John Barry

Stories by John Barry

  • All Unhappy On The Eastern Front

    A Kiev factory that once made tanks now produces small tractors. Missile plants that turned out SS-20s are building prams and washing machines. The aeronautics design company that created the Su-27 fighter has refrigerators on its drawing boards. Consumer products already account for perhaps 40 percent of the Soviet defense industry's output. But for Mikhail Gorbachev, continued conversion of the Soviet military machine is a must. It's a prerequisite of significant Western aid and investment. ...
  • A New Sdi Plan

    The headlines are all about cutbacks in Star Wars, but another game is being played behind the scenes in Washington. The White House and key legislators are discussing a ground-based defense against limited missile attacks--in hopes the Soviets may be willing to amend a treaty to make the deployments legal. ...
  • Remaking The Cia

    With a change in directors, the agency faces a new challenge: to redefine its methods and its mission ...
  • A Textbook Victory

    At West Point, Norman Schwarzkopf's favorite course was the History of Military Art. The young cadet buried himself in the legendary campaigns of Alexander the Great, of Caesar, Hannibal and Napoleon. He was not, he admits, a straight-A student. No matter: last week Schwarzkopf took his true final exam. It is very likely that from now on, West Pointers taking the course on strategy they call the Art of War will study the Persian Gulf campaign of Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf. ...
  • What Really Happened

    The one word nobody in the Bush administration wanted to use last week was "decapitation." Last fall the U.S. Air Force chief of staff, Gen. Michael J. Dugan, was fired in part for suggesting that Saddam Hussein himself was a legitimate target of allied air power. After last week's raid on the Amiriya shelter in Baghdad, at the cost of several hundred civilian lives, it seems that Dugan was not exactly wrong. He was merely indiscreet. NEWSWEEK has learned that allied intelligence previously identified the bunker as one of perhaps two dozen meant to shelter Saddam's inner circle, the leaders and families of the Revolutionary Command Council and the ruling Baath Party. "There is space in [the city's] air-raid bunkers for just 1 percent of the population of Baghdad," said an allied government source. "We know that because we've mapped the bunkers. Now, which 1 percent do you think is allowed in those bunkers?" ...
  • War's New Science

    A cost-free victory. A push-button, remote-control war won without casualties. Surgical strikes that wipe out military targets while sparing civilians. Anyone with a television set, watching videos of American bombs sailing through Iraqi doorways and down air shafts, must wonder: if these weapons were just a little more gee-whiz, couldn't the grunts and their ground assaults be dispensed with altogether? With a lethal land battle looming in the Persian Gulf, the fantasy of war made bloodless by science is all the more beguiling. ...
  • 'Good To Go'

    There are three crucial questions confronting George Bush this week. The first is: how effective is the allied bombing campaign against Saddam Hussein's military machine? The second is: how do we know whether the bombing has been effective or not? And the third is how to open the long-awaited ground attack against Iraqi forces. NEWSWEEK has learned that the Bush administration and its British and French allies are now contemplating not one ground offensive but two: the first would be a limited action aimed at drawing Iraqi Republican Guard units out of their fortified positions astride the Iraq-Kuwait border. If the tactic is approved, it would be a major change in allied plans for the gulf war. "It may well be that one way to make the air campaign more effective is to add other elements," Defense Secretary Dick Cheney told reporters on his plane bound for Saudi Arabia last week. ...
  • The Nuclear Option: Thinking The Unthinkable

    Ponder, for a moment, the unthinkable. The initial assault on Iraqi forces is thrown back. Iraq responds with a barrage of chemical and biological weapons, killing 10,000 U.S. soldiers and at least as many allies. The United States has only one option: a tactical nuclear strike. Sound far-fetched? Lynn Davis, a former nuclear-policy planner in the Defense Department, has warned of just such a scenario. "Circumstances could certainly arise in which President George Bush might view nuclear weapons as militarily useful in defeating Iraq or, more emotionally, as a way of saving American lives," she wrote in November. The United States certainly has the weaponry available. By Jan. 15, the flotilla confronting Iraq will carry almost 100 nuclear-armed cruise missiles, says respected nuclear-data analyst William Arkin and his team at Greenpeace. ...
  • A Second Look At An Air War

    Last September the Air Force chief of staff, Gen. Michael J. Dugan, declared that air power was the "answer" to defeating Iraq. A bloody land war would be too costly. The Air Force could do the job with far fewer casualties. The day after his statement appeared in print, Dugan was fired by Secretary of Defense Dick Cheney. ...
  • How Much Is Enough?

    For nearly three months now, American military power has poured into the Persian Gulf, at a speed outstripping the U.S. buildup in Vietnam a generation ago. But last week the Pentagon announced, in effect, that it wasn't enough. Secretary of Defense Dick Cheney said much more muscle was needed "to deal with any contingency," which included the possibility of offensive action to drive Iraqi forces out of Kuwait. The plan was to send the equivalent of at least two more mechanized divisions to join the 210,000 Americans already stationed in the desert or at sea. In all, Cheney said, the reinforcements might amount to as many as 100,000 troops, some of them drawn from U.S. garrisons in Western Europe. It will take at least another month to get the new units into place, which suggests that a military showdown with Iraq may not come until the turn of the year--if it happens at all. ...
  • Behind The Boasting

    Mikhail Gorbachev needed a victory--and the Bush administration was determined he should have one. In a ceremonial flurry last week, Gorbachev and George Bush approved a series of agreements designed to make the Soviet leader look like a winner in arms control. They pointed to progress on the eight-year quest for a treaty reducing the two sides' strategic nuclear arsenals. They signed an agreement to destroy huge stockpiles of chemical weapons. And in business left over from the days of Brezhnev and Ford, they wrapped up details for on-site inspection of nuclear testing. Altogether, proclaimed Secretary of State James Baker, the accords helped move the superpowers from the "balance of terror" to "the steadier ground of balance of interests." But the movement was less than met the eye. ...

Pages