Keith Naughton

Stories by Keith Naughton

  • SHELTER FROM THE STORM?

    Chiara Edmands strolled the pastel aisles of Kmart in Manhattan last week, filling her shopping cart with Martha Stewart kitchenware. She knows the domestic diva was just convicted of four felonies at the federal courthouse a few blocks away. No matter. Edmands just hopes Stewart's stylish, affordable housewares don't disappear. "I don't agree with what she's done," Edmands says as she selects a Martha chopping block, "but as long as she's around, I'll still buy."If Martha has it her way, she isn't going anywhere. With the guilty verdicts still ringing in her ears, Stewart is hard at work concocting a plan to stay out of jail. Sure, it's a long shot, but she's determined not to go down without a fight. After visiting the probation office last Monday (to submit a urine sample, among other things), Stewart sped off to persuade her board of directors not to abandon her. She insisted the $250 million company she created from scratch still needs her as a "creative force." After all, her...
  • Martha's Fall

    SHE WAS ALWAYS THE MASTER OF MANAGING HER IMAGE. BUT IN THE COURTROOM, SHE WAS AT THE MERCY OF HER LAWYERS AND THE JURY. HOW TEAM MARTHA BLEW IT, AND WHAT'S AHEAD
  • The World According to Trump

    JUST A DECADE AGO, HE WAS A PUNCH LINE, A COMBED-OVER RELIC FROM THE DECADE OF GREED. BUT HE'S BACK, AND BIGGER THAN EVER, THANKS TO HIS NEW HIT REALITY SHOW 'THE APPRENTICE.' WHY WE STILL LOVE TO OGLE HIS HOUSES, HIS HELICOPTERS AND HIS HAIR--AND TO HEAR HIM SAY: 'YOU'RE FIRED'
  • A DIVA IN DISTRESS

    It had been almost three hours since the last break in the Martha Stewart trial. The marbled federal courtroom in Manhattan was stuffy and the jurors were restless. The prosecution's star witness, Douglas Faneuil, had just given potentially damning testimony against Stewart and her stockbroker, Peter Bacanovic. And now the best defense lawyers money can buy were ready to carve up Bacanovic's former assistant. But the slight 28-year-old was no easy prey. He cleverly sidestepped their land mines. He even praised Bacanovic as "the best boss I ever had," while implicating him and Stewart in a conspiracy to cover up her suspicious ImClone stock sale. Bacanovic's lawyer, David Apfel, tried to paint Faneuil as the real liar. But Faneuil deftly deflected Apfel and put the blame back on Bacanovic and Stewart. "I felt I would be fired," Faneuil insisted, "if I didn't lie."Trials are about casting and calculations, and Faneuil's poised parrying on the stand last week offered surprises that are...
  • THE SOFT SELL

    During the third quarter of the Super Bowl on Sunday, 90 million viewers will get a break from the rough- and-tumble. A languid 60-second commercial will open with a middle-aged couple in side-by-side bathtubs on a mountain bluff, taking in a golden sunset. To the gentle strum of a jazz guitar, the spot slowly cuts to another couple canoodling at a coffeehouse. Then there's the pair riding off in a convertible, wind in their silver hair. Finally, a rugged husband lovingly startles the missus in the kitchen and drags her off for who knows what? It might look like a pitch for a dating service, but what's really for sale is sex. Or, more specifically, a sexual aid: Cialis, the latest impotence drug to take on Viagra. The Super Bowl ad, shown exclusively to NEWSWEEK, is laced with Cialis's biggest selling point--it works for up to 36 hours (the French call it "Le Weekender"). Sure, there's a mention of an unsettling side effect or two, like erections that won't go away, but overall the...
  • MARTHA'S MAKEOVER

    As Martha Stewart prepares to go on trial this month, she's carefully crafting a new, homespun image. Forget the high priestess of domesticity; she's now Martha From the Block. She took Barbara Walters on a stroll down the humble street in Nutley, N.J., where she grew up as one of six children. "I had to get up really early to use the bathroom," Stewart said in front of the tiny bungalow the Kostyra family called home. She also brought her 89-year-old mother on "Larry King Live" to serve Polish babka, and wished her host happy new year--in Polish. King was swept up in Martha's makeover. "The Stewarts," he barked to close the show, then corrected himself. "No, the Kostyras."As hard as she tries to recast herself as Martha Kostyra of the people, Stewart remains the poster CEO for corporate scandals. When she makes her entrance at the federal courthouse in Manhattan Jan. 20, it will be scrutinized on a continuous cable loop. Sources close to the case tell NEWSWEEK there's a good chance...
  • DETROIT'S HOT BUTONS

    In a darkened room deep inside Ford Motor Co.'s top-secret design studios, Elizabeth Baron slides behind the wheel of the $140,000 GT sports car. She adjusts her seat and reaches for the stick shift. Suddenly, Baron can't move. "Adam," she shouts to another Ford engineer, "could you toggle me, please?" Adam reboots a laptop and Baron is once again free to move about the GT's cabin. But it's not a real GT, and Baron is not exactly herself, either. She's actually sitting in a crude wooden car seat, wearing virtual-reality goggles and gloves, with 11 sensors strapped to her body. The high-tech gear, known as Digital Occupant, transforms the slender 5-foot-6 woman into a beefy 6-foot-5 man shoehorned into this lowrider. In her goggles, she feels like Ralph Kramden struggling to work the GT controls. "It's a pretty tight cockpit," she says. "I don't have much room."Detroit is finding itself squeezed in a new way. After two decades of chasing Japanese automakers' superior car quality,...
  • A New Campus Crusader

    Growing up in Georgia, Mary Sue Coleman was caught in the school-desegregation battle. After the Supreme Court's landmark Brown v. Board of Education ruling in 1954, hard-line segregationists threatened to padlock public schools before they would admit black students. So Coleman's father moved his family north to Iowa. "My parents were very scared," recalls Coleman. "They wanted to go to a place where public schools were supported."Nearly 50 years later, Coleman is still in the thick of the fight. But this time, she's president of the University of Michigan and writing the rule book on how to foster diversity. Last June, Michigan won its own landmark case when the Supreme Court upheld its affirmative-action policy for admitting students to its law school. However, the court struck down Michigan's undergrad admissions process, which, unlike the law school, awarded extra points to minorities to give them an edge. So U-M drafted a new undergrad application--one that many other colleges...
  • Finbarr O'neill: Revving Up A New Machine

    Finbarr O'Neill left Hyundai to become the CEO of Mitsubishi's American operations A year ago, Finbarr O'Neill was the auto industry's most unlikely success story. A lawyer by training and an Irishman by birth, he engineered a turnaround of Korean carmaker Hyundai that would make Lee Iacocca proud. Thanks to O'Neill's canny marketing of a 10-year warranty, Hyundai went from a punchline to a powerhouse and now outsells Volkswagen and BMW in the United States. And O'Neill had visions of catching Honda and Toyota by the end of the decade. "You no longer have to explain to your neighbors why you bought a Hyundai," O'Neill triumphantly crowed to NEWSWEEK when we featured him in our 2003 Who's Next issue.Now O'Neill has some explaining of his own to do. He stunned the car business in September when he exited Hyundai to try to repair a car wreck over at Mitsubishi. A hot brand for Gen Y, Mitsubishi hit the skids this year after selling too many cars to kids with bad credit. As the...
  • Three For The Road

    Robert Baller is an American everyman. The earnest 40-year-old software engineer works out of his stucco-style home in suburban Sacramento, Calif. He has a wife, a 13-year-old daughter and an 80-pound Labrador. But inside his three-bay garage is nearly a hundred grand worth of heavy metal: a Honda Civic, a Toyota minivan and a racy Nissan 350Z. "The Z is our date car," he explains. That's fine, but isn't three cars for two drivers a bit much? "Some people might think it's excessive," says Baller, "but our friends haven't said anything."If they have, they're probably scheming to get a third car of their own. These days a driveway that looks like a car dealer's lot is fast becoming the new suburban status symbol. A recent study from the Department of Transportation has confirmed what a drive through any suburban neighborhood would suggest: cars now out-number licensed drivers in American households. Nearly three out of 10 American driveways today are jammed with three cars, up 27...
  • Sedan Begone

    When he's on the road selling banking software, Mark Oliver of Houston typically rents a Ford Taurus. But recently he took a ride on the wild side: he splurged on a 2004 Cadillac DeVille. He rationalized spending the $75 a day on the luxury car--almost twice the Taurus's price--because he was squiring around important banking clients. But after dropping them off, he cruised around Dallas, enjoying the Caddy's cushy leather seats and fiddling with its 101-channel satellite radio. "It's a great ride," he says. Now that he's spoiled, Oliver's eying a Volvo for his next business with clients.Road warriors are driving golden chariots. With business travel finally showing signs of life, rental companies are attempting to jump-start the bottom line by offering dream cars for hire. The pitch: impress your clients by showing up for the meeting in a hot car. Instead of the usual bland-mobiles, business travelers can now pick from Jags, Land Rovers, T-birds and sports cars like the Nissan Z....
  • Road Test: Ford F-150

    As I nosed the brawny Ford F-150 into a jammed parking lot before a Detroit Lions game, the attendant sighed. "It's getting harder and harder to fit big SUVs like yours in my lot," he griped. Of course, the F-150 isn't an SUV. It's a pickup truck. But you can't blame the attendant for being confused. Driving the smooth, startlingly quiet F-150, I felt as if I were behind the wheel of a Lincoln Navigator. The interior is a work of industrial art, with elliptical vents that open with mechanical precision and a dashboard that appears to be held in place by thick steel bands (though they're actually textured plastic). It's comfy, too: my football buddies had plenty of room in its two rows of seats. But as stylish as it is on the inside, the F-150 is studly on the outside. Unlike the previous curvy F-150 (read: girly), the new model is an alpha truck. The raised hood and massive grille snarl, while the bed seems bottomless now that its slab sides have been raised to 18-wheeler height....
  • A Rebel With A Car

    Behold, the Nissan Quest. Awash in the glow from four skylights, the Quest was inspired, oddly enough, by the airy, contemporary homes of Frank Lloyd Wright and Ludwig Mies van der Rohe. Pebble-grain leather seats suggest sofas in a SoHo loft. A cylindrical pod, which houses the gearshift and stereo, juts from the dash like a postmodern entertainment center. But this is no sleek luxury car. It's a minivan. And to Quest designer Alfonso Eduardo Albaisa's kids, it's a place to play house. "It's hard to get them out of it," he says.Albaisa is not your typical gearhead. He washed out of car-design school in Detroit in the '80s when he was told his quirky look (Napoleon jackets, bleached white hair) didn't fit Motown's buttoned-down culture. He found refuge at New York's Pratt Institute, where he indulged his passion for furniture and boat design. Albaisa also has architecture in his blood: his father, a Cuban refugee, designed Richard Nixon's Miami home. But he'd given up on cars when...
  • Road Test: Nissan Quest

    I realized there was something different about the Nissan Quest when I drove it to my daughter's Saturday-morning soccer game. As we tried to leave after the match, we were blocked by a crowd of curious moms. They loved its racy looks and wondered how it handled with a full load of soccer players (who piled in while their moms fired questions). The answer: this is one hot minivan. Its edgy styling is complemented by a muscular V-6. Inside, the Quest feels like a loft, with four skylights in the roof. My kids liked the third row of seats, which steps up for theater-style seating. The second and third rows fold flat--a minivan first. My only problem: the gauges are mounted in the center of the dash, requiring an awkward glance to check your speed. Where you'd normally find the speedometer is a clip to hold a family photo. Cute, but not convenient. Still, Nissan is out to prove that soccer moms can also be sexy moms.Tip: Go for the leather interior with the pebble texture (a $1,500...
  • Business's Killer I.O.U.

    With car sales surprisingly strong, J. T. Battenberg III, CEO of auto-parts maker Delphi Automotive, would like to expand his factories and hire some workers. But he can't. And it's not because his products aren't in demand--Delphi makes the DVD players and satellite radios that are becoming the next big things in cars. He first has to deal with an ugly blemish on his balance sheet--a $4.1 billion shortfall in Delphi's pension fund. Three years ago the pension plan was fully funded, but it cratered along with the stock market. To fill that hole, Battenberg is shoveling some $600 million a year--about half of Delphi's available cash--into the fund. "It's a huge millstone," he grumbles. "We are delaying our expansion plans because our board suddenly has half the amount of cash you would normally have."Delphi is not alone. Huge pension liabilities are strangling corporate America, and execs say this new debt is choking off an economic recovery. Companies that offer workers traditional...
  • The Competition: Zero Is A Gm Hero

    General Motors CEO Rick Wagoner is a pretty laid-back guy. But after Ford and Chrysler execs kept carping that GM was driving Detroit off a cliff with its zero percent financing deals, he decided he'd had enough. Defending the discounts at a conference last winter, Wagoner barked: "It's time to stop whining and just play the game."The problem for Ford and Chrysler is that the zero-sum game is proving deadly. GM is peddling the best deals in town--steep discounts averaging $4,370 per car--and hot models like the Hummer H2 and the Cadillac CTS. Because it's Detroit's low-cost producer, GM earns profits in a price war--and builds market share--as Ford and Chrysler lose ground and money.While Chrysler takes the high road, Ford is heading down the dirt road with a new F-150 pickup. It will be followed by a parade of new models, like an edgy Mustang and $150,000 GT racer. But if the pickup doesn't sell, nothing else matters.GM doesn't have a "bet the company" model coming. But it is...
  • Chrysler Shifts Gears

    Pity the poor Chrysler execs at the Frankfurt Motor Show this month. They traveled to Germany to show off their steroidal new 300C Hemi luxury sedan and wagon. But the press wanted to talk only about Chrysler's fall from the Big Three after being overtaken by Toyota in August. With microphones shoved in their faces, the Chrysler brass tried to beat back rumors of layoffs, salary cuts and even speculation about the company's demise. "Nobody ever claimed this would be an easy road," a weary Chrysler CEO Dieter Zetsche told NEWSWEEK during a brief break from the frenzy. At that very moment, back stateside, Toyota execs basked in a two-day lovefest with their dealers at a convention center in Philadelphia. Former president George H.W. Bush was on hand to congratulate them. Ruben and Clay, the "American Idol" duo, serenaded the crowd, too. And for the grand finale, Elton John gave a private concert of his greatest hits. A crowd favorite: "Don't Let the Sun Go Down on Me."Toyota's...
  • Road Test - Infiniti Fx45

    Sometimes a wheel is just a wheel. As I drove around in the Infiniti FX45, with its long nose and huge 20-inch wheels, reaction divided evenly along gender lines. Guys loved the racy SUV and were awed by those oversize wheels; women scoffed. Said one female: "A man designed this, right?" Of course, that means I really liked this car. With a 315-horsepower V-8 under toe, it drove and handled like the Nissan 350Z sports car. (And that's no coincidence, since the FX is built on the same chassis as the Z.) The broad-shouldered, swept-back look is a welcome departure from the wimpy egg shape of so many car-based SUVs. The FX's aggressive, angular lines do have drawbacks: big blind spots in the rear. And the techie aluminum interior is rather sterile (though I liked the bomber-jacket leather seats). Still, this macho cruiser could be Arnold's next SUV. Now, if only Infiniti can convert the glove box into a cigar humidor.Tip: For 10 grand less, the FX35 packs a 280hp V-6 and sports only...
  • The Price Of Darkness

    The Blackout's Toll On The Economy May Be Small And Short-Lived, Thanks To Resilient Consumers And Some Lucky Summer Timing
  • Road Test: Vw Touareg

    The worst thing about Volkswagen's new SUV is its name: Touareg (rhymes with "do-rag"). The company says it named its first SUV after a tribe of sub-Saharan nomads. Whatever. Once you climb inside this refined SUV, however, all is forgiven. On the highway, a nifty air suspension (a $2,300 option) lowers the Touareg for streamlining, or you can flip a switch and ride high for off-road. Though surprisingly surefooted, it lacks human-cargo capacity: there's no third row, and my kids gave the second row's middle seat a thumbs down. But the Touareg makes up for the tight interior with extra style--plenty of burled walnut, brushed aluminum and leather. That's why it's destined to become the hipster's SUV. Too bad about the name.Tip: To haul assets in this hefty Vee-Dub, opt for the burly V-8.
  • Road Test: 350Z Roadster

    Driving the new Nissan 350Z Roadster is like having your own rolling amusement park. When I brought home a "ticket me" red Z, the kids in the neighborhood lined up to go for a spin, and cruising with the top down elicited cries of "cool car." But the Z is more than just eye candy. Its beefy 287-horsepower V-6 engine lets out a chest-rattling roar with the slightest tap on the gas. I dare anyone to wind through its tight, six-speed manual transmission without breaking the law. My favorite maneuver: slamming it into second and squealing the tires. (Not that I would ever actually do anything like that, Officer.) Rube Goldberg would have loved the mechanical ballet that automatically folds the rag top beneath a racy cover behind the seats. There's very little not to like about this car. Sure, the cup holders are inconvenient and the trunk is laughably small. But who cares when you can hit the gas and carve turns like an Olympic skier?Tip: Forget the parade laps; open this baby up on the...
  • Bill Ford's Rainy Days

    As business trips go, this one should have been a pleasure for William Clay Ford Jr. The 46-year-old CEO of Ford Motor Co. has come to a political confab on Michigan's Mackinac Island (where, ironically, cars are outlawed) to speak about the company that great-granddad Henry Ford founded 100 years ago. But the evening before his talk, he's backed into a lace curtain in the governor's suite of Mackinac's Grand Hotel, graciously enduring the ritual of receiving admirers. There's Michigan's glamorous new governor, Jennifer Granholm, cooling her heels while Ford coos over a Detroit radio star's baby pictures. Waiting nearby is former senator Fred Thompson, now the gruff D.A. on NBC's "Law & Order," who's admiring a table of tiny white-chocolate Model T's. Most CEOs would revel in this adulation. Not Ford. After 90 minutes, he's had enough. He takes a pull from his water bottle, turns to a bystander and whispers: "How can I get out of here?"For Bill Ford, there is no escape. His...
  • Road Test: Pacifica

    So, is it a minivan, an SUV or just a plain old station wagon? In its new?Pacifica, billed as an upscale sport wagon, Chrysler has tried to capture the best characteristics of all three vehicles. But what I found in a week behind the wheel is that it comes up a little short: it really does serve as a set of luxury wheels, but leaves something to be desired as a family hauler. When my wife and I went out to dinner with another couple, we couldn't have been more comfortable in the roomy leather captain's chairs that make the car's first two rows feel like the first-class section of a 747. Our friends marveled at the nifty navigation screen embedded into the speedometer. The incredible surround-sound stereo made us feel as if John Mayer were playing live from the car's third row. We felt hip wrapped inside the Pacifica's rakish profile and we all enjoyed its smooth ride. Taking three kids to a soccer game the next day was another story, however. Piling them into the third row required...
  • Blondes: Trading Places

    The feds might still be hounding Martha Stewart, but Hollywood appears to have forgiven her. Lacking a real ending to the story, the producers of Monday's NBC biopic dreamed up a scene where adoring fans mob Stewart. "We decided that people in Middle America probably couldn't care less what's going on with her stock troubles," says executive producer Howard Braunstein. "People love her." The Feds aren't so easily charmed. Although Stewart's lawyers are trying to cut a deal for leniency, NEWSWEEK has learned that the U.S. attorney in Manhattan is still strongly considering indicting her for insider trading and obstruction of justice. The Feds have even contemplated going after Stewart on charges of manipulating the stock market by providing a bogus alibi to avoid tarnishing her company's image. Stewart, who declined to comment for this story, has long insisted she did nothing illegal by dumping $227,000 in ImClone stock a day before federal regulators rejected the company's cancer...
  • Cybill's Martha Moment

    As the Martha Stewart insider-trading scandal erupted last summer, Matt Lauer gave the "Today" show audience his picks for the perfect actors to play Martha in the made-for-TV biopic: Cybill Shepherd, Candice Bergen or Robin Williams. A friend of Shepherd's immediately called her and told her to pursue the part. Shepherd got her manager on the phone with the NBC brass that day. And now Matt Lauer's casting call will come to the small screen. On Monday, May 19, Shepherd will star as the domestic diva in "Martha, Inc.: The Martha Stewart Story" airing at 9 p.m. ET on NBC.Shepherd doesn't consider it typecasting, but she says she did draw on her own rage playing the famously temperamental Stewart. (The scene of her hurling a copper pot at her catering partner is particularly delicious.) Yet Shepherd also humanizes Martha, especially in a highly sympathetic ending that shows her being mobbed by adoring fans. (The producers had to dream up that scene--the real Martha story isn't over yet...
  • Out Of The Box Thinking

    Bob Cooper can't pass a Costco without stopping. The California wine connoisseur has filled his cellar with more than 1,000 bottles purchased off the wooden shipping pallets at the no-frills warehouse club. And he's not buying the cheap stuff. Pinot Bob, as his friends call him, favors full-bodied pinot noirs that can run $80 a bottle. And he buys them by the case. Last year alone, Cooper dropped $11,000 on wine at Costco. His says his wife is now trying to put him on "wine restriction." But it doesn't sound like it's taking. "When I find that key buy at Costco, my motto is 'clean 'em out'," he says. "You have to or somebody else will."Costco is overflowing with big spenders like Cooper. While most merchants struggle with the sluggish economy, Costco's cement aisles have shopping-cart gridlock. The big retailer has become America's No. 1 wine merchant and No. 3 grocer, and accounts for one fifth of sales on some best-selling books. Oh, and it's America's top seller of toilet paper-...
  • Road Test: Crossfire

    As I pulled up to a stoplight in a low-slung silver Chrysler Crossfire, a hulking black pickup beside me blasted its horn. For a minute I wondered what I had done to provoke such road rage. But when I looked over, the driver was sticking up his thumb, not his middle finger. The Crossfire, an elegant piece of art deco automotive sculpture, inspires that kind of emotional outburst. From its long, ribbed hood to its tapered boat tail, this coupe is a stunner. It conjures up a glamorous, bygone era of car styling--inside and out. The cockpit sports stylish chrome-rimmed gauges and hand-stitched leather seats. On the road, the Crossfire handles crisply, with a stiff European ride. That's no accident, since 40 percent of its parts are lifted from Chrysler's corporate sibling, Mercedes-Benz. The Crossfire also takes a cue from Porsche, with a rear spoiler that deploys at 60mph. But the Crossfire is no Porsche. Its 215-horsepower V6 is too tame for a car that looks fast standing at a...
  • Styling With Digital Clay

    Volvo chief designer Peter Horbury saw the inside of his own concept car for the first time at the Geneva Motor Show last month. In the past, Horbury would have had his hands all over one of his creations as it was coming to life in the studio. But the futuristic Volvo station wagon was designed in two places--Spain and Sweden. And Horbury was so busy overseeing the car's exterior at Volvo's headquarters, he didn't have time to troop down to Barcelona. Thanks to advanced software, Horbury could flip open a laptop and be in two places at once, fly-specking everything about the car's sleek aluminum and leather interior, even if he couldn't actually sit in it. "We knew here," Horbury says from his Goteborg office, "what was going on all the time in Barcelona."The car designer's studio, long a sanctuary of old-world craftsmanship, is going digital. In the first century of car design, da Vinci would have felt right at home. Start with a drawing, then sculpt a clay model, followed by wood...
  • Comeback, By Design

    Jimmy Parsons had no plans to buy a car when he accompanied a friend to a Nissan dealership last week. To Parsons, Nissan was always "kind of a joke, and boring." Then he got a load of the razor-sharp 350Z sports car in the showroom. "I thought of myself in that car and went, 'Wow!' " says Parsons, 38, who wheeled a $33,000 silver Z off the lot. "I don't really need more tickets, but I wanted that Z."If anyone should be pulled over for speeding, it's Nissan. Sputtering along a few years ago, the company has come roaring back by overhauling its lineup with racy automotive architecture. Ever since Renault took control in 1999, the Japanese automaker has reinvented itself by unleashing a blitz of 28 new models with a French eye for style. There's the arched roofline of the Maxima, with a soaring skylight suggesting an artist's loft. Then there's the quirky Quest minivan, with an orange interior and a shifter poking out of a center pod dash. And Nissan's cigar-nosed Infiniti G35 luxury...
  • Styling With Digital Clay

    Volvo chief designer Peter Horbury saw the inside of his own concept car for the first time at the Geneva Motor Show last month.IN THE PAST, Horbury would have had his hands all over one of his creations as it was coming to life in the studio. But the futuristic Volvo station wagon was designed in two places—Spain and Sweden. And Horbury was so busy overseeing the car’s exterior at Volvo’s headquarters, he didn’t have time to troop down to Barcelona. Thanks to advanced software, Horbury could flip open a laptop and be in two places at once, fly-specking everything about the car’s sleek aluminum and leather interior, even if he couldn’t actually sit in it. “We knew here,” Horbury says from his Goteborg office, “what was going on all the time in Barcelona.”The car designer’s studio, long a sanctuary of old-world craftsmanship, is going digital. In the first century of car design, da Vinci would have felt right at home. Start with a drawing, then sculpt a clay model, followed by wood...
  • Periscope

    HALLIBURTONCha-Ching CheneyThe stock market may be suffering, but Operation Iraqi Freedom has sure been good for business at Halliburton, the Houston oil-services company famous for its former CEO, Dick Cheney. And the vice president hasn't entirely severed his financial ties to the big Defense contractor. Even while Halliburton is scoring Army contracts that could top $2 billion, Cheney is still receiving annual compensation from the company he led from 1995 to August 2000, NEWSWEEK has learned.When Cheney stepped down from Halliburton to run for vice president, he sold his company stock and gave profits from his stock options to charity. But he still had more compensation coming. Rather than taking it in a lump-sum payment of about $800,000, Cheney opted for "deferred compensation," Wendy Hall of Halliburton tells NEWSWEEK. Cheney chose annual payments of "less than $180,000" from 2001 to 2005, says Hall, which offers a tax benefit. Cheney, through spokeswoman Cathie Martin,...