Karen Springen

Stories by Karen Springen

  • Leisure: Safe On Your Skis

    This year about 10 million Americans will hit the slopes to ski and snowboard. One out of 250 will also hit the ground--or a tree--and go home injured. We asked the pros for some advice on how to stay safe. (See www.apta.org or nsaa.org for more info.) First, remember: it's your head, so wear that helmet. Snowboarders often fall backward onto their wrists, while skiers are more prone to hurting their knees. Make sure you're properly padded. Even in the cold, you can get burned from too much sun, so goggles and suntan lotion are a must. Finally, ask an expert to double-check your ski bindings. If they're too tight, they might not release properly in a fall. "Your knee is going one way, but the ski is still attached," says Debbie Cyphers, a member of the National Ski Patrol.
  • Batteries Included

    For years, entrepreneur Howard Gould took a Lincoln Town Car to his office from his home on Manhattan's Upper West Side. But those gas-guzzling days are over. Today, he dials OZOcar, New York's first all-hybrid car service. Then he settles into a 52mpg silver Prius--outfitted with leather seats, Wi-Fi, an Apple iBook and Sirius satellite radio.Since OZOcar opened its car doors in September, founders Jordan Harris and Roo Rogers have signed on blue-chip clients like Lehman Brothers and Goldman Sachs. By the year-end, they plan to more than double their 72-vehicle fleet and expand to London, Chicago, Madrid and Frankfurt.Rides cost about the same as traditional black-car services--a good deal for the company since the retail price of a Prius is about half that of a Town Car. Passengers may feel a bit cramped and there's not much room for luggage, so for $20 extra, OZOcar now offers hybrid SUVs. But for most customers, being "eco-chic" is comforting enough.
  • Books: Required Reading

    To celebrate black History Month, share one of these books with your kids. "I Lost My Tooth in Africa," by Penda Diakite ($16.99; ages 4 to 8), was written by a 12-year-old girl about her sister, who wants to lose her tooth on a family trip to Mali. "The Champ: The Story of Muhammad Ali," by Tonya Bolden ($17.95; ages 5 to 8), retells the tale of the boxing legend. "My Brother Martin: A Sister Remembers Growing Up With the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.," by Christine King Farris ($6.99; ages 4 to 8), was written by King's sister about their childhood experiences with segregation.
  • Truly American Dance

    Fifty years ago, Robert Joffrey and Gerald Arpino started the Joffrey Ballet with six dancers, a borrowed station wagon and a U-Haul. Though Joffrey himself is no longer alive, Arpino, now 83, and the company's 47 dancers are celebrating their half century of performances with productions like John Cranko's "Romeo and Juliet" (opening Feb. 15). Featured in Robert Altman's movie "The Company," the Joffrey is mentioned in the same breath as the New York City Ballet and the American Ballet Theatre. It jumpstarted choreographer Twyla Tharp's career--and its dance corps featured stars-in-the-making like Alvin Ailey. Eleven years ago, the Joffrey moved from New York to Chicago. Karen Springen peeked in at "Romeo and Juliet" rehearsals at the Joffrey's studio--and chatted with Arpino and executive director Jon Teeuwissen, who is widely credited with the company's financial turnaround. Excerpts:NEWSWEEK: When you cofounded the Joffrey a half century ago, did you ever expect you'd get to...
  • Health: Weightwatcher

    Should you take the weight-loss drug orlistat? It's already available by prescription, and last week a government advisory panel recommended that the FDA approve the drug for over-the-counter use. That could happen as early as next fall. The pill (sold by Roche under the brand name Xenical) blocks up to a third of fat intake and is usually taken with every meal. In test trials, obese people who took the drug lost about six pounds more than those who didn't. ...
  • A Series of Extraordinarily Fortunate Events

    In her bedroom bookshelf, Isidora Coric, 8, keeps more than two dozen "Magic Tree House" books lined up numerically. She reads the tales in order, too. "She will not skip," says her mom, Valeria Coric. When Isidora visits the bookstore near her home in Lincolnshire, Ill., she always checks for new additions. She's about to be in luck: Random House is printing 300,000 copies of "Night of the New Magicians," the 35th installment in Mary Pope Osborne's wildly popular series about a boy, Jack, and his sister, Annie, who travel to different times in history. If she can't wait until the pub date in March, she and other "Magic Tree House" fans can always scoop up "Pompeii: Lost and Found," an Osborne-written picture book that's out this week.Today children's series are more popular than ever with kids--and therefore with publishers. After all, if kids get hooked on characters like Jack and Annie--or Harry, Ron and Hermione--they're sure to buy the sequel, and the sequel to the sequel and ....
  • Hybrids: Taken for an Enviro-Friendly Ride

    King County, which encompasses Seattle, has a bus fleet of 1,400. Only 236 are hybrids, but fleet manager Jim Boon anticipates that number will multiply: "Having the stored energy in the batteries gives us much better fuel economy."Seattle's taking on enviro-friendly causes is no shocker. But other cities are, too--with prodding from officials who want to decrease emissions and noise and save money on fuel. Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley has proposed an ordinance requiring any fleet owner with 50 or more medallions to have at least one hybrid or alternative-fuel vehicle by June 2007. "Mayor Daley's goal is to have the greenest city in America," says Norma Reyes, commissioner of the Department of Consumer Services, which oversees taxis. In New York City, lawmakers should vote soon on whether to turn all cabs into hybrids in the next half decade.Hybridization could take time: taxi operators typically run cabs for five years, and transit systems run buses for 12 to 18. Hybrid models...
  • The Ultimate Transplant

    For thousands of people whose faces have been disfigured by third-degree burns or other injury, life often becomes an endless series of painful operations. Surgery is performed to transfer skin to the face from the back, buttocks, thighs or even scalp; to improve breathing; to enable patients to open and close their eyes; to restore facial expression. A few patients have had as many as 120 operations. "It's a roller coaster. You're healing well, and then you have to go in for another surgery," says Amy Acton, executive director of the Phoenix Society for Burn Survivors.Now burn victims can consider another option: a face transplant. Last week French doctors performed the first partial procedure when they gave a brain-dead patient's mouth, nose and chin to a 38-year-old woman mauled by a dog. In the United States, doctors at the Cleveland Clinic, whose institutional review board last year approved the experimental treatment, are interviewing potential patients who would receive...
  • A Teen Health Gap

    Think about your pediatrician's office. Chances are that "Winnie-the-Pooh" or "Sesame Street" murals decorate the walls and restless toddlers pass the time before their appointments by playing on the floor with brightly colored toys. Now imagine you're a 16-year-old girl waiting for your checkup in this same room. How comfortable would you feel? How likely would you be to tell the doctor who has treated you since you were in diapers that you're thinking about sleeping with your boyfriend and you need birth control?...
  • Health: Beating The Blues

    Can't seem to get into the holiday spirit? Here are some tips for avoiding seasonal depression. ...
  • Schools: Burger With a Side of Cool

    The hottest lunch hangout at Sterling High in Sterling, Ill., is U.B.U. lounge. On school days, it's mobbed with teens who order chicken wraps and fruit smoothies. When they're not lolling on designer furniture, the lounge's customers are singing along to the likes of Beyonce or Gwen Stefani, whose songs are piped in for the lunch hour. Students love the place, but principal Jerry Binder is its biggest fan: U.B.U. is the school's new jazzed-up cafeteria. "It's just more attractive, so kids want to stay for lunch," says Binder. Sterling is one of 130 schools trying out U.B.U., which was launched by food-service provider Aramark as a way of boosting sales and luring kids away from fast-food stores. This fall, sales of meals at Springfield, Mo.'s Glendale High School, a U.B.U. pilot school, are up 40 percent. Aramark's planning on taking U.B.U. to all of its 420 school districts. But lounges aren't likely to appear in all of the nation's 28,000 high schools. Michael Carr of the...
  • Liposuction: Going Micro

    Brandy Montoya, 28, eats healthy and visits the gym at least three times a week. But as hard as she tried, she could not get the bottom half of her body to match her smaller torso. So in July, she signed up for $9,000 worth of liposuction. Denver plastic surgeon John Millard performed a new procedure, LipoSelection, which uses ultrasound to liquefy fat before it's suctioned out of the body, often resulting in less bruising. Montoya said goodbye to millions of fat cells on her thighs, her hips--and even the inner part of her knees. "I look like somebody you'd be jealous of, I really do," she says.Liposuction has long been the nation's top plastic-surgery procedure. But with advances like LipoSelection, which promises a quicker recovery, and the use of tiny suction tubes ("canulas") that allow doctors to target smaller body parts, it's growing faster than ever. Lipoplasties were up 24 percent last year over 2003, to 478,251.The newest lipo converts aren't settling just for having...
  • Health: Sweeter Dreams

    Most kids need at least 10 hours of sleep. But if your child isn't getting enough, should you turn to sleeping pills? Many parents do. Last week Medco Health Solutions, a managed-care company, released an analysis that showed sleeping-pill usage has increased 85 percent among kids 10 to 19 in the last five years. Before you consider a prescription, doctors say parents should try safer alternatives. At bedtime, calm your kid down by "getting the electronics out of the bedroom," says psychologist Jodi Mindell, coauthor of "Take Charge of Your Child's Sleep." That includes TV, videogames and instant messaging--and ease up on caffeinated beverages like soda, too. Instead, consider a warm, relaxing bath and a story. (A 2004 National Sleep Foundation poll showed that reading helped kids nod off.) Finally, stick to a regular (early!) bedtime. For more info, see sleepfoundation.org and nhlbi.nih.gov/health/public/sleep/starslp/ . Sleep tight.
  • Health: Less Pain In The E.R.

    When it comes to emergency rooms, children are less likely than adults to receive appropriate pain medication, report several recent studies. "One of the great myths that float around is that children don't feel pain," says Dr. Alfred Sacchetti, a member of the American College of Emergency Physicians' pediatrics committee. Here are some steps parents can take to make their kids' visits less traumatic:At check-in, ask whether your child should receive an analgesic so it can start to take effect, suggests Dr. Robert Kennedy of St. Louis Children's Hospital.Stay with children as long as possible to comfort and distract them. Dr. David Schonfeld of Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center says to cuddle your kids, blow bubbles or play music.Avoid lying. Don't say, "It's just like a mosquito bite," if the child needs 12 stitches, says Stanford University's Dr. Bernard Dannenberg. And keep in mind that not all injuries require pain medication: with a dislocated finger or elbow, it's...
  • Cosmetic Surgery: And in This Hand...

    People always told Jill Mattek, 55, that she looked a good decade younger. After all, the Vero Beach, Fla., spa owner works out regularly and uses Botox, sunscreen and Retin-A creams on her face. But Mattek didn't think her hands, with their lumpy veins, matched the rest of her body. "The hands were the giveaway," she says. So she had vascular surgeon Asad R. Shamma perform a laser treatment to eliminate the lumps.Having turned back the clock on their faces, baby-boomer women are now tackling their hands. Plastic-surgery associations don't yet track exactly how many patients undergo these cosmetic procedures, but Houston dermatologist Marjory Nigro says, "Five years ago, nobody would ask you about hands. Now they say, 'Look at my veins. Look at my brown spots'." Robert Weiss, an associate professor of dermatology at Johns Hopkins, says he had treated the ropy-looking veins of five to 10 patients annually as of two years ago; this year he expects to work on hundreds.Shamma's...
  • DESIGNING HEART-HEALTHY COMMUNITIES

    Forecasting heart disease is becoming an ever-finer art, as researchers learn more about the risk factors. But here's a predictor you may not have heard about: street address. In a study published last year, scientists at the RAND Corp. scored 38 metropolitan areas on the "sprawl index"--basically a measure of their dependence on cars. When the researchers tallied disease rates for the same areas, an interesting pattern emerged. Other risk factors aside, people in densely populated places graced with sidewalks and shops had the lowest rates of diabetes, hypertension, heart disease and stroke. And the rates rose steadily as communities became more spread-out and less walkable. Statistically, a person living in Boston or San Francisco was healthier than an identical person in Atlanta or San Bernardino. Without even trying, the folks in those more-compact communities were apparently exercising enough to ward off chronic illness. As the RAND team deduced, "suburban design may be an...
  • Technology

    By Kay ItoiAre you lonely? do you have trouble getting up on time? If you live in Japan, help is on the way. Starting this week, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries will begin taking orders for Wakamaru, the world's first communicative home-use robot. Those willing to shell out $14,300 will get a one-meter-tall bright yellow companion who will follow them around, keep them on schedule, chatter idly and even worry if they get stuck in traffic.Life with Wakamaru will be a lot like having a precocious child who likes to house-sit and never throws tantrums. In the morning, the robot will come to your bed to wake you at a preprogrammed hour. While you dress, he'll recite the day's headlines and advise if you should take an umbrella. He moves about smoothly on a wheeled pedestal, and will even see you off at the door.Wakamaru's oversize round eyes and childlike gestures are what first attract people, says Junji Suzuki, a Mitsubishi Heavy manager. The robot can recognize up to 10,000 words--and...
  • Packing: Lighten Up Your Load

    Your bags are locked, the taxi's honking, but your 3-year-old won't leave home without her entire Barbie collection. To avoid this kind of glitch, Laurel Smith, founder of the kids' travel site momsminivan.com, asks her kids, 6, 9 and 11, to do their own packing. They lay out a complete outfit for each day of the trip--plus two extra pairs of underwear. She checks their work, and makes suggestions like "We're going to Arizona. I'm not sure you really need the snowsuit." Her kids also load their own small backpacks with dolls, books and art supplies. The kids carry these bags themselves, which discourages overpacking.You need to be willing to let them make some mistakes, but not big ones. If you kid "is so fixed on bringing four of his big bears that there just isn't going to be room for his swimming trunks," stash the overflow in your own suitcase, says child psychiatrist Elizabeth Berger. After all, the ultimate goal is to have a great vacation.
  • Photos: Fake Sweat Included

    Cindy Glover, 41, remembers her high-school yearbook photos: "All the girls wore wool blazers." But for her son, Austin, 17, a senior from Spencer, Iowa--and many of his peers nationwide--it's another story. Photographer Rick Krebsbach spent four hours shooting Austin indoors, outdoors, in his wrestling gear and shirtless while holding his football helmet. For the athletic shots, Krebsbach even "put water on him to make him look like he was dripping [sweat]," says Glover. She expects to spend about $700 on the photos and "image collection" book.Gone are the days of poorly lit "mug shots" in powder-blue tuxes. Today, high schoolers are opting for fashion-model-style photos. "I've had a kid bring swords in," says Krebsbach. "You name it: horses, a semi [tractor]. If you can think of it, they've brought it in." While many schools still require formal shots, students exchange customized photos and use them in special senior pages.Photographer Larry Peters shoots seniors on sets at his...
  • HEALTH: WHEN PLUMP IS PRETTY

    Women who want fuller cheeks and softer lines between their noses and lips have a new tool at their disposal. Sculptra, a cosmetic "volumizer" approved last year for facial-skin atrophy in HIV patients, stimulates the growth of collagen and reduces sagging and wrinkling. Dermatologists and cosmetic surgeons are using it off-label on patients who don't have HIV. Sculptra's main advantage is that it lasts longer than Restylane, the No. 1 cosmetic "filler": two years, compared with six to nine months. But, unlike collagen shots, Sculptra can't be used to plump lips. Complications are rare but can include allergies and infection. And the results are subtle. "It is not 'The Picture of Dorian Gray'," says Dr. Paula Moynahan of New York's skinklinic. Patients typically need one to three sessions-- with treatments starting at about $500. See sculptra.com for info.
  • FAMILY: ETHICS, PASS IT ON

    It's always nice when Uncle Charlie leaves you a fat inheritance. But a growing number of people are handing down something extra: an ethical will. The document, which can be a simple one-page sheet or an elaborate write-up with an accompanying video, spells out their beliefs and wishes for family and friends. Someone might, for example, say he hopes his children will continue their religious traditions and spend more time with their own offspring. It's a way to "bequeath your values," not just your valuables, says Dr. Barry Baines, author of "Ethical Wills: Putting Your Values on Paper," who recommends that everyone keep a legal will, a living will (which spells out your end-of-life care preferences) and an ethical will.Start by reading free samples at sites like ethicalwill.com. You can also contact a member of the Association of Personal Historians (personalhistorians.org), who will help you through the process (a simple will starts at $200 to $500). There's no need to wait until...
  • Being the Boss

    Three months ago, college student Megan Dougherty, 20, quit a waitressing job where she felt under-appreciated and unhappy with the "insane" turnover. She moved on to Nick's Pizza & Pub in Crystal Lake, Ill. after hearing great things about the place from another server. "[At Nick's] everyone I met was like, 'I've been here four or seven years. I was like: What!'" she says. Dougherty likes the philosophy at Nick's, including its "grandma test." "If you're picking up your pizza, look at it and make sure it's good enough to serve your grandma," she explains. The emphasis on service is reflected in generous tips, which Dougherty says are twice what she got at her old gig. She also appreciates her un-bossy bosses. "[Owner] Nick [Sarillo] comes and if we're busy, he'll help out," she says. "I see him running food and busing tables. The manager in my other job, if I dared ask anyone for help, he would re-evaluate why was I there."Small wonder that at the beginning of the summer, 50...
  • Breaking the Rules

    Joffrey Ballet dancers typically wear tights, tutus and pointe shoes. But on a Chicago stage next week, they will be dressed in sweatshirts and sneakers for a sultry pas de deux by "West Side Story" choreographer Jerome Robbins. You'd be forgiven for assuming that the street clothes are beneath ballet dancers. Far from it: along with 14 other dance companies from around the world, the Joffrey will perform at the Jazz Dance World Congress Aug. 3-6.Look for dancers donning sneakers, jazz shoes, even nothing at all on their feet, as 800 students and performers spend the days taking classes and their nights watching a choreography competition and performances by different companies. Masashi Action Machine from Japan will combine jazz with martial arts moves. Other groups will infuse their shows with elements from African tribal dance, hip-hop and tap. "This is really the Christmas for jazz dancers," says Lisa Arnett of Dance Spirit magazine.It's been the case virtually every August...
  • The Magic of Meditation

    At 59, David Lynch is already arguably America's best-known avant-garde filmmaker. His directing career has spanned more than three decades, including films like "Eraserhead" (1978), "Blue Velvet" (1986) and "Mulholland Drive" (2001), as well as the early 1990s TV series "Twin Peaks." But he's hardly resting on his laurels now. Lynch is directing a new movie, "Inland Empire," which stars Laura Dern, Jeremy Irons, Harry Dean Stanton and Justin Theroux. And at his Hollywood home on July 21, the father of three officially launched the David Lynch Foundation for Consciousness-Based Education. His goal: to raise enough money to train any U.S. child who wants to learn how to practice Transcendental Meditation (TM). Lynch talked with NEWSWEEK's Karen Springen about his latest project. Excerpts:NEWSWEEK: I understand your sister introduced you to Transcendental Meditation while you were making "Eraserhead" in the 1970s and you've been practicing it ever since. Why?David Lynch: When you...
  • ADULT: A MORE POSH VIBE

    Adult toys are no longer women's dirty little secret. In the post-"Sex and the City" era, these products have gone mainstream--and upscale. Today 46 percent of U.S. women own vibrators, according to a 2004 study by condom maker Durex. And they no longer need to buy them in seedy sex shops. Instead, they can go to ritzy places like the Rykiel women's boutique at Henri Bendel in Manhattan. Products like her $688 silk whip are "very chic, very humoristic, very cool and never vulgar," says Nathalie Rykiel, Sonia Rykiel's daughter and the brand's artistic director. (One vibrator looks like a lipstick tube, another like a rubber duck.) High-end designers like Shiri Zinn and Mi-Su also offer adult creations that sell for hundreds and even thousands of dollars.At Chicago's G boutique, which advertises on the mainstream Chicago radio station WXRT, products are kept in an antique cabinet, and shopping bags are filled with pink tissue and tied with a big pink bow. Customers are responding....
  • IN THE NEWS: 'E' IS FOR NO EFFECT

    Confused by the recent flurry of vitamin E studies? Last week researchers reported in The Journal of the American Medical Association that vitamin E supplements failed to protect healthy women against heart attacks, stroke or cancer. But, unlike a 2004 paper, it found that the pills did no harm. The JAMA study, funded by the National Institutes of Health, looked at 39,876 healthy women 45 and older who were randomly assigned to receive 600IU of vitamin E every other day (a dose found in many supplements) or a placebo.What should you do? Get your vitamin E from foods like olive oil, nuts and avocados. Not only are they healthier than pills, but they taste a lot better, too.
  • Building A Perfect Pizzeria

    For the past 10 years, Marge and Bob Quinn, both 62, have shared an onion and mushroom pizza (with tomatoes and spinach on his half) every Friday at Nick's Pizza & Pub. Their regular server, Lisa Fisher, knows them so well that she automatically puts in their order when she sees them. The Quinns watched former construction worker Nick Sarillo, now 43, build his first restaurant out of a century-old dairy barn in Crystal Lake, Ill., about an hour northwest of Chicago--and curious, tried it out as soon as it opened. From their first Friday, the Quinns loved the pizza and the ambience. Sarillo himself "comes around and says hello to everybody," says Bob Quinn. "And those young girls who are greeting people are always smiling. You can see that they've been trained to do that. Today that's not normal."Both construction and the restaurant business are in Sarillo's blood. His Italian dad ran a beef stand, a pizzeria and an aluminum siding business. Sarillo enjoyed construction but was ...
  • Dying to be Tan

    At 14, fair-skinned, blue-eyed Charlie Guild got a bad sunburn after she forgot to reapply her sunscreen at a pool party. When she was 16, she mistakenly fried herself on a family Christmas vacation trip to Puerto Vallarta. Charlie was just 25 when she learned she had melanoma. She died from it eight months later. "I never had the faintest idea that literally a burn could cause you to get a fatal disease. It can," says her mom, Valerie Guild, president of the Charlie Guild Melanoma Foundation (charlie.org), a national advocacy group trying to raise awareness about skin cancer prevention and detection through sun-safety education for children and other efforts.Getting tan may not be as harmful as smoking. But unprotected exposure to its ultraviolet rays in the teen years dramatically increases the risk of skin cancer, the most common form of the disease in America today. And doctors are concerned about the rising rates of skin cancer, particularly sunburn-linked malignant melanoma-...
  • INJECTIONS: THE 'YOUTH CORRIDOR' IS THE NEW FOREH

    Botox bestowed furrow-free foreheads on the masses. Last year alone, U.S. doctors performed 2.8 million injections with the wrinkle-smoothing drug. But a growing number of patients are realizing they've got the foreheads of 25-year-olds--and the smile lines and jowls of 45-year-olds. "I noticed that my forehead was looking so perfect, and I needed to match the bottom," says Botox user Jodi Abramowitz, 33, a New York lawyer. So she requested a collagen-tightening laser on her nasolabial folds and jowl area and Restylane, a gel filler, in her cheekbones.She's not the only one. Last year U.S. doctors administered 882,469 injections with synthetic gel fillers (such as Restylane and Hylaform)--up from 116,211 in 2003. Paying attention to the "youth corridor" on the bottom of the face is not as invasive or as pricey as a face-lift. The cost: $350 to $450 every three to six months for Botox in the forehead and at least $500 every six to nine months for fillers between the mouth and nose....
  • IT'S NO LONGER A HOG HEAVEN

    Alejandro Silva has spent 27 years making pork rinds, those love-'em-or-hate-'em snacks made from deep-fried pigskin. During that time he's seen how news events can drive his business, for good and for bad. In the early 1980s, while he was running a pork-rind company in Mexico, the peso was devalued, forcing him to come to the United States. At the end of that decade, sales spiked, driven by the buzz that the first President Bush had brought pork rinds to the White House to replace Ronald Reagan's jelly beans. Then, a few years ago, the dieting craze took hold of his business as millions of Americans went on the high-fat, low-carb Atkins diet. Pork rinds, which are carb-free, are practically the only snack Atkins dieters are allowed to munch on. The result: sales at Silva's Chicago-based company, Evans Food Group, tripled over five years, reaching $96 million in 2004.Alas, then the bust came. Dieters are now moving beyond Atkins. According to NPD Group, 4.5 percent of Americans were...
  • Red and Purple Buying Machine

    Several times a month, Linda Glenn, 57, of Luck, Wis., puts on one of her 97 red hats and heads to high tea, a play or a parade with a few dozen similarly attired women. She is "founding queen mother" of the Rowdy Red Hat Mamas of northern Wisconsin--one of 41,200 chapters of the Red Hat Society, a seven-year-old for-profit group based in Fullerton, Calif. devoted to fun and frivolity for women over 50. Like the nation's 1.5 million or so other "Red Hatters," she wears red hats and purple clothes--the more outrageous, the better. Feather boas and blinky-light finger rings are particularly popular with the Wisconsin chapter's 64 members, ages up to 92.The society dates back to 1997, when founder Sue Ellen Cooper, now 60, gave a friend who was turning 55 a red hat and a copy of the Jenny Joseph poem, "Warning," about an aging woman who wears a red hat and a purple dress. Cooper then gave hats to three other close friends. In 1998, Cooper and these four women wore their red hats with...
  • The Tip Sheet

    Until last month, Lindsay Christiansen, 26, hadn't worn a bathing suit in three years. The San Diego, California-based flight attendant gained weight after college and felt self-conscious about her increasingly dimpled thighs. "It got to the point where I didn't even want to wear shorts," she says. Then Christiansen heard about a new treatment for cellulite that combines intensive massage and cool laser light. She signed up at a local spa and, after just a few weeks, saw a big difference: her legs were slimmer and less rippled. "Every day, people are, like, 'You lost weight, what are you doing?' " she says.Christiansen's treatment, TriActive, is the product of a new wave of research into cellulite. The orange-peel-like skin that forms around the butt and thighs affects 85 percent of all women older than 18. Yet, for a long time, dermatologists had little information about its nature or how to treat it. "Only in the past three years have we really understood what causes it," says Dr....