Karen Springen

Stories by Karen Springen

  • IN THE NEWS: INSTANT RECALL

    Last week Merck pulled its blockbuster arthritis-and-pain-relief drug Vioxx from the market. This week the 1.27 million Americans who were taking it are wondering what to do.Don't panic. Though a three-year study found that patients who had been taking Vioxx for more than 18 months increased their risk of heart attack and stroke, the overall incidence was small. "The risk to any one patient was very low," says Dartmouth's Dr. John Baron, chair of the study's steering committee.Stop taking Vioxx, but hold on to your bottle. Merck plans to reimburse you for unused tablets. See vioxx.com or call 888-368-4699.Call your doctor. Your physician might prescribe Pfizer's Celebrex, which, like Vioxx, is a cox-2 inhibitor. Some doctors worry that the entire class of drugs may cause problems, but Pfizer says Celebrex has shown no increased cardiovascular or stroke risk in long-term studies. Your other options may include ibuprofen or naproxen, which increase the risk of ulcers and...
  • HEALTH: DON'T CALL ME 'FOUR EYES'

    Earlier this year Shaina Borowicz, 13, switched from glasses to colored contacts. "I don't think I look good in glasses," she says. Naturally brown-eyed, Borowicz (right) each day chooses from her collection of five colors: two shades of blue, two shades of green and honey. When she wears her favorites, Acuvue's Sapphire Blue, girls--and guys--tell her, "I love your eyes." And at her private school, where kids are required to wear khakis and polo shirts, colored eyes are a permissible fashion statement.No self-conscious child wants to hide behind a pair of Coke-bottle glasses. With advances in contact-lens technology, fewer have to. Half of the 13- to 17-year-olds who need vision correction wear contacts, up from one quarter 10 years ago. And the trend isn't limited to older teens. Thirteen percent of vision-corrected kids under 13 now wear contacts, says Peter J. Valenti, vice president of marketing for Johnson & Johnson Vision Care, maker of Acuvue.How do you decide if they're...
  • Breast Cancer: A Ribbon's Far Reach

    The pink parade starts again in October, the 20th annual Breast Cancer Awareness Month. In Times Square, 3M is building the World's Largest Pink Ribbon using Post-it notes with a ribbon imprint. There's ChapStick in pink packages, Avon's breast-cancer celebrity-nailwear campaign, KitchenAid's "Cook for the Cure" effort, not to mention pink and white M&M's, pink-ribbon silk scarves, socks, stuffed bears--and so on. While these companies do donate portions of the proceeds to research, some activists aren't thrilled with the pink-ribbon proliferation. This week the not-for-profit group Breast Cancer Action, which urges women to ask about where the money spent on pink products goes, launches its annual "Think Before You Pink" campaign. Author Barbara Ehrenreich, treated for breast cancer three years ago, says her involvement with BCA stems from her dislike of "this creepy culture" around breast cancer. "It's given this feel-good aura," she says. "There's an effort to make it seem...
  • CRISCO: A WHOLE NEW CAN

    Is nothing sacred? Crisco, the shortening used to bake flaky pie crusts and fry crispy chicken, is now available in a trans-fat-free version. The rollout has hit about 40 percent of the country and comes as pressure mounts on food companies to remove the cholesterol-raising fats before they have to be listed on labels in 2006. The new Crisco tub is green and white, since market research shows that the public sees green as a healthy color. Instead of using partially hydrogenated soybean and cottonseed oils (the ingredients in the regular version, which--deep breaths--is still on sale), Smucker, which makes the shortening, combined sunflower oil, soybean oil and fully hydrogenated cottonseed oil. And it eliminated all but trace amounts of trans fats without increasing the saturated fats. Crisco diehards--who love its lack of flavor--will try the new version, even though a one-pound tub will cost $2.29, 40 cents more. Bud (The Pie Man) Royers, founder of Royers Round Top Cafe in Texas,...
  • THE SERENITY WORKOUT

    It's now clear that emotions can affect our physical health, but what about the reverse? Can physical activity affect the health of our minds? Hippocrates thought so. He advised melancholy Greeks to get out and walk, and modern science suggests he was on to something. In fact, getting off the couch may help some people as much as Prozac or psychotherapy. "Exercise can improve anyone's mood and mental performance," says Carl Cotman, director of the Institute for Brain Aging and Dementia at the University of California, Irvine. "It's free, it's fun and it doesn't take a whole lot of time."Whether they survey children or adults, researchers find that active people are happier than sofa jockeys, and less prone to depression and suicide. That doesn't prove that exercise makes people happy (it could be that happiness makes people exercise), but studies are now confirming the therapeutic effects. When Duke University psychologist James Blumenthal placed depressed patients on a supervised...
  • Fashion Week: Coming To A City Near You

    Don't expect to see Gwyneth Paltrow or Anna Wintour in the front row. But next week, after the New York fashionistas have gone back to their desks and their skinny lattes, Chicago--a city in which the only "must have" accessory is a good, warm muffler--will launch its first fashion week. Produced by the Midwestern retail giant Marshall Field's, the Chicago event follows on the stilettos of new fashion weeks in other locales not instantly identified with haute couture. In the past decade fashion weeks have cropped up in Kenya, India, Brazil, Iceland, New Zealand and Australia, as well as in Hong Kong, Tokyo, Toronto, Miami, San Francisco (left) and Los Angeles. The Chicago shows aim to lure shoppers by featuring clothes available right now. "The Midwest has that practical sensibility," explains JoAnn Young, Marshall Field's executive fashion producer, who is launching simultaneous fashion weeks in Detroit and Minneapolis. Will this proliferation undermine the cachet of the New York,...
  • The Serenity Workout

    It's now clear that emotions can affect our physical health, but what about the reverse? Can physical activity affect the health of our minds? Hippocrates thought so. He advised melancholy Greeks to get out and walk, and modern science suggests he was on to something. In fact, getting off the couch may help some people as much as Prozac or psychotherapy. "Exercise can improve anyone's mood and mental performance," says Carl Cotman, director of the Institute for Brain Aging and Dementia at the University of California, Irvine. "It's free, it's fun and it doesn't take a whole lot of time."Whether they survey children or adults, researchers find that active people are happier than sofa jockeys, and less prone to depression and suicide. That doesn't prove that exercise makes people happy (it could be that happiness makes people exercise), but studies are now confirming the therapeutic effects. When Duke University psychologist James Blumenthal placed depressed patients on a supervised...
  • PACK LOVE AND FOOD

    Remember trying to trade the apple in your lunchbox for a Twinkie? Here's how to pack healthy fare so fun and tasty that your kids will want to eat it:Make fruits and veggies enticing. Get your kids to grow their own, even if it's just in a windowsill planter. Or take them to the produce aisle to choose their favorites. Dice up kiwi, peaches and strawberries to make a colorful fruit salad. Include baby carrots, perhaps with low-fat dip. (Consider using an ice pack.)Opt for fresher, less-processed foods. Last month a USDA committee on the food pyramid recommended avoiding trans fats. They're found in many store-bought cookies and crackers and even peanut butter. Try making PB&J with natural peanut butter. (Smucker's makes a yummy variety.)Switch to whole-wheat bread. Try out calcium-rich string cheese in a whole-wheat tortilla wrap or a stuffed whole-wheat pita, advises the American Dietetic Association (see eatright.org). But don't be a puritan. It's OK to throw in a chocolate...
  • FAMILY: SKIP THE SUBURBS

    Growing up in a big city, Junior may not learn to ride a two-wheeler in the middle of the street. But there's plenty he can do. In "The City Parent Handbook: The Complete Guide to the Ups and Downs and Ins and Outs of Raising Young Kids in the City," authors Kathy Bishop and Julia Whitehead (both New Yorkers) give tips on raising happy, healthy urban children.Prepare a medical-emergency list of favorite hospitals and specialists, which you should keep by the phone, leave with babysitters and give to schools. Not all emergency rooms are equal in big cities.Buy family memberships to museums so you can visit often, and keep each outing short.Make friends in different parts of the city. "If your child takes swimming classes at the Y, stop at the diner there and get to know them," says Bishop.Choose a pet wisely. A fancy rat is an excellent small, kid-friendly choice, says Bishop.
  • ANXIETY: SWEET, ELUSIVE SLEEP

    Earlier this summer, Mike Trevino, 29, slept nine hours in nine days in his quest to win a 3,000-mile, cross-country bike race. For the first 38 hours and 646 miles, he skipped sleep entirely. Later he napped--with no dreams he can remember--for no more than 90 minutes a night. Soon he began to imagine that his support crew was part of a bomb plot. "It was almost like riding in a movie. I thought it was a complex dream, even though I was conscious," says Trevino, who finished second.Trevino's case may be extreme, but it raises important questions: If we don't sleep (or sleep enough), what happens to our dreams? And if we don't dream, what happens to us? These are not purely academic or existential questions. Nearly 40 percent of Americans report getting fewer than seven hours sleep on weekdays and nearly 60 percent say they experience some kind of insomnia at least several nights a week, according to a National Sleep Foundation poll. "Sleep may be essential for life," says Jerry...
  • JUST VISITING

    Rudy Yogiaman considers himself lucky to be a sophomore at USC. As a citizen of predominantly Muslim Indonesia, he got a visa at a time when many of his friends were being turned down. Others decided not to apply, figuring their chances were too slim, and opted for Australia instead. "I would rather choose America," he says. "It's still worth the hassle. Australia doesn't have any famous schools."Yes, foreign students have to be more determined than ever. They need to allow more time for the vetting of their visa requests, and rejections are more common than before. But no, the number of foreign students enrolled in American universities hasn't gone down yet, although some schools are reporting a drop in applicants. While there's been a decline in students from the Middle East, Asian students now make up 51 percent of foreign enrollment, with Indians leading the pack, followed by those from China and South Korea. "It's a better education," says NYU senior Carmen Ho, who is from Hong...
  • TRAVEL: WINDY CITY, SERIOUS ART

    Stroll along Lake Michigan, splurge on the Magnificent Mile and indulge in deep-dish pizza--and don't miss Chicago's newest cultural destinations.Millennium Park. Frank Gehry's new 4,000-seat music pavilion crowns this 24i-acre park and garden along Lake Michigan. The lawn seats 8,000 concertgoers who can listen to classical music free of charge. See millenniumpark.org.'Seurat and the Making of "La Grande Jatte".' The Art Institute of Chicago traces Georges-Pierre Seurat's creation of the famous oil painting that features men in top hats and ladies with parasols on a grassy bank. Tickets: $12-$15. Open through Sept. 19. See artic.edu/aic.The Farnsworth House. The public can once again marvel at Ludwig Mies van der Rohe's 1951 glass house. The secluded structure is completely transparent, save for its white steel frame and an internal "utility core" that houses bathrooms. Tickets: $20. Advance registration required. See farnsworthhouse.org.
  • TIP SHEET

    HEALTHNew Rules For A Safe PregnancyThe nine months between conception and delivery are filled with anticipation, and with confusing advice: cut out alcohol, don't dye your hair, avoid Brie. Here's the latest thinking on everything from soft cheese to hot tubs.Planning ahead. Most birth defects occur three to six weeks after conception. To be safe, begin taking a daily vitamin that contains at least 400 micrograms of folic acid and not more than 5,000 units of vitamin A two months before stopping birth control. Avoid herbal formulations. (See motherisk .org.) And make sure you're immune to German measles and chickenpox, which can cause birth defects.Weight gain. Don't eat for two. In a 2002 report, the Institute of Medicine recommended that women not increase their food intake in the first trimester. Overweight women should gain no more than 15 to 25 pounds; average women, 25 to 35 pounds; thin women, 28 to 40 pounds.Food. Spend calories wisely. High levels of mercury in shark,...
  • HEALTH: NEW RULES FOR A SAFE PREGNANCY

    The nine months between conception and delivery are filled with anticipation--and with confusing advice: cut out alcohol, don't dye your hair, avoid Brie. Here's the latest thinking on everything from soft cheese to hot tubs.Planning ahead. Most birth defects occur three to six weeks after conception. To be safe, begin taking a daily prenatal vitamin that contains at least 400 micrograms of folic acid and not more than 5,000 units of vitamin A two months before going off birth control. Avoid herbal formulations. (See motherisk.org.) And make sure you're immune to German measles and chickenpox, which can cause birth defects.Weight gain. Don't eat for two. In a 2002 report, the Institute of Medicine recommended that women not increase their food intake in the first trimester. Overweight women should gain no more than 15 to 25 pounds; average women, 25 to 35 pounds; thin women, 28 to 40 pounds.Food. Spend calories wisely. High levels of mercury in shark, swordfish, king mackerel and...
  • PERISCOPE

    SAUDI ARABIA: Holier Than Thou ...
  • FAMILY: MAKE A BIG SPLASH

    Breaking a bone is almost a childhood ritual. So is getting signatures on your cast--and keeping it dry. Because bacteria thrive on moisture, wetness can lead to a serious infection. But it's summer, when kids want to swim. Here's how to stay dry and not miss out on the fun:Gore-Tex liners. Sometimes used in fiber-glass casts, the material helps water evaporate. Insurance companies don't always want to pay extra for it. See goremedical.com.Buy a latex cover. Pull a bright blue XeroSox Pro Pump ($29 to $39; xerosox.com) over a cast--and then squeeze the special pump to vacuum- seal it.Go basic. Grab a sturdy bag and fasten it with duct tape or rubber bands. But doctors still discourage kids from getting soaked. "No child's life is going to be ruined by a short time not being in the water," says Dr. Stuart Weinstein, a pediatric orthopedic surgeon at the University of Iowa. Try telling that to an 8-year-old.
  • MCDONALDS: HOLD THE CHEESE, PLEASE

    Nearly a year ago, Cathy Kapica, a director of nutrition education at Quaker Oats, got an offer to be McDonald's first "global nutrition director." "I was skeptical," she says. And for good reason: in a nation plagued by obesity, McDonald's is viewed as public enemy No. 1. But the more Kapica considered the job, the more she saw the good she could do, since McDonald's serves 47 million meals a day. "What better way to effect change?" she says. And so Kapica signed on last fall. In-house nutritionists are now a vital part of food companies' efforts to respond to increasing pressure from health officials. Critics, like Michael Jacobsen of the Center for Science in the Public Interest, deride these dietitians as "PR agents for indefensible products." Nonetheless, fast-food companies do appear to be thinking healthier: before Kapica's arrival, McDonald's already planned to phase out supersize items and add entree salads and lower-fat McNuggets. Kapica is helping to develop a line of low...
  • MONUMENTS: GIVE ME LIBERTINI

    The Statue of Liberty isn't reopening for two more months, but the hoopla has already begun. This week the Ritz-Carlton at Battery Park is adding an edible statue-shaped swizzle stick to its $13 green Libertini cocktail and launching a $339 Liberty for All package that includes a telescope-equipped guest room, two tickets to Liberty Island and a statue replica in chocolate. Macy's has commissioned a statue-inspired song, "The Gift of Light," and will feature a tribute to Lady Liberty in its July 4 fireworks displays. (It will also add a Statue of Liberty float to its Thanksgiving Day parade.) Publishers are jumping aboard with offerings like "Liberty" by Stephen Coonts, a thriller partly set inside the statue. Two standouts for kids: "Building Liberty: A Statue Is Born" by French author Serge Hochain and "The Statue of Liberty" by Elaine Landau. "It's an upbeat event," says Tim Calkins, a marketing professor at Northwestern's Kellogg School of Management. "There's very little...
  • YOUR YARD IN 500 B.C.

    Eager to distract your kids from their bug collections? Hook them on geology. With a few books and some easy-to-gather gear, you can delve into the ancient history of your own backyard. To collect rocks and (if you're lucky) fossils, find a hammer, an old screwdriver and an eye shield--"your own personal collecting tools," advises San Diego State geologist Eleanora Robbins, coauthor of "What's Under Your Feet?" ($5 at pennirubin.com). Fossils, she says, aren't necessarily rare and can be found near the surface. Consult the "Geology Underfoot" and "Roadside Geology" series or the kids' book "On This Spot" by Susan Goodman. Still have questions? Call the U.S. Geological Survey (www.usgs.gov) at 888-ASK-USGS. If you live in Minnesota or Wisconsin, you might learn your yard was once cut by a glacier. Now that rocks.
  • DRASTICALLY DOWNSIZED

    At the age of 7, Nikki Morace weighed 160 pounds. By 9, she was up to 250 and had tried every diet from salads to Slim-Fast. Despite her efforts, she tipped the scales at 363 pounds by 14. Her heart was enlarged, her liver was inflamed and her face turned blue when she exercised. Finally, she told her mom she wanted to take a drastic step. Together, the two flew from their Deer Park, Texas, home to the Cincinnati Children's Hospital for bariatric surgery. Doctors bypassed part of Morace's stomach and small intestine so she could eat and absorb far less food. Today, a year after surgery, Morace carries 207 pounds on her 6-foot-1 frame, pitches for her softball team and happily recounts attending a recent school dance. "I feel like a whole other person," she says.More teenagers are following Morace's example. Roughly 140,000 people will undergo gastric-bypass surgery this year, up from 103,000 last year, according to the American Society for Bariatric Surgery. And though no one tracks...
  • In The News: Make Mine Rare

    All right, so maybe Atkins wasn't a nut. Two papers published in the Annals of Internal Medicine last week report that low-carb diets help patients lose weight faster than conventional plans. In a six-month study of 120 obese people, those on a low-carb diet lost an average of 26 pounds, compared with those on a conventional low-fat, low-calorie diet, who lost just 14 pounds. In a 12-month study, however, the carb counters lost about the same amount as those on a conventional diet--though they tested slightly better on triglyceride and blood-sugar levels. "The take-home message is that, in the longer term, there isn't a whole lot of difference in weight loss between a low-carbohydrate and a low-fat diet," says Dr. Christine Laine, senior deputy editor at the Annals of Internal Medicine. An editorial accompanying the studies says it's fine to experiment with reduced-carb diets--as long as you maintain weight loss and eat "healthy sources of fat and protein and incorporate regular...
  • The High Cost Of Summer Cash

    Soon the final school bell will ring, and 4 million teenagers will start their summer jobs. Aaron Janssen is one of them. Janssen, 16, is psyched to have landed a stint as a cook near his home in Iowa; working makes him feel like his dad and will help him buy a car. The job's hazards don't concern him. "Everyone knows to be careful," he says. But a working teenager can be a perfect storm of eagerness and inexperience, and here's a case in point: last week a 15-year-old boy died in a job-related accident while working for a Maryland landscaping firm.While putting high-school students to work has obvious benefits, it also holds considerable risks. Each year, more than 70,000 working teenagers end up in the emergency room because of work-related injuries, according to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. Even more worrisome are fatalities: about 70 teens die on the job each year, mostly in farm and retail work. Government agencies hope to cast new light on these...
  • Family: New At The Zoo

    So what if an African safari isn't in the family budget? These new exhibits may be the next best thing. For info on other animal havens, go to the American Zoo and Aquarium Association's aza.org.Jacksonville Zoo & Gardens, Jacksonville, Fla., jaxzoo.org. Watch jaguars in their natural habitat, joined by some 100 other animal species like tapirs, capybaras and howler monkeys. Adults: $9.50. Kids 3 to 12: $5.Henry Doorly Zoo, Omaha, Neb., omahazoo.com. The Hubbard Gorilla Valley hosts 11 apes (including the world's first test-tube gorilla) as they climb on vines and mate beneath 24-foot trees. Adults: $9.75. Kids 5 to 11: $6.Cleveland Metroparks Zoo, clemetzoo.com. Animals need their checkups, too. Stop by the Center for Zoological Medicine to watch vets in action. Adults: $9. Kids 2 to 11: $4. Opens July 23.Point Defiance Zoo, Tacoma, Wash., pdza.org. The Asian Forest Sanctuary simulates the habitat of Sumatran tigers and gibbons. Opens July 18. Adults: $7.75. Kids 4 to 13: $6.
  • Alcohol's Deadly Triple Threat

    Pat Staples's childhood gave birth to the demons that nearly killed her. Her father was a volatile alcoholic. "I was physically, verbally and emotionally abused," she says. "Nose broken, head into the walls." In kindergarten she started dreaming about running away; she finally escaped in 1959, at the age of 20, when she married young to get out of the alcoholic house. But she couldn't flee her past. Over the years she gradually became an addict herself--first with pills and then with alcohol. Still, her life seemed good on the surface. The marriage endured, defying the odds, and she and her husband had two daughters. "Our house was on the home tour," she says. "Our kids were perfect."The reality was far more bleak. She felt constantly under stress, anxious and terrified. "I was taking pills and drinking to keep it up," she says. Her husband started marking the liquor bottles, but she would just add water so he couldn't tell how much she had drunk. Finally, one day in 1985, Staples...
  • Putting It All Together

    Like most women, Helen Bryce, 44, wife, mother and manager at a London-based computer company, was well acquainted with the emotional chambers in her heart. Joy, sadness, love. But Bryce never thought much about her heart as a muscular pump: the size of a fist, weighing less than a can of soda, beating 100,000 times a day. And she certainly didn't think it was vulnerable to disease. Neither did her doctor. When she went to him complaining of stomach cramps last May, he told her it was indigestion. When the cramps didn't go away, the diagnosis changed to gallstones. But while Bryce was waiting for her nonpriority gallstones appointment--weeks away--the pains got so bad that she was rushed to the hospital by ambulance. The diagnosis: heart attack. "I didn't think [the doctor] was talking to me," she says. "I was thinking, 'Women my age can't have heart problems'."That's a misconception many women share. According to the World Heart Federation, heart disease is the No. 1 cause of...
  • Mysteries: The Kid 'Code'

    Harry Potter" author J. K. Rowling is "happily writing," says Scholastic Book Group president Barbara Marcus. But sorry, kids: there won't be a new installment this year. Instead, Harryheads can turn to "Chasing Vermeer," a mystery out this month that critics are calling a "Da Vinci Code" for tweens. ( "It's darn clever," says Joe Monti, a buyer for Barnes & Noble. "A real gem," says Linda Bubon, co-owner of the Chicago bookstore Women & Children First.) The tale, about a sixth-grade girl and boy searching for a stolen Vermeer painting, is by first-time author Blue Balliett, a former art-history major and teacher. Brett Helquist, illustrator of the Lemony Snicket series, arted the book, which five U.S. publishers bid on. "If somebody had told me that [would happen] when I was picking salamior old gum off my classroom floor, I would have said, 'No way'," Balliett says. She's already writing a sequel, a mystery surrounding a Frank Lloyd Wright house in Chicago's Hyde Park....
  • Smoking Gun

    Quick--what's the leading cancer killer of women? If you answered "breast cancer," you're not alone--but you're wrong. Lung cancer is far deadlier. Its five-year survival rate is 15 percent, compared with 86 percent for breast cancer, and it takes a bigger toll. Though the disease is largely preventable, the annual toll has grown by 600 percent since 1930. The reason: cigarettes. In the United States, more than 85 percent of women who get lung cancer are current or former smokers--yet one woman in five still smokes. "People have a general sense that tobacco is harmful," says Dr. Michele Bloch of the U.S. National Cancer Institute, "but they don't appreciate the magnitude of the risk."Cigarettes can kill anyone, but the risks are especially high for women. New studies suggest that women develop lung cancer at a younger age than men, and after fewer years of smoking. Why are women more susceptible? They may metabolize the carcinogens in tobacco differently, says University of...
  • Health: Hit Your Stride

    If you're not already taking steps to stay in shape, here's some extra incentive. A study in the May issue of the American College of Sports Medicine's journal, Medicine & Science in Sports and Exercise, reports that 40- to 66-year-old women who walked more than 10,000 steps a day (about five miles) averaged 18 percent less body fat and had slimmer waists than those who walked fewer than 6,000 steps.To calculate how many steps you take buy a pedometer, a motion-sensitive device that resembles a tiny beeper and clips onto your waistband. "It's a great motivator," says Dixie Thompson, the study's lead author. Penn State University exercise physiologist Guy Le Masurier recommends the Walk4Life LS2525 ($29, available at walk4life.com) and the Yamax Digi-Walker SW-701 ($24 to $30, at thepedometercompany .com). Track the number of steps you take on an ordinary day and work up to your goal. Aim for a brisk pace of 100 to 150 steps per minute. But don't fret if you walk slower--anything...
  • Alcohol's Deadly Triple Threat

    Pat Staples's childhood gave birth to the demons that nearly killed her. Her father was a volatile alcoholic. "I was physically, verbally and emotionally abused," she says. "Nose broken, head into the walls." In kindergarten she started dreaming about running away; she finally escaped in 1959, at the age of 20, when she married young to get out of the alcoholic house. But she couldn't flee her past. Over the years she gradually became an addict herself--first with pills and then with alcohol. Still, her life seemed good on the surface. The marriage endured, defying the odds, and she and her husband had two healthy daughters. "Our house was on the home tour," she says. "Our kids were perfect."The reality was far more bleak. She felt constantly under stress, anxious and terrified. "I was taking pills and drinking to keep it up," she says. Her husband started marking the bottles in the bar area, but she would just add water so he couldn't tell how much she had drunk. He checked the...