• FE18-Will-I-Am

    Interview With Will.i.am

    The 35-year-old formerly known as William Adams Jr. is now more ubiquitous than UGG boots and Red Bull combined. His next stop: the Super Bowl.
  • mariah-boyle-christmas-albums-wide

    How Christmas Saved the Music Industry

    Amid the deluge of holiday music that comes in November and December, Mariah Carey’s "Merry Christmas II You" and Susan Boyle’s "The Gift" are poised to make all those other seasonal crooners sound like off-key carolers.
  • Abu Dhabi: An Oil-financed Cultural Center?

    In 2007, Forbes named Abu Dhabi the wealthiest city in the world, and like nouveaux riches everywhere, it has gone on a bit of a spending spree. Local branches of the Louvre and Guggenheim museums are under construction. They'll join the Abu Dhabi Poetry Academy and the Arab Heritage Village, with exhibits on life in the Gulf centuries before the mall with the ski slope moved into the neighborhood. And then there's Zaha Hadid's swooping design for the five-theater Performing Arts Center, which will make the Sydney Opera House look like a grade-school auditorium. Aside from the sand that still occasionally blows across the modern cityscape, the Abu Dhabi of a few decades ago wouldn't recognize itself today. But the most impressive display of cultural pride—not to mention deep pockets—sits on the floor of the Sheikh Zayed Mosque. It is the world's largest prayer rug—60,546 square feet of vibrant wool, handmade in Iran. It is so dazzling, you almost don't notice the gold-leaf domes...
  • Are Married People More Selfish than Singles?

    Parents should think twice before pushing their children toward the altar. According to "Marriage: The Good, the Bad and the Greedy," a paper published by the American Sociological Association, married people are significantly less likely than the unmarried to visit their parents and siblings. Only 60 percent surveyed admitted contacting their parents in the past month, as compared with 80 percent of never-married respondents.Only 30 percent said they'd socialized with friends in the same period, in contrast to 70 percent of unmarrieds.The silver lining? Married couples are asking less of others: from 1985 to 2004, the number of people they confided in dropped by one third, while the amount of deep discussion with their spouses rose. Here's to wedded bliss—and isolation.

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