Karen Springen

Stories by Karen Springen

  • A PEACEFUL ADOLESCENCE

    At 17, Amanda Hund is a straight-A student who loves competing in horse shows. The high school junior from Willmar, Minn., belongs to her school's band, orchestra and choir. She regularly volunteers through her church and recently spent a week working in an orphanage in Jamaica. Usually, however, she's closer to home, where her family eats dinner together every night. She also has a weekly breakfast date with her father, a doctor, at a local coffee shop. Amanda credits her parents for her relatively easy ride through adolescence. "My parents didn't sweat the small stuff," she says. "They were always very open. You could ask any question."Is the Hund family for real? Didn't they get the memo that says teens and their parents are supposed to be at odds until... well, until forever? Actually, they're very much for real, and according to scientists who study the transition to adulthood, they represent the average family's experience more accurately than all those scary TV movies about...
  • A HEAD START ON FITNESS

    Toddlers are by nature active, curious, energetic little people. They love to run, they love to dance, they love to climb. Like the rest of us, however, they live in a world of temptation: fast food, TV, videogames. They need help to keep them healthy and fit.When it comes to eating, toddlers are the kings and queens of pickiness. But that doesn't mean you should give up on peas the first time your 2-year-old spits them out. It can take anywhere from five to 10 attempts before a child accepts a new taste. Be patient. Let kids be grazers, too. Dr. William Sears, father of eight children, recommends that parents fill ice-cube trays or muffin tins with a smorgasbord of nutritious snacks--bananas, avocados, steamed broccoli. Toddlers get to pick and choose, and they're entertained at the same time. Good eating means good drinking, too: water and milk (low-fat or skim after the age of 2) are ideal. Get rid of sodas and cut way back on sugar-sweetened, calorie-rich fruit juices.The...
  • 'Hot Zone II'?

    Since an outbreak of the deadly Marburg virus surfaced in Angola last fall, 215 people have died. The deadly illness--first reported in Marburg, Germany, in 1967--causes high fever, liver and kidney failure and bleeding from the nose, mouth, eyes and rectum, killing nine out of every 10 victims. What threat does the virus pose to Americans and others around the world? NEWSWEEK's Karen Springen asked Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Excerpts:NEWSWEEK: For those who've heard of "The Hot Zone," Richard Preston's true story of a highly infectious, deadly virus from the central African rain forest that suddenly appeared in Washington, D.C., the Marburg virus sounds scary. Could it spread outside Africa?Dr. Anthony Fauci: It is extremely unlikely to cause a public health threat, other than a very isolated case outside of a setting like sub-Saharan Africa, where there's a healthcare delivery issue. It is not easily spread. It...
  • Personalized Health

    While the Terri Schiavo case has dominated the news over the past week, medical ethicists have also been busy considering developments in personalized medicine--customizing health care to fit individual genetic profiles. On Wednesday, the Food and Drug Administration issued guidelines for interpreting "pharmacogenomic" data (see fda.gov). Meanwhile, three months ago, the FDA approved the first laboratory test to help physicians use genetic information to choose the right doses of drugs for patients with cardiac problems, psychiatric diseases and even cancer.To learn more about the implications of our brave new medical world, NEWSWEEK's Karen Springen spoke with Dr. Arthur Caplan, chairman of the department of medical ethics at the University of Pennsylvania and author of "Am I My Brother's Keeper? The Ethical Frontiers of Biomedicine" (Indiana University Press). Excerpts:NEWSWEEK: What's your stance on the Terri Schiavo case?Dr. Arthur Caplan: The right thing to do is to honor...
  • GAME OVER IN COLORADO

    In nearly five years as president of the University of Colorado, Elizabeth Hoffman racked up an impressive list of accomplishments. A skillful fund-raiser, she increased the university's endowment by nearly $100 million and established new technology initiatives. Two faculty members each won a Nobel Prize. But that wasn't enough to overcome what one member of Colorado's board of regents described as the "perfect storm" for a 21st-century university administrator: allegations of sexual assault by football players and recruits, and a showdown over free speech. Last week Hoffman decided that calls for her resignation from politicians and editorial writers made it impossible to lobby the legislature for much-needed money, and she quit. "I do not take this step lightly," she told the regents in her resignation letter. "I love CU. I have given it my heart and soul."Hoffman's exit may seem precipitous, but she lasted at least as long as any of her recent predecessors in Colorado. Around...
  • HEALTH: DON'T PAY TO PLAY

    Young kids are vulnerable to sports injuries that can become chronic later in life. This month the National Athletic Trainers' Association (nata.org) and the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (aaos.org) are kicking off a public-service campaign aimed at keeping sporty kids healthy. Here's more advice for parents:See your physician. A pre-participation exam can screen your child for pre-existing conditions like cardiovascular problems.Avoid heavy weights. Kids are better off with light weights and high repetition.Prevent overuse injuries. Kids can get "Little League elbow" from sidearm throwing and repetitive strain. Limit pitch count to about 60 to 80 a week for younger kids, says University of Mississippi pediatric orthopedic surgeon John Purvis.Stay away from high-injury activities like trampolines, which can be "very dangerous," says Purvis, especially when multiple kids jump at once.Encourage them to play outside. Like cross-training, it tones many muscles at once. Only...
  • HEALTH: MILLION DOLLAR SMILE

    Kendall Ramirez, 34, always felt self-conscious about her teeth, which she thought were too wide and masculine-looking. So before her wedding five years ago, the Dallas marketing consultant splurged on MAC veneers, paying about $15,000 to cover her 10 top front teeth with porcelain. She was so happy with the results that, last year, she went back and had her bottom set bleached. The result: a bright, rounded, more feminine smile. "It was worth every penny," she says.Ramirez is part of a new era in dentistry that goes far beyond fighting cavities. With the vast majority of celebrities sporting blinding-white smiles, and shows like "Extreme Makeover" bringing da Vinci veneers to Everyman, Americans have grown tooth-obsessed. As a result, dentists are performing about twice as many cosmetic procedures as they were just three years ago, estimates Cleveland dentist Matthew Messina, the American Dental Association's consumer adviser. And companies have sprung up to offer special financing...
  • HEALTH: LESS PAIN, ALL GAIN

    About six out of every 10 U.S. women giving birth receive an epidural--a combination of a local anesthetic and a narcotic injected through a catheter inserted in the lower back. Yet traditionally, doctors worried that administering one before the cervix opened four or five centimeters (a process that takes eight to nine hours, on average) would slow labor and increase the risk of C-section. Last week a randomized, controlled study of 750 first-time moms, published in The New England Journal of Medicine, delivered some good news: early epidurals actually shortened average labor time by 90 minutes--and did not increase the incidence of C-section. Why? "Our gut feeling is that somehow the whole process of relaxing and not being in pain actually speeds the process of labor," says Northwestern Memorial Hospital obstetric anesthesiologist Dr. Cynthia Wong, lead author of the study.The American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology currently recommends waiting for the four- to five-...
  • BETA-TESTING PARADISE

    Deep in the back of the 60,000-square-foot appliance store in suburban Chicago, Yamaha representative Chuck Lucous is performing his magic. He's working with a rectangular silver state-of-the-art speaker that's sitting on a special mount beneath a Panasonic plasma TV. He hooks it up to a DVD player, and soon music cascades across one area of this retailing gem called Abt Electronics. The song sounds remarkably rich coming from a single speaker, and that's the point: this $1,299 Yamaha "acoustic sound projector" is intended to replicate the performance of a multispeaker system. Abt became the first store in the United States to sell the speaker earlier this month--but that's hardly unusual. That big-box store in your town is a great place to find merchandise. When it comes to electronics, though, version 1.0 of any new product is likely to show up at Abt first.The theater industry once tried out new plays in New Haven, Conn., before they opened on Broadway. Carmakers routinely unveil...
  • SURGERY: A TAXING PROCEDURE

    Taxing breast implants is the latest tool states are using to augment their revenues. New Jersey pioneered the idea in September, when it became the first state to levy a 6 percent tax on elective cosmetic procedures, such as liposuction and face-lifts. Now similar taxes are up for debate in Washington and Illinois, and other states are said to be considering cosmetic-surgery tax legislation.Botox and breast implants make an easy target for cash-strapped states like Washington, which faces a deficit of roughly $2 billion. After all, the American Society of Plastic Surgeons reports that in 2003, Americans spent $8.4 billion on cosmetic procedures. Doctors and medical groups oppose the taxes, saying they discriminate against women, who made up 86 percent of those getting procedures in 2003. But Washington state Sen. Karen Keiser, who notes that revenues from her state's tax would go to health services for children, says it might even give the industry a lift. "[It's] a little...
  • Broadway in the Loop

    Even with big stars like Tim Curry, David Hyde Pierce and Hank Azaria and a dynamite script by Eric Idle, the producers of the surefire smash "Monty Python's Spamalot" wanted to fine-tune their musical before it hit Broadway. So the Sunday after Thanksgiving, the cast and crew headed to Chicago--where audience laughs (and silences) helped them decide what needed tweaking and even deleting. As a result, when the show started its Broadway previews on Valentine's Day, New York theatergoers were spared its weak moments, including an unfunny witch-burning scene. Instead, they got Chicago-tested winners--including the zingers, "We won't succeed on Broadway if we don't have any Jews" and "There's a very small percentile who enjoys a dancing gentile."Those lines are funny because they're untrue. "The Midwest is really a good barometer for the country," explains producer Mary Lu Roffe. Last month alone, Chicago theatergoers could choose (if they could get tickets) between two pre-Broadway...
  • LIGHT UP AND YOU MAY BE LET GO

    Workers for Weyco, a health-benefits administrator in Okemos, Mich., can now be fired for smoking--on or off the job. The company plans to randomly test workers at least once a year. As a business that pays claims for health plans, "we see some of the devastating effects of smoking-related illnesses," says Gary Climes, vice president of finance. "We're trying to avoid it." So are other corporations. While 28 states have passed smoker-protection laws since 1989, the others never made smokers a protected class. "Smokers have a significant higher percentage of medical complications. They miss more days of work," says Richard Chaifetz, CEO of ComPsych, an employee-behavioral-counseling firm. And even when they're at work, they often structure their day around cigarette breaks. UCLA nursing professor Linda Sarna reports in the journal Research in Nursing & Health that nurses who smoke are perceived by their peers as spending less time with patients. Critics of the nicotine crackdown...
  • THE MISCARRIAGE MAZE

    Jon Cohen and his wife, Shannon, never thought much about fertility. Their first child, Erin, was conceived easily, and Shannon's pregnancy progressed without a hitch. But when the couple decided to try again four years later, when both were 37, they ran into trouble. First they had difficulty conceiving; then Shannon had four consecutive miscarriages. "We felt like failures," says Jon.The experience prompted Jon to delve into the science of miscarriage, which he maps out in his new book, "Coming to Term" (Houghton Mifflin. $24). Despite the guilt and secrecy, miscarriage is far from uncommon. Anywhere from 30 to 50 percent of all pregnancies are lost before women are even aware they've conceived, and at least one in seven known pregnancies ends in miscarriage. Older women are especially vulnerable--as more forty-somethings launch into baby-making, miscarriage could strike in even greater numbers. Researchers will never be able to treat the heartache, but they are beginning to...
  • HEALTH: MED SCHOOL FOR THE MASSES

    Today, says Bruce Fuchs, an immunologist and director of the National Institutes of Health's office of science education, physicians are likely to say, "'Here's a range of treatment options. What do you want to do?' That puts a lot of pressure on an individual." Which may account for why once-a-week, after-work lectures on topics like anatomy, microbiology, infectious disease, cancer and heart disease are now offered at more than 80 U.S. medical institutions. At the Smithsonian this spring, the NIH is holding a "mini med" on aging. And PBS is airing "Mini-Med School TV," with episodes on "Hi-Tech Brain Repair" and "Lifesaving Heart Repair" taught by docs at Chicago's Northwestern Memorial Hospital. Mini med schools' six- to 10-week sessions don't qualify students to do open-heart surgery. But at Washington University in St. Louis, attendees practice suturing on synthetic skin. In PBS's brain-repair episode, Dr. Hunt Batjer, chair of Northwestern's neurological-surgery department,...
  • PUBLISHING: A NEW 'INSPIRATION'

    With a nod to God, next month Simon & Schuster will become the first mainstream publisher to launch its own religion imprint for children. Little Simon Inspirations, the new faith-based line, will go up against Zonderkidz and Tommy Nelson, established Christian publishers that now dominate the thriving religious kid's lit market.Inspirations is an answer to a Christian market that is becoming more mainstream, says Robin Corey, publisher of S&S's novelty, media and teen publishing division. "[The audience for these books] is not what we have always thought of as the traditional Christian market," she says. "It's Joe Everybody. When a tsunami hits, you want to be reassuring to your kids." The new line, which includes 13 titles this year, will skip Bible stories and focus instead on books like Karen Hill's upcoming "Finding the Golden Ruler," which teach Christian values without delving into specific doctrine.Which is not to say that the line lacks church cred--all Little Simon...
  • HEALTH: CARDED FOR DRUGS

    Last week the uninsured caught a small break on the high price of prescription drugs. Ten pharmaceutical companies, including Pfizer and AstraZeneca, unveiled the Together Rx Access card, which will give some 36 million Americans without health coverage the chance to save roughly 25 to 40 percent on select prescriptions, including top sellers Lipitor, Synthroid and Zoloft. With the card, a patient would pay $7.23 for a Viagra tablet instead of about $10. But not everyone qualifies. The program is only for legal U.S. residents who lack public or private prescription-drug coverage, who are ineligible for Medicare and who earn less than $30,000 a year (for a single person) or $60,000 (for a family of four). To apply, call 800-444-4106 or go to togetherrxaccess.com. And to see if you qualify for federal help instead, visit the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services at medicare.gov. If your drug is not on the list, check if its manufacturer is among the handful, like Wyeth (wyeth...
  • ARTFUL AGING

    On his desk at the University of Kentucky, Prof. David Snowdon displays an artistic treasure: a ceramic sculpture of Santa Claus perched atop a John Deere tractor. The artist, Sister Esther Boor, gave it to him before her death in 2002. At 107, she was the oldest participant in the research project Snowdon directs, the university's groundbreaking Nun Study. Since its start in 1986, the program has investigated the relationship between aging and Alzheimer's disease by tracking the health of 678 Roman Catholic nuns over 70. Sister Esther took up ceramics after she retired at 97. Snowdon cherishes her reply on first being asked to join the project: "She said she was too busy to be in a study of old people."Snowdon still isn't sure what kept Sister Esther so vibrant for so many years. But the secret of her kind of sustained creative energy is an increasingly valuable one. People are living longer lives than ever before. What matters now is to make those extra years more fulfilling--and...
  • HEALTH: EARLIER ONSETS

    As the American Academy of Pediatrics enters its 75th year, it can point to huge advances in children's health, such as vaccines for polio, chickenpox and measles. But Junior may be pox-free and have the arteries of a middle-aged man. Today, because of child obesity, doctors are increasingly diagnosing adult diseases in children. "The number of kids we're seeing in our practice with elevated cholesterol or type 2 diabetes has at least tripled in the last five years," says Denver pediatric cardiologist Reginald Washington, co-chairman of the AAP's task force on obesity. In the past 30 years, the percentage of kids who are overweight has quadrupled, to 16 percent. The result is a rise in cholesterol levels, hypertension, type 2 diabetes (in part from exercising too little) and bone and joint problems (from carrying excess weight). This year the AAP plans to introduce pamphlets and a program to help pediatricians counsel families on how to prevent obesity through healthy habits like...
  • HOLIDAYS: ALL LIT UP

    It's the most wonderful time of the year... for department-store displays. TIP SHEET picks some top windows to peer into.Marshall Field's, Chicago. State Street store features an 11-window "Snow White" display--with a three-foot evil queen in leather and velvet.Neiman Marcus, Houston. You don't need a net to catch giant suspended butterflies inspired by Puccini's classic "Madame Butterfly."Macy's Union Square, San Francisco. Three adopt-a-pet windows in this store have already found homes for 100-plus cats and dogs.Saks Fifth Avenue, New York. James Patterson's new story, "SantaKid," comes to life at the Rockefeller Center store (top).Bergdorf Goodman, New York. Couture and costumes deck the fantasy-inspiring displays at this Fifth Avenue luxury store (below).
  • TIP SHEET

    Travel: Getaways with Ganache ...
  • ADS: WHAT'S ON WHEN YOU'RE SNACKING?

    A study in the new issue of the journal Pediatrics says that even during the supposedly kid-friendly pre-9 p.m. time, one in five commercials aired during major sporting events depicted violence or unsafe behavior. For parents, "the take-home message is heightened awareness," says coauthor Robert Tamburro, a pediatrician at Penn State's Hershey Medical Center. To complete the study, pediatricians assessed 1,185 commercials that aired before 9 p.m. on 50 major sports programs during a one-year period--including the '03 Super Bowl. They didn't analyze the actual events, halftimes or pre- and postgame shows. Fourteen percent of the ads showed unsafe behavior (defined as any action that could have harmful consequences or that went against the injury-prevention guidelines of national organizations). Six percent depicted violence. The Super Bowl was the worst offender; a spokesperson for ABC, which broadcast the event, says the network "reviews every spot to ensure that behavior is safe...
  • USING GENES AS MEDICINE

    At 18, Ashanthi DeSilva of suburban Cleveland is a living symbol of one of the great intellectual achievements of the 20th century. Born with an extremely rare and usually fatal disorder that left her without a functioning immune system (the "bubble-boy disease," named after an earlier victim who was kept alive for years in a sterile plastic tent), she was treated beginning in 1990 with a revolutionary new therapy that sought to correct the defect at its very source, in the genes of her white blood cells. It worked. Although her last gene-therapy treatment was in 1992, she is completely healthy with normal immune function, according to one of the doctors who treated her, W. French Anderson of the University of Southern California. Researchers have long dreamed of treating diseases from hemophilia to cancer by replacing mutant genes with normal ones. And the dreaming may continue for decades more. "There will be a gene-based treatment for essentially every disease," Anderson says, ...
  • BOOKS: GETTING RELIGION

    The holidays can prompt kids to ask complex questions about religion. To help answer them, parents can turn to these new, thought-provoking books:Kaddish for Grandpa in Jesus' Name, Amen by James Howe ($16.95; ages 4 to 8).A 5-year-old girl raised by a Christian-born dad and a Jewish mom struggles with her grandfather's death.Ayat Jamilah: Beautiful Signs by Sarah Conover ($19.95; ages 9 to 12).This anthology vividly tells traditional stories from all corners of the Muslim world.Godless by Pete Hautman ($15.95; young adult).A rebellious 15-year-old starts his own church. This National Book Award winner can prompt a discussion on the meaning of faith.Walking the Bible by Bruce Feiler ($16.99; ages 7 and up).A kids' version of the 2001 best seller, it takes readers on Feiler's 10,000-mile trek to Biblical sites like Jerusalem, the Euphrates River and Mount Sinai.
  • COLLEGE MAJOR: WORKOUT

    Talk about sweating your courseload: Purdue University, in West Lafayette, Ind., will become the first college nationwide to offer a four-year degree with a concentration in personal-fitness training. Next fall undergrads will start the program, which will include stints in commercial health clubs and cardiac rehab sites. It should be popular: about 70 percent of Purdue's health and fitness majors say personal-fitness training is their career goal--no doubt partly because the median pay of $25 an hour is more lucrative than other fitness positions. And there should be jobs. Employment of recreation and fitness workers is expected to grow as much as 35 percent by 2012, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Consumers will also benefit: these new trainers should be able to pass the American College of Sports Medicine's new personal-trainer exam, an attempt to help the industry and clients identify who's competent. Purdue's program helps legitimize personal training, says Mike...
  • HIGHER ED: MAKING THE GRADE?

    For the first time in more than three decades, foreign enrollment in U.S. higher-ed institutions decreased last year, according to Open Doors 2004, an annual report just released by the Institute of International Education. The study blames the 2.4 percent drop (nearly 5 percent for undergrads) on problems getting visas, rising tuition, stronger recruitment by foreign universities and perceptions that international students may not be welcome. Some also blame the "Vietnam factor." (The last real enrollment drop was in 1971-72, when young people were still disillusioned with U.S. involvement in Vietnam.) "Rightly or wrongly, they perceive the United States as unilateral and not sensitive," says American Council on Education president David Ward. "Then it may not matter how well we've got the visa process improved."The stakes are high for U.S. schools. International students bring more than $13 billion to the economy, according to the U.S. Commerce Department. They also tend to pay...
  • IN THE NEWS: GO EASY ON THE 'E'

    To reduce your risk of heart disease, exercise, eat right and stop smoking--but think twice before taking high-dose vitamin E supplements. Last week researchers reported at an American Heart Association meeting and online in the Annals of Internal Medicine (annals.org) that supplements of the popular antioxidant were associated with a higher risk of death. "If your doctor tells you to take vitamin E, say, 'What is the evidence for it?'" says Johns Hopkins University researcher Edgar Miller, lead author of the study. Researchers, who analyzed 19 previous studies involving 135,967 people who took extra vitamin E alone or with other vitamins, found that participants who took at least 400 international units per day (the amount in most supplements) were 5 percent more likely to die than people who took placebos--possibly because, at high doses, the vitamin may interfere with clotting. Standard multivitamins contain 30 to 45IU of vitamin E, an amount that the study found may be...
  • HEALTH: LEAF BEHIND THE SUFFERING

    A football injury makes a better story, but raking leaves could be the sport that sidelines you this fall. To avoid injuries, follow these tips from the National Athletic Trainers' Association (nata.org). Dress in layers that you can shed as you work up a sweat, with gloves to prevent blisters--and, in some regions, snakebites. If your back has been injured before, wear a simple brace (available for about $20; ask the pharmacist for fitting details). Stretch your shoulders before you hit the yard, drink plenty of water to avoid dehydration and start slow. Rake strokes that are short and steady are the best, so that you don't overextend yourself and pull a muscle. Don't overstuff trash bags, either. Move the bags around in a wheelbarrow--and if you get tired, recruit the kids to lend a hand. But make sure you bend your knees and lift with your legs, not your back, while you load the bags in. Because "repetitive activity creates soreness," says Marjorie Albohm, a certified athletic...
  • HEALTH: KIDS UNDER THE KNIFE

    Ruby Juarez grew up feeling self-conscious about what she calls her "superbig" nose. When talking to friends, she often covered part of her face out of embarrassment. Classmates took to calling her "Shrek nose." For her 17th birthday, Juarez's father finally agreed to pay for a rhinoplasty, which Beverly Hills cosmetic surgeon Robert Kotler performed last June. Now fully healed, Juarez no longer gets teased. "I look normal now," she says. Her advice: "Get whatever your flaws are fixed, because it's really worth it."To most parents, that must sound like a terrifying prospect. But more teenagers like Juarez are asking for--and getting--cosmetic procedures. Last year doctors performed 331,886 of them on Americans 18 and younger--a 48 percent jump over the previous year, reports the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS). The increase comes partly from the popularity of TV shows like "Extreme Makeover" and "The Swan," which have captured the imaginations of younger and older...
  • THE ECONOMICS OF THE FLU

    Shortages of flu vaccine are nothing new in America, but this year's is a whopper. Until last week, it appeared that 100 million Americans would have access to flu shots this fall. Then British authorities, concerned about quality-control problems at a production plant in Liverpool, barred all further shipments by the Chiron Corp. Overnight, the U.S. vaccine supply dwindled by nearly half--and federal health officials found themselves making an unusual plea. Instead of beseeching us all to get vaccinated, they're now urging most healthy people between the ages of 2 and 64 not to. "This re-emphasizes the fragility of our vaccine supply," says Dr. Martin Myers of the National Network for Immunization Information, "and the lack of redundancy in our system."Why is such a basic health service so easily knocked out? Mainly because private companies have had little incentive to pursue it. To create a single dose of flu vaccine, a manufacturer has to grow live virus in a 2-week-old...
  • HEALTH: IT'S OVER YOUR HEAD

    An estimated 150,000 kids suffer a sports-related concussion each year. With soccer and football season in full swing, here's what you can do to help your son or daughter stay safe:Get the right equipment. Last year U.S. Soccer and the National Association of High Schools allowed soccer players to wear head protection for the first time. But many doctors want to see more proof that head guards work. "It may create a false sense of security," says Kevin Guskiewicz, director of the Sports Medicine Research Laboratory at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and lead author of a position statement on managing sports-related concussions in the current issue of the Journal of Athletic Training (nata.org). Kids may be better off with a simple mouth guard.Strengthen neck muscles and boost technique. If your child uses weight training and resistance training to strengthen his shoulders, upper back and neck, he's less likely to suffer a concussion, says Eric Small, chair of the...