Howard Fineman

Stories by Howard Fineman

  • Jockeying For 1996

    At first glance, it looks like a Republican intramural Little Big Horn, with Dan Quayle in the role of a surrounded and imperiled General Custer. At last count no fewer than a dozen Republicans are thinking--with one degree of intensity or another--about running for president in 1996 after what they assume will be George Bush's second term. The list ranges from the exalted, such as Secretary of Defense Dick Cheney and Secretary of State James Baker, to the relatively obscure, such as South Carolina Gov. Carroll Campbell. "We've got one hell of a farm team," says GOP insider Stuart Spencer. ...
  • The New Politics Of Race

    As distrust and resentment grow between blacks and whites, Washington strategists manipulate the tensions with clever slogans and divisive labels ...
  • Schwarzkopf For President?

    Van Poole, the Republican chairman in Florida, is under pressure. Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf III - the hottest nonpolitical political commodity since Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower - happens to reside in Tampa, Fla., near MacDill Air Force Base. Businessmen there who've shot skeet with him say he's One of Them: a Republican. They think he can be talked into running for the U.S. Senate in Florida. All Poole has to do is set up the meeting. He's lined up a Miami finance guy and a Washington consultant, ready for rapid deployment. "I guess I should be at the bottom of the stairs when he comes off the plane," says Poole. ...
  • Demonizing The Sixties

    Politicians, especially Republicans, like to link their opponents to a villain. But Willie Horton is history and Saddam Hussein soon may be. Where to turn? Running against the media is dicey. Calling your foe "unpatriotic" is unseemly, especially if you skipped military service yourself or voted to sell Saddam grain before he invaded Kuwait. So the GOP has found a new all-purpose enemy: the '60s. Democrats who voted against the president on the gulf war, intoned GOP Sen. Phil Gramm last week, were "lost in the '60s." Other Republicans echoed the line. ...
  • Dream On, Democrats

    Right now Bush looks unbeatable, but his battered opponents are working on their winning fantasies ...
  • Heads Up! The End Of Obscurity

    Dr. Louis Sullivan, the secretary of Health and Human Services, had been suffering from Washington's dread social disease, lack of visibility. Here he was, a well-trained, fair-minded physician with a good grasp of the issues - and he was getting neither ink nor air time. In his case, routine treatment was prescribed. The New York Times, somehow, got hold of an uncharacteristically stinging, "confidential letter" from Sullivan protesting proposed cuts in the HHS budget for the "aged and disabled." The result: instant front-page visibility. ...