Kate Dailey

Stories by Kate Dailey

  • Lady Gaga's 'Telephone' Has Company: Some of the Best Military Music Videos

    If you've been anywhere near a computer for over the past week, you've probably caught a glimpse of the "Telephone" video created by military members stationed in Afghanistan. What first looks like goofing off by two bored soldiers is later revealed to be a big production, complete with costumes, elaborate choreography, and not-bad editing....
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    Stuff: Compulsive Hoarding and the Meaning of Things

    Randy O. Frost and Gail Steketee share an inside look into the cluttered brains of compulsive hoarders. Through profiles of their patients, the authors, both of whom have studied hoarding for years, provide a comprehensive view on the disorder that leaves its sufferers buried in junk—and sometimes literally trapped in their own homes.
  • Secret Teenage Sex Codes Revealed!

    At least, that was the promise of a press release that landed in the NEWSWEEK inboxes this morning. "Secret texting codes: Are kids having sex and getting high under your nose?" asked the release. It's true: Under Your Nose has become a popular make out spot for today's youth. The solution, says this e-mail, is an interview with two authors willing to discuss both the perils of sexting and the value of good manners. The authors can also help parents decode the secret texting codes teens use to talk about sex, drugs, and, presumably, bad manners. To wit: LH6 . P911 . 8 . Al Capone . if your kids use secret texting codes like these, they just said "let's have sex (LH6)", "alert—parents coming into the room (P911)", "oral sex (8)" and "heroin (Al Capone)" Make no mistake: that would have been one hell of a text. But what's more shocking is the continued attempts to rend garments over sexting, or the assumption that...
  • BREAKING: Lesbian Divorce Appealed in Texas by Attorney General

    Yesterday, Eve Conant reported on the difficulties same-sex couples face when they seek to end their partnerships. In some cases, partners who get married in one state find themselves unable to get divorced in another (most states have no residency requirements for marriage, but do for divorce). The inability to divorce creates a series of legal, financial, and childcare problems, while also preventing those in the failed partnership to move on with their lives. Conant opened the story with two women who seemed to have beaten the odds. Angelique Naylor and Sabina Daly, who were married five years ago in Massachusetts, finalized their divorce in the state of Texas last month, making them the first gay couple to be legally divorced in that state. The only thing that could overturn the divorce was an appeal by the Attorney General Greg Abbott. Today Naylor says she received her notice of appeal in the mail. The fate of Daly and Naylor's marriage now lies in the hands of the...
  • At the Masters, Phil Mickelson's Win Takes Tiger off the Table

    When Tiger Woods scored a hole in one on the seventh hole at the Masters this Sunday, he threw his hands up in a small celebration. For an instant, the strained look he’d been wearing for most of the tournament passed, but even though that shot put him back in the running for the green jacket, he didn’t seem jubilant. His demonstration seemed, like most of Woods’s play this weekend, forced and rote.Compare that with the sheer joy on Phil Mickelson’s face when he took home the top prize later that day, and the long embrace he shared with his wife, Amy. Mickelson’s game had been off for about 11 months—about the same amount of time Amy has been treated for breast cancer. She was on the course today, watching her husband play brilliant, enthusiastic golf. A few other comparisons: Mickelson created a heartwarming photo op earlier in the week when he invited his wife’s doctor to caddie a few holes during the Houston Open; Woods had security in place at the Masters to prevent any...
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    Orange Is the New Black: My Year in a Women’s Prison

    Ten years after her minor role in an international drug ring, Piper Kerman leaves her bourgeois, lefty, New York City lifestyle for a 15-month stint in a minimum-security federal prison. In her new memoir, she chronicles surviving her year in the Federal Correctional Institution in Danbury, Conn., and coming to terms with her past bad behavior.
  • Leslie Knope, Liz Lemon, and the Feminist Lessons of NBC's 'Parks and Recreation'

    Liz Lemon, the fictional TV writer at the center of NBC’s hit show 30 Rock, is often cited as an example of the modern-day working woman and the face of modern feminism. Her appeal to smart, independent women is understandable; Lemon heads her department at work, struggles with that elusive work/life balance, fights stereotypes about body image and "ladylike" behavior, and often feels like the only sane voice in an office full of lunatics. But Liz Lemon’s feminism can be problematic. At least, that’s what TigerBeatdown blogger Sady Doyle argues in a fantastic post published last month. She outlines 13 different ways of thinking about Lemon, but here are some of the highlights: 1.    Lemon is portrayed as an “exceptional” woman: the only smart, capable woman in a field of slutty, slobby, neurotic morons. The other women on the show, notes Doyle, are not friends or equals, but reminders that other girls can be so, so dumb—and therefore not worthy of femi...
  • UPDATE: Hank Johnson, Guam, and Hepatitis C: U.S. Rep Suffers From Too-Common Illness

    Earlier today, we (along with a lot of other Web sites) poked fun at Rep. Hank Johnson's assertion that, were the U.S. to relocate naval personnel to Guam, "my fear is that the whole island will become so overly populated that it will tip over and capsize." Over at The Gaggle, we called it the quote of the day, noting that "Guam is 212 square miles with a population of 175,877 (2008 estimate)."  ...
  • Ben Folds on Chat Roulette, Again

    Ben Folds just posted another Chat Roulette improv session on YouTube:  What does this have to do with The Human Condition? I'm human, and my condition is that I need to take a break and watch some piano for a few minutes before heading back to work. For everyone else who needs a little mental-health break, enjoy.And now that I have your attention, I'll be speaking at Pace University tomorrow from 9 to 11 as part of a panel on how media deals with weight and weight loss. Emme will be there! More info here. 
  • Gay Activists Stage Civil Disobedience as Health Reform Gets Closer to a Vote

    While national attention was focused on the release of CBO numbers on the proposed health-care-reform bill (or, more likely, NCAA basketball), gay activists kicked off a campaign of civil disobedience that has already resulted in several arrests. It began when Lt. Dan Choi, an outspoken opponent of the military's "don't ask, don't tell" policy, hijacked an anti-DADT rally hosted by Kathy Griffin (Griffin, it appears, had no problem with the interruption), leading those in attendance to the White House. There, he handcuffed himself to the gates along with fellow activist Capt. Jim Pietrangelo. ...
  • The Tupperware Effect: Can Direct Sales Help Women Living in Poverty Throughout the World?

    While direct sales presents a potential career path for Americans looking for work, most of the growth for companies like Tupperware and Avon is happening abroad—specifically, in emerging markets like Africa and Indonesia. The presence of these companies in poor nations have provided a much-needed chance for women to gain economic independence. It's been a successful partnership on both sides, and the impact of these companies is starting to attract attention. Rick Goings, the CEO of Tupperware, recently returning from the World Economic Forum at Davos, where “more and more people are starting to talk about our kind of business,” he says. “Even in Davos, they’re talking about the Tupperware effect.”What is the Tupperware effect? It’s when direct-sales companies go into developing markets and, in the course of building their business, build up the opportunities for the women that work with them. “We will provide her microfinancing, we will train her, we will provide her with a coach...
  • Newsweek Rumblr: Tiger Woods Apology Edition

    Rumblr is a forum for NEWSWEEK staffers to debate the big issues of the day, using the blog platform Tumblr. Early today, Mark Coatney, Andrew Cohen, Raina Kelley, and I gathered to discuss our reactions to the Tiger Woods apology. Excerpts are below. (Click here to follow the whole conversation, complete with links, tweets, and some great photos.) Kate Dailey:  The Big QuestionsWas Tiger sincere?Can people really change?Can a marriage survive the infidelity and dishonesty that the Woods marriage did?Is it fair to ask the media to back off his family, or is that a privileged celebs earn by not being cheating jerks?Is “I ask you to find room in your heart to believe in me again” the cheesiest closing line ever?Mark Coatney:  Personally, I think that only heartfelt line in that whole thing was when Tiger apologized to his sponsors.And “I ask you to find room in your heart to believe in me again” was indeed cheesy, but, come on, is this a surprise?KD:  I couldn’t tell if it was Tiger...
  • Bill Clinton's Stent: It Could Happen to Anyone. Plus: What Happens During a Stent Procedure.

    Yes, Bill Clinton has had a heart attack heart problems in the past. And yes, Clinton loved his cheeseburgers. But the two stents that he received today might have more to do with heredity than habits. Since his quadruple bypass surgery in 2004, reports were that Bill was a changed man. In the 500-page political Us Weekly that is Game Change, authors John Heilemann and Mark Halperin note that when Clinton campaigned for his wife in South Carolina, he skipped the deep-fried, fat-laden soul food in favor of more heart-healthy fare. But apparently, that wasn't enough. It's entirely possible that Clinton fell off the wagon, and Lord knows that his stressful schedule doesn't lend itself to healthy habits. But the scary thing about heart disease is that while there is a lot you can do to help tip the scales in your favor, there are some things over which you have no control—like a genetic predisposition toward arterial blockage. One of my previous bosses, the fantastic...
  • Lindsey Vonn's Sports Illustrated Cover: Sexist or Sporty? Two NEWSWEEK Writers Discuss.

    On Friday, NEWSWEEK’s Sarah Ball and Kate Dailey discussed the controversy over the Lindsey Vonn Sports Illustrated cover as part of a rapid-fire roundtable discussion on Tumblr. Excerpts from their discussion (cleaned up a bit, now that we’ve had time to spell-check) are posted here. To read the entire debate—and comment on the opinions expressed—visit NEWSWEEK's Tumblr page or click here. ...
  • Dudes Like Beer and Ladies Are a Drag: Twitter's Best Responses to the Super Bowl's Worst Ads

    Here's the bad news: the one unifying theme of this year's Super Bowl ads (aside from panstlessness) was stone-cold misogyny. Men trading their wives for tires, men eschewing island rescue in favor of hot-tub time with some sexy stewardesses, men unwillingly being dragged away from the electronics section and forced to comment on candle scent with their lingerie-shopping sweeties. ...
  • Obama to Repeal 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell'? Progressives Will Believe It When They See It (Updated)

    According to The Washington Post, President Barack Obama is going to call for the repeal of the military’s ban on openly gay members, otherwise known as "don’t ask, don’t tell." This was a big campaign promise, and one that many hoped would be completed within the president’s first 100 days. But Obama, as is his wont, has been playing that centrist, appeasing, consensus thing that so infuriates progressives. And now that he’s finally ready to make good, it may be too late. ...
  • The iPad: Love It or Hate It, but Leave Periods Out of It

    When I was 7, my best friend and I decided we wanted to start either a detective agency or a Tommy Page fan club. I can’t quite remember what, but either way, we needed to get some notebooks to make things official. We rode our bikes to the local pharmacy and asked for pads. The clerk very calmly asked, “Stationery or sanitary?” We were mortified. But we were 7, and when you’re 7, periods are both hysterical and terrifying. But the clerk, who was an adult, didn’t bat an eye. Even though this was before ThinkPads and TouchPads and the brand-new Apple iPad, he knew that “pad” is a pretty useful, generic term that has all sorts of applications. Why, within the clerk’s small store alone, there were notepads and gauze pads and corn pads and sanitary pads and heating pads and cleansing pads. He also knew, making his living in a slightly medical field, that periods happen, and sanitary pads exist, and that neither of these facts is worth getting all giggly and red-faced about.Were that...
  • More H1N1 Vaccine Recalled, For the Best Reason One Would Want a Vaccine Pulled Off the Shelves (But Still ...)

    Another batch of H1N1 vaccine has been recalled, this time the nasal-spray version made by AstraZeneca. According to the FDA, 4.7 million doses of MedImmune were recalled yesterday. Last week, the vaccine made headlines when it was revealed that 800,000 vials of the children's vaccine, made by Sanofi-Aventis SA, were also being recalled. Luckily, neither company's products are being recalled due to any serious safety concerns─in fact, the only safety concern is that the vaccine might not protect against H1N1. However, it does present a troubling problem that health officials will need to address sooner rather than later. In both cases, the vaccine was recalled due to the lower-than-usual potency of the doses. H1N1 vaccines are made with the H1N1 virus, to which the body reacts and produced antibodies. In the case of the pediatric vaccine, the virus was de-activated. The nasal vaccine used a live virus. But both vaccines tested less powerful than needed to fight H1N1...
  • Sexting in America: The Medium, the Message and the Truth About Teens

        Sexting has become so serious that cell-phone companies are now creating public-service announcements for the specific purpose of dissuading teenagers from sending one another racy messages.  LG has unveiled a series of ads about the consequences of impulsive texting, encouraging kids—through the dulcet tones of James Lipton—to "give it a ponder" before spreading a nasty text rumor or sending out a camera-phone pic of one's junk.  One's junk, actually, gets a bit shortchanged in the Lipton PSA, considering how prevalent sexting has become. A new study shows that a quarter of teens sext. It was sexting that contributed to the downfall of  both Carrie Prejean and Tiger Woods. Sexting was a pivotal plot point on Glee. And while I personally know people who have sent and received "sexts," I have yet to meet anyone who was the victim of a widespread text rumor campaign. (Then again, I don't even know how to send group texts).  I'm also not a high-s...
  • Is It Possible That Max Baucus's Girlfriend Would Make an Excellent U.S. Attorney?

    Over at the Human Condition, I posted a defense of Max Baucus—or rather, a defense of Melodee Hanes, the woman who somehow lost all of her credibility, intellect, and experience because her boyfriend happens to be a senator. (Maybe it has to do with the terminology: "boyfriend" and "girlfriend" instantly manages to make both parties sound like horny high-school seniors.) As I write in the post:...