• Pa. Gov.-Elect to Open State Land to 'Fracking'

    Beneath the Eastern U.S. is enough natural gas to power the coast, perhaps for 50 years. But the cache is cordoned off because of concerns about “fracking,” the method of harvesting gas by blasting the shale with a mix of water, sand, and chemicals.
  • Inside the Tea Party

    Sarah Palin's and Glenn Beck's tweets and teary theatrics serve as valuable spiritual fodder, but in a decentralized movement that has been compared to a starfish, here are 10 movers and shakers you should know about, some in the public eye, some in the shadows.
  • An Unofficial Medal for War Dogs

    In Iraq and Afghanistan, the nature of war has changed, forcing the Pentagon to retool for unconventional foes. Amid the push for robotic IED detectors and aerial drones, however, is renewed investment in another, less techie counterinsurgency tool: war dogs. While they’ve served in every modern conflict, no other war has so closely matched their particular skills—which helps explain why their ranks have more than doubled since 2001, from 1,300 to about 2,800 dogs, mostly German Shepherds. “The capability they bring”—to track snipers, smell explosives, and sense danger—“cannot be replicated by man or machine,” said Gen. David Petraeus in February 2008, according to an Air Force publication. He went on to urge investment in the animals, noting that “their yield outperforms any asset we have in our inventory.”
  • Cross-Party Endorsements Support Candidates, Not Canons

    Former Republican senator Chuck Hagel of Nebraska has announced his endorsement of Democrat Joe Sestak for a Pennsylvania Senate seat, adding him to a short list of political figures who step over the party line for what they believe in.
  • Virginia Attorney General Gears Up for Health-Care Fight

    Ken Cuccinelli, riding the coattails of Monday's ruling that Virginia has the right to sue against the health-care mandate, addressed a young conservative group Thursday. He made his case for the battle against the health-care bill and big government in general.
  • Congressional Approval Falls Again

    Congress has never been held in very high regard. But new numbers out today suggest a stunning drop in confidence in lawmakers across the board. Among 16 different public institutions surveyed by Gallup—from churches to news organizations—Capitol Hill ranks dead last, below banks and big industry.