Stories by Kate Dailey

  • Really, Really Dirty Dancing: More On Daggering

    This article is an update to the post we published on FridayIn the video, (NSFW) a young woman stands on her head, legs spread. Two men stand straight on either side of her. As crowds look on, the two men begin to push her back and forth by her ankles until finally she’s flipped over and thrown into one man’s arms, legs over his shoulders. As he gyrates and thrusts onto her limp body, the DJ in the background urges them on. The woman is then thrown back to the other man, who grabs her from behind and begins to grind into her.This isn’t Internet porn—it’s a YouTube video of “daggering,” a type of dance popular with some of Jamaica’s poorest citizens. It’s exuberant, vulgar, and may be responsible for a string of highly painful and personal injuries occurring out of the clubs in the bedroom. Music associated with daggering has been banned from the airwaves due to its lewd content, and the super-suggestive moves have the guardians of Jamaican culture sounding the alarm. But is...
  • The Consult: Easing Into Monday, And Other News From The Web

    A Woman's Victorious Tale of Cancer Survival: A nice read for those of you (like me) moving a little slowly this morning. No need to rush into the work week head on! (Pharmablog)Tickling Gorillas: Will be the name of the NEWSWEEK.com house band. It's also part of a process scientists are using to categorize human laughter. This is old news to fans of public radio, since it was featured on Wait, Wait, Don't Tell Me this weekend, but if you want more of the science behind punchlines, check out this very interesting (and only slightly nerdy) post. (Scienceblogs) The Science Behind Science: A week after Sharon Begely wrote her great piece on gender inequity in math, Slate examines a study on creating parity between men and women in science: hire more female science teachers.When a...
  • Andrew Sullivan's Brave and Brilliant Abortion Blogging

    Take some time today to visit Andrew Sullivan's blog over at the Atlantic, where one of the most capital-F fascinating discussions in recent blog history (which is pretty much all of blog history) is taking place. ...
  • EMT Charged in Facebook Crime-Scene Photo Leak

    Last month, NEWSWEEK's Jessica Bennett's wrote a heartbreaking story about the Catsouras family, who are fighting to scrub the internet of gristly accident-scene photos taken moments after their daughter Nikki's death. Now, another tale of private, post-mortem photos posted online has made the news. ...
  • The Consult: The Sum Of Your Parts, And Other News From Around The Web

    When Is A Donor Kidney Not a Donor Kidney? When it comes from the body of a convicted killer. A very small British study showed people were strongly wary of organ transplants if the donor had questionable morals (or no morals, in the case of a murderer). The students polled were much more likely to prefer donors who were good people. No word on how those scores would change were the students polled in dire need of an organ transplant. (BBC)...
  • Oprah Responds To NEWSWEEK's Cover Story

    According to Entertainment Tonight, Oprah has responded to NEWSWEEK's cover story this week, “Crazy Talk: Oprah, Wacky Cures & You.” Sayeth Oprah: For 23 years, my show has presented thousands of topics that reflect the human experience, including doctors' medical advice and personal health stories that have prompted conversations between our audience members and their health care providers. I trust the viewers, and I know that they are smart and discerning enough to seek out medical opinions to determine what may be best for them. That's very similar to the statement she issued to reporters Weston Kosova and Pat Wingert, who wrote the NEWSWEEK story, but it doesn't address the questions raised by the article. Read Kosova and Wingert's original article here.Read the response from the web here.Read Raina Kelley's take on whether criticizing Oprah is appropriate here.
  • Noah Cyrus, Situation Critical: Miley's Little Sis Is 9 Going On 29.

    A few months ago, NEWSWEEK published an article called "Generation Diva," about the increased interest tween girls show for things like pedicures, facials, cosmetics and other beauty treatments previously considered grown-up luxuries. (One could argue that "diva" is a pejorative term that puts...
  • Is It Racist To Criticize Oprah? Raina Kelley Responds

    Not everyone responded positively to the NEWSWEEK cover story on Oprah's role in promoting questionable medical advice. Several commentors questioned if this article is another example of how, as reader Doris Grayson (graysond) writes, "the media can't accept a powerful, decent Black woman as a role model."  Another reader, pencilcase, thinks, "Oprah's being attacked because the thought of a poor overweight black looking black woman from the ghetto transforming herself into one of the richest & most influential people in the world (& daring to use thatt influence to help make a black man president) makes the white media elite's stomach turn." ...
  • Stop Doing Sit-Ups: Why Crunches Don't Work

    Everyone knows that the road to flat, tight abs is paved with crunches. Lots and lots and lots of excruciating crunches. Or is it?As it turns out, the exercises synonymous with strong, attractive abs may not be the best way to train your core—and may be doing damage to your back.  “We stopped teaching people to do crunches a long, long time ago,” says Dr. Richard Guyer, president of the Texas Back Institute.  That’s because the “full flex” movement—the actual “crunch” part of crunches – puts an unhealthy strain on your back at its weakest point. The section with the most nerves (and most potential for nerve damage) is in the back of the spine, which is the very part that bends and strains during a sit-up.“There are only so many bends or a ‘fatigue life’,” in your spinal disks,” says Stuart M. McGill, a professor of spine biomechanics at the University of Waterloo. Inside each disk is a mucus-like nucleus, he says, and “if you keep flexing your spine and bending the disk over and...
  • Hey, Did You Hear We Took on Oprah? The Blog-o-sphere Reacts

    Yesterday, the latest issue of NEWSWEEK hit the stands, featuring Weston Kosova and Pat Wingert's smart, gutsy cover story on what one might call the Oprah Winfrey Medical Misinformation Complex, were one not so afraid of a lawsuit. Shorter version (though you should read the whole thing): Oprah, who has tremendous influence and credibility, promotes health "cures" that may be at best ineffective and at worst dangerous. Both media and medical bloggers took note of the story, and have been discussing its merits online. Some examples:...
  • The Consult: 50-percent video addition, and other news from around the web.

    Sad News For Children With Autism An anti-depressant commonly used to treat the repetitive behaviors of children with autism is as effective as a placebo—but with worse side effects. Citalopram improved repetitive behaviors—like flapping—in 33 percent of autistic children in a trial. Sounds impressive, except that 34 percent of those taking the placebo also improved.  (LA Times) ...
  • The Consult: Farm-Fresh Fumes, and Other News From the Web.

    How Green Is My Produce? Locally grown produce bought at the farmer's market may be delicious, nutritious, and good for the local economy, but it's probably not helping reduce the use of fossil fuels. Or so argues Brian Dunning over at Skeptic Blog "Locally grown produce is rarely efficient," he says. "Apply a little mathematics...
  • Levi Johnston Speaks Truth, Removes Top

    In between his media tour and duties as a teenage father, Levi Johnston has apparently been hitting the gym.  Johnston is best known as baby daddy to Bristol Palin's son, Tripp, and author of such MySpace gems as "I'm a f---in' redneck" and "I like to go camping and hang out with the boys, do some fishing, shoot some s--- and just f---in' chillin' I guess." (Kids, please remember that the Internet is forever. Pretend your mother is reading what you write at all times. You'll thank me in 10 years.) As the media circus around Bristol's pregnancy and ensuing motherhood continues, however, it's Johnston that's speaking the most rationally about sex education and the realities of teenage parenting. (Bristol is back promoting abstinence after a brief stint where she said it was "unrealistic"). Citing Johnston as a beacon of clarity truth sounds a little crazy. Him taking his shirt of for GQ and hanging 24/7 with...
  • Guy Grooming: The Video Showdown

    What's that you say? Pouring over autism research is not how you want to spend the last  few hours of the work week? Fine: less medical debate, more videos about male hair removal. ...
  • Why Good Parents Believe Myths About Autism and Vaccines

    Hot on the heels of Sarah Kliff's insanely entertaining article on why medical myths endure, health blogger Scott Hensley points us toward a new analysis behind one of the most divisive and persistent medical myths of the modern age: that childhood vaccines can lead to autism. (Send angry e-mails c/o NEWSWEEK.) ...
  • The Consult: Take Me Out To the Deathtrap, And Other News From Around the Web

    Baseball's Dirty Secret: Jon Mooallem at Slate observes that the average baseball game sends up to 40 high-speed projectiles (foul balls and home runs) into the stands, which can lead to deadly consequences. He reviews a new book which aspires to serves as comprehensive chronicle of all deaths during baseball games since the 1862. The authors of Death At The Ballpark found 850 incidents; baseball fans have already alerted them to at least another 50. At what price Dollar Dog Night?  (Slate)...
  • True Dirt: An Artist Looks at Food and Waste

    Baltimore-based artist Hugh Pocock's new art exhibit, "My Food, My Poop," attempts to represent the complex relationship between the food we take in, the energy we expend, and the waste we create....
  • Botox Goes (Even More) Plastic

    UPDATE: Trying to figure out if this is a credit card or just a gift card, per the comments below.   Can't afford one of those anti-aging spermin facials? Eager to extend your credit limit while reducing your smile lines*? You're in luck: Botox has unveiled a credit card....
  • RIP Maria Amelia Lopez

    The self-proclaimed "World's Oldest Blogger" passed away on May 20th. She was 97. (Philly.com)Her blog (in Spanish).
  • The Consult: Another Reason Technology Might Kill You, and Other News from Around the Web

    Technology Is Dangerous, Chapter Two Hundred: Another article about the unknown health effects of new technology, this time in Monday's New York Times (I missed it over the holiday  my mistake.) The article looks at all the potential adverse reactions that could be linked to too much texting. Suspects include: lack of sleep, stunted emotional development, thumb cramping. But before you banish your Blackberry to a drawer, note the fine print: "The rise in texting is too recent to have produced any conclusive data on health effects." Call me when you know something for real, guys (New York Times) ...
  • Without Comment: Sperm-based Facials May Reduce Signs of Aging

    At The Human Condition, we like to provide commentary on the week's news and events as they relate to medicine, health, and life. Sometimes, however, there are news stories for which no comment is necessary. This is one such story. From NYMag.com: Spermine, a powerful anti-oxidant originally discovered in, yes, human sperm, is said to diminish wrinkles and smooth the skin. The substance is now being synthesized in laboratories and sold by a Norwegian company called (seriously) Bioforskning. Spermine facials (really) cost $250 at Townhouse Spa, where the substance is penetrated with ultrasound and infrared light (a more basic treatment can be found for $125 at the nearby Graceful Services). Also available at Townhouse for $175: snail-secretion facials.
  • Good News: Credit Protection Passes. Bad News: Your Brain Doesn't Care

    There's lots of blame to go around in this current credit crisis: predatory lenders, borrowers outreaching their grasp, lax government regulators. President Obama and Congress are trying to pass legislation that makes it safer for consumers—and hopefully more stable for the future economy—by putting more stringent restrictions on credit companies. ...
  • The Consult: Are Sexy Sims Hurting Girls? And Other News From Around the Web

    Do Virtual Girls Face Real Danger? Here's a shocker: girls with sexier avatars, or online representations, are more likely to get sexual come-ons while online. Girls who design their online personas to have skimpy wardrobes and curvy figures are also more likely to be preoccupied with sex, according to the journal Pediatrics. The study also speculates—without studying—that these girls are more likely to experiment with sexual activity at an earlier age. That's a bold claim to make without testing: who's to say that a little online sexual role play isn't helping teenage girls curious about sex fulfill that curiosity in a safer way? The increased sexual attention is something to consider when talking with your daughter about her online persona, and it makes sense to educate kids on the main dos and don't of online conduct. And while I'm disheartened by how sexualized society is for even younger kids, I'd like to see more research before we...
  • Good Morning, Takeaway Listeners: Further Thoughts On Medical Neglect

    Those of you who caught me on Public Radio International's The Takeaway earlier this morning may want to take a look at these articles, which discuss the issues surrounding Daniel Hauser and Alexander Draper more in-depth. (Those who missed me live can hear the segment by visiting The Takeaway's website: just click the first link).  ...
  • The Consult: A Wilco Tragedy, And Other News From Around the Web

    The Less-Than-Magnificent Defeat Jay Bennett, a former member of the band Wilco, passed away in his sleep this weekend. Though much is still unknown about his death (including the primary cause), we do know this: Bennett, who had publicly struggled with drug addiction, was in need of a new hip and without the health insurance to pay for it. As a result, he was depressed, anxious, and bedridden. Gawker asks if any of these factors played into his untimely demise, and the site's commenters answer with a dynamic discussion about universal health care, personal responsibility, and the red tape that can keep creative types unprotected. (Gawker)...
  • Memorial Day's Super-Cool Origins

     A discussion on the beach about the purpose of Memorial Day lead me to this bit of information, via Wikipedia: ...
  • Draper Case: What Makes a Parent Negligent?

    After courts questioned the way they cared for their sick kids, two mothers in different states ran away with their children. Why 'neglect' is such a complicated concept, and why loving a child isn't always enough.