from Iraq projected on a wall screen as an Associated Press photographer talked about covering the anguish of war. She has produced Pulitzer Prize-winning work, her camera capturing images of bodies piled in a heap, anguished mothers and terrified children, victims of the U.S.-led invasion. But inside, she always wondered if she was in the wrong profession. "Is it more important to take pictures," she would ask herself, "or to give medical help?"That question still haunts German-born Anje Niedringhaus, winner of a 2005 Courage in Journalism award from the International Women's Media Organization (full disclosure: I am a co-chair of the IWMF). Niedringhaus was among the speakers at a panel about humanitarian intervention, a subject on a lot of people's minds right now given the worsening situation in Iraq. President Bush's job-approval rating had sunk to a perilous 31 percent, with dissatisfaction...
  • 'At Some Point, Reality Has Its Day'

    Al Gore has launched his new campaign—this one to battle the effects of global warming. At its center is a new film, “An Inconvenient Truth,” which stars Gore and has been winning surprisingly positive press. It opens May 24. The former vice president, who has abandoned a relatively low profile to promote the movie, spoke to Eleanor Clift about the environment, technology and politics in America. Excerpts: NEWSWEEK: They say timing is everything. Has the moment arrived for this issue?Al Gore: I hope it has. I hope that we are close to a tipping point beyond which the country will begin to face this very seriously and the majority of politicians in both parties will begin to compete by offering meaningful solutions. We’re nowhere close to that yet, but a tipping point by definition is a time of very rapid change—and I think that the potential for this change has been building up, with the evangelical ministers speaking out, General Electric and Republican CEOs saying we have to...
  • Gore Redux

    A movie about Al Gore giving a PowerPoint presentation about global warming doesn’t sound all that exciting, but if you liked “March of the Penguins,” you’ll love “An Inconvenient Truth.” Gore is as relentless in his travels to save the planet and faces almost as many obstacles as those penguins making their way across the tundra.Getting the country to face up to global warming is his life’s mission, and it could be his ticket to the presidency. Voters yearning for a principled leader who truly believes in something may find what they’re looking for in the former vice president. Gore told NEWSWEEK that he’s in the middle of a campaign, but it’s not a campaign for a candidate. “Been there, done that,” he said.Nobody believes him. By not playing the overt political game, Gore may be putting in place the first issue-driven campaign of the 21st century, one that is premised on a big moral challenge that is becoming more real with soaring gas prices and uncertain oil supplies. A senior...