Eve Conant

Stories by Eve Conant

  • This Week in Conservative Media: Hoping Health Care Won't Pass

    “Obamacare” is dominating the otherwise sluggish headlines this week. The National Review’s editor Rich Lowry and Robert Costa, the William F. Buckey Jr. Fellow at the National Review Institute lead the site with a hopeful salvo for conservatives: “Five Reasons It Might Not Pass.”Their No. 1 reason? “Public Revulsion.” The latest NBC/Wall St. Journal poll putting the plan’s support at a measly 32 percent with, for the first time, Americans saying they’d rather stick with the status quo than go through with the proposed health-care overhaul.Nebraska, write Lowry and Costa, is a case in point.“If Nelson is perceived to have made a career-defining choice that will end his designation as a conservative Democrat and a pro-lifer, and if he takes an immediate dive in the polls, it will cast a pall over other Blue Dogs inclined to play ball,” writes Lowry. “In that case, the various payoffs on offer won’t seem worth the larger cost of supporting the bill.”Other points on their list include...
  • How I Learned to Sled Without a Sled

    I was one of those people totally unprepared for the massive snowstorm currently hitting D.C. that's headed up north. This fact leads me to why I am writing this—fear not New Yorkers and other Northern-folk, there are lots of ways to have fun in the snow when everything is sold out.Last night when my friend Colleen mentioned renting cross-country skis I thought, brilliant! we are so ahead of the game! Urban skiing! She had called me while I was walking to get potatoes for our dinner with kids that night. The lines at the market stretched 40 people deep because, as it turned out, all D.C. residents were preparing to stash provisions and hunker down for the weekend. I should have realized that was a sign. As we waited in line, Colleen called back: the rentals had all been snatched up, as had all the skis for purchase. Not to worry, we decided. Sleds, we’d get a sled!I walked toward Logan Hardware in Northwest D.C., 5-year-old in tow, only to be met with a sign that read: Snow Sh...
  • This Week in Conservative Media: Obama Sits on the Afghan Fence

    “That was such a strange speech,” writes Victor Davis Hanson for the National Review’s The Corner. Like many other conservative writers he’s perplexed that Obama would offer more troops and a timeline for departure in basically the same breath. He’s not alone—many are wondering about what are certainly mixed messages, not just in conservative media. “I am happy that for another 18 months, Obama will fight the Taliban,” writes Hanson. “But I think that, in times of war, when troops are headed into battle, Americans would rather hear "smoke 'em out" and "dead or alive" than a Nobel Peace Prize preamble.” ...
  • This Week in Conservative Media: 'ClimateGate' and a Media Cover-Up

    Hundreds of private e-mail messages and documents by climate-change researchers were stolen from a server at a British university and circulated among global-warming skeptics last week, fanning the flames of the debate over global warming just ahead of negotiations in Copenhagen to hammer out an international climate accord. The scandal over the e-mails, some of which appear to show scientists trying to manipulate data to strengthen the case for man-made global warming and cover up data of declining temperatures, “keeps going–and growing,” writes Michelle Malkin. “There are calls on both sides of the pond for an investigation into data manipulation. A former British lord is demanding an independent inquiry.” The British lord she writes about is Lord Lawson, who is already a leading climate-change skeptic, but she lists off others who are going for the jugular.Michael Goldfarb on the Weekly Standard blog assails The New York Times for not printing the news he and skeptics say is fit...
  • Census Worker Hanging Ruled a Suicide

    Kentucky police say that census worker Bill Sparkman, whose body was discovered naked and hanging from a tree in a rural cemetery Sept. 12 with the word “Fed” scrawled across his chest, committed suicide. ...
  • Religious Leaders Warn of Civil Disobedience

    They are calling it the Manhattan Declaration, a 4,700-word manifesto reaching into scripture and signed by 148 Orthodox, Catholic, and evangelical leaders. It was released this afternoon at a press conference in Washington, D.C., and is designed to draw a line in the sand across three issues they argue are non-negotiable despite the law: the sanctity of human life, the institution of marriage as being between a man and woman, and religious freedom. ...
  • This Week in Conservative Media: Health Rationing and Mammograms

    The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force on Monday said women in their 40s should stop routinely having yearly mammograms, and older women should have them only every other year, recommendations that have divided the medical community (“It’s...
  • A Closer Look at Fort Hood Shooter’s Gun

    At least one gun used by Nidal Malik Hasan at Fort Hood was an FN Herstal 5.7 semiautomatic—which also happens to be a weapon of choice for Mexican cartels who battle the military and police. It is a favorite weapon among straw purchasers in the United States, who buy guns that are then smuggled south of the border, fueling the violence there. ...
  • This Week In Conservative Media: When it Comes to Fort Hood, Why Ask Why?

    “I could not believe I was hearing that question all weekend: why did he do it? Why did a Muslim, in touch with Al Qaeda, open fire on U.S. military personnel?” asks Rush Limbaugh. “I tell you something, folks, political correctness and a lot of other things are gonna lead to our downfall.” Limbaugh also discusses how the House Judiciary Committee just voted to strip the Patriot Act of a provision allowing the government to spy on people who are not linked to known terrorist groups, i.e. “lone wolves.” ...
  • "This Is a Betrayal": A Chaplain Discusses the Long Recovery From Fort Hood and the Lasting Legacy of PTSD

    An ordained Baptist chaplain and army captain, Roger Benimoff spent two tours of duty in Iraq and months between deployments counseling soldiers in the U.S. During his career, he provided spiritual guidance to American soldiers through crises of faith, bereavement, and trauma until he himself broke down. While training and working as a chaplain at Walter Reed during the height of its crisis, Benimoff was diagnosed with chronic PTSD and spent months of treatment at some of the facilities where he trained as a caretaker. NEWSWEEK's Eve Conant has tracked Benimoff's experiences over the years, starting with his time at Walter Reed, and recently in a book about his experiences, Faith Under Fire. Benimoff retired from the army earlier this year. He spoke with Conant from Dallas, where he is a hospital chaplain, about what might have happened in Fort Hood, how the military families will cope with tragedy on the homefront, and why the army pushed him so far he had to leave....
  • Maine Looked Like Promising Ground for Gay Rights, Until Tuesday

    Maine should have been an example of strength in numbers for gay-marriage proponents but instead turned into heartache. If you don't count the District of Columbia, according to Gary Gates of the Williams Institute, a think tank at UCLA's school of law devoted to gay-rights policies, Maine "has the highest number of same-sex couples per 1,000 households (so the highest per capita) of any state." So what happened?...
  • This Week in Conservative Media: Is NY-23 Outcome a Sign of Victory for Conservatives?

    Last week Glenn Beck prophesied that Sarah Palin was on a potential roll with her upcoming book tour, one that might carry her into 2012—as a real rogue. Beck told Bill O’Reilly that her resignation as governor was a smart move, and that “she’s also positioning herself for a third party. By the time this election runs around for the president, I'm sorry, but unless the Republicans and the Democrats wake up, a third party will win,” he said....
  • This Week in Conservative Media: Afghanistan and Health Care 'In Big Trouble'

    The question of Afghanistan and what to do with it is looming large this week in the conservative blogosphere. Early yesterday, Hot Air blogger Ed Morrissey called out New York Sen. Chuck Schumer for endorsing an "unusual strategy in Afghanistan—the very 'air raiding villages and bombing civilians' that Barack Obama derided as a candidate." Morrissey, also known as "Captain Ed" to his readers, says Democrats have argued since 2006 to shift the focus away from Iraq and toward Afghanistan. "Now that they’re on the hook for making those decisions, suddenly 'air raiding villages and bombing civilians'— exactly what Schumer offers as an alternative—looks attractive."Many have weighed in, but a political cartoon posted on Red State does a decent job of illustrating the conservative mood the past few days on Obama’s handling of Afghanistan. (Newt Gingrich gets his official RINO —Republican in Name Only—creds in another GOP cartoon for his...
  • This Week in Conservative Media: Apparently, Mao Is Not Dead

    At least he's not if you’re a conservative pundit tracking the Obama administration. It’s been almost a week since Glenn Beck ran a segment featuring White House Communications Director Anita Dunn counting Mao Zedong and Mother Teresa among two of her favorite political philosophers, and the “mainstream media,” according to Bill O’Reilly, are still refusing to deal with it.O’Reilly, mystified, asked Brit Hume: “Look, what if you said, well, look, Hitler came out of nowhere after the Weimar Republic and singlehandedly raised himself up to a führer level. Gee, he was a pretty good political strategist. If you had done that, then everybody in the world would have been condemning you. Yet you can take a Mao Zedong, arguably a worse mass murderer than Hitler, and nobody says a word. Doesn't that strike you as strange?" There might be one answer to why no one is paying attention, muses O’Reilly, “Maybe, maybe, the strategy of the White House to isolate Fox News is working....
  • The Kindest Cut

    One day, when Sila Folow was an 8-year-old girl living in Mali, four elderly women held her down on the dirt floor of an outhouse and, in keeping with local tradition, used a sharp blade to cut out her clitoris and most of her labia. Her grandmother and other villagers held a celebration. Sila, bleeding and in terrible pain, could not walk for weeks. Like millions of other African girls who are forced to undergo female genital mutilation—a ritual many women say is intended to ensure that they grow up to become sexually passive wives who will not stray from their husbands—Sila never recovered. She eventually moved to New York, married, and had two children. But she was reluctant to have sex with her husband. It hurt, and the scarring made it impossible for her to feel pleasure.
  • The 16th Minute: Andrew Speaker

    Then: While in Rome for his honeymoon in May 2007, Andrew Speaker learns he has an extreme form of drug-resistant tuberculosis. He flies to Montreal, crosses the border, gets quarantined by the U.S. government and sparks a TB scare. A month later, it's revealed his diagnosis was incorrect. owNow: Speaker and his wife have separated. On April 28, he filed suit against the CDC, arguing that it "knowingly and misleadingly released false information" about his medical history. He still occasionally gets death threats. "I just delete them," he says. "All I can do is wake up each day and smile."
  • Fast Chat: The Economist's John Micklethwait

    The Economist's John Micklethwait and Adrian Wooldridge's new book, "God Is Back," argues that as the world grows more modern, it also becomes more religious. This is a good thing, the authors say: although religion can spawn bloodshed, the American ideals that have modernized faith can also channel the world away from violence. Micklethwait spoke to NEWSWEEK's Eve Conant. ...
  • A Very Hellish Journey

    Jay Dobyns convinced the Hells Angels he was one of them. And that may have been the easy part. After going undercover, he's been a man on the run.
  • Can Meditation Help At-Risk Kids?

    Transcendental meditation is meant to make kids calmer, happier. But for some parents, it's having the opposite effect.
  • Obama’s New Gospel

    What does Barack Obama believe? It's a question that an army of surrogates, out trying to assure religious voters of his faith, is answering again and again.
  • The Papal Coffee Line

    The pope's word wasn't the only thing the audience in Washington was waiting for.