Mary Carmichael

Stories by Mary Carmichael

  • Health: Baby Food (For Mom)

    It's a safe bet that Dr. David Barker has never craved pickles and ice cream. Still, if there's one man in the world who understands the peculiar dietary needs of pregnant women, it's him. Barker rose to fame in the '90s as the main backer of "fetal programming," the idea that conditions in the womb, influenced by the mother's diet, can determine a baby's likelihood of chronic adult disease. Today the Barker Hypothesis is the subject of hundreds of studies--and one very comprehensive guidebook, "The Best Start in Life," just out in England and available at amazon.co.uk. On the surface, much of the advice in Barker's book seems obvious (there can't be a woman in the world who thinks eating nothing but rice cakes is good for a fetus--well, at least not outside of Hollywood). But some issues are more complex than they first seem. Dieting during pregnancy, or even a few months before conception, creates an in utero environment short on the nutrients a baby needs for organ growth. The...
  • Baby Food (For Mom)

    It's a safe bet that Dr. David Barker has never craved pickles and ice cream. Still, if there's one man in the world who understands the peculiar dietary needs of pregnant women, it's him. Barker rose to fame in the '90s as the main backer of "fetal programming," the idea that conditions in the womb, influenced by the mother's diet, can determine a baby's likelihood of chronic adult disease. Today the Barker Hypothesis is the subject of hundreds of studies--and one very comprehensive guidebook, "The Best Start in Life," just out in England and available at amazon.co.uk. On the surface, much of the advice in Barker's book seems obvious (there can't be a woman in the world who thinks eating nothing but rice cakes is good for a fetus--well, at least not outside of Hollywood). But some issues are more complex than they first seem. Dieting during pregnancy, or even a few months before conception, creates an in utero environment short on the nutrients a baby needs for organ growth. The...
  • Fifty Years Of Conquering Everest

    Fifty years ago this week, Sir Edmund Hillary went to Nepal on a mission to what was left of the unexplored world. Last Friday he returned. Flown to Katmandu for the anniversary festivities after spending a week with the family of Tenzing Norgay, his partner in conquest, an exhausted Hillary was wrapped in a blanket and spirited away from the 200-some Sherpas, admirers and reporters awaiting him at the airport. His 83-year-old body was too worn out for travel by plane, much less by foot. But his quest went on, in the form of four Sherpas and a one-armed climber named Gary Guller, who had reached Everest's summit an hour earlier. Thirty-five others had gotten there the day before, and by June, when the mountain closes for business, an estimated 400 people will have ascended to its peak--this year alone. Hillary will not be among them but his spirit undoubtedly will.
  • Medical Testing At Home

    Getting a medical self-diagnosis at home isn't exactly new--it began with the scale in ancient Egypt. But these days, you can check a lot more than your weight. Devices on the market and in the pipeline allow patients to monitor their cholesterol and glucose levels, find out if they have allergies and even test for serious diseases like hepatitis C and HIV. The explosion in home diagnostics has many doctors worried that patients will substitute self-testing for office-based medical care. That's not what the tests are for--they're intended to supplement, not replace, a doctor visit--and so far, the FDA has been loath to approve many self-test kits for that reason. But the tests that have made it to market keep getting better.HIVEven with HIV drugs keeping the symptoms of AIDS at bay, an HIV-positive diagnosis is devastating--and more so when it's given without proper medical and psychological counseling. So when scientists first floated the idea of a home test for HIV, doctors...
  • Periscope

    Trade: Happy TogetherAmericans have taken sledgehammers to Peugeots. Germans have boycotted McDonald's. The Iraq war may be over, but the transatlantic rancor it inspired has yet to fade. Washington has hinted at commercial punishment against France for opposing the war, while some French officials talk almost gleefully of how George W. Bush's behavior is turning the world away from the American model--in business as in all things. To counter the vitriol, Washington has launched a charm offensive to repair commercial ties to Europe. In Paris last week, U.S. Trade Representative Robert Zoellick reassured a group of worried French business leaders that there will be no trade sanctions and reminded everyone that transatlantic --trade has shot up to $1.5 trillion per year: "At the economic level, the United States and Europe are joined at the hip."Yes, the Bush administration appears to be rediscovering its financial friends in Europe. Last Monday, U.S. Under Secretary for Commerce...
  • Help From Far Away

    There isn't a soul in America who's more all-American than Alex. A bright, chatty college graduate, he has an encyclopedic knowledge of baseball and basketball. He loves "Friends," and if there's a Jerry Bruckheimer blockbuster in theaters, he's almost certainly seen it already. So it may seem odd that his employers recently put him through a 28-hour crash course on U.S. culture that covered some rather basic terrain--like the fact that New England is not a part of Britain. What red-blooded American wouldn't know that?Most would--but then, Alex isn't a red-blooded American. He's the alter ego of a 24-year-old Indian named Abhinav Alexander who follows sports and Hollywood only because acting like a typical U.S. resident is a big part of his job. "Alex" mans a credit-card customer-support line for Spectramind, an Indian-run outsourcing firm in New Delhi that pays young, sharp Indian grads to adopt American personas and drudge through back-office work for corporations on the other...
  • Science: Fountain Of Youth

    Four years ago, Audie Leventhal's daughters sat him down and explained to him, slowly, that they were smarter than he was. Typical teenage behavior, but Leventhal took them seriously. "It wasn't that I thought they were smarter," he says, laughing. "But I wondered, was I getting stupider?" Well, maybe. Leventhal, a neurobiologist, has just published research that leaves no doubt as to his intellect--but it does indicate that we're all, indeed, getting stupider with age. And for the first time it hints at why.
  • The Fat Factor

    Last year the American Cancer Society asked people to list strategies for preventing cancer. Only 1 percent said "lose weight." Let's hope the other 99 percent heard last week's news. A huge ACS study has definitively linked obesity to a higher risk of getting and dying from a long list of cancers, including some--like prostate, ovarian and pancreatic cancers--that hadn't previously been connected. (It seems only melanomas, pediatric cancers and tumors of the brain, lung and bladder aren't weight-related.)Exactly how obesity promotes tumor growth is unknown, but people with more fatty tissue do have higher levels of insulin and estrogen, which encourage cell division. Weight loss causes a drop in hormone levels, so it's extremely likely that it reduces cancer risk. To prove it, though, scientists would need to conduct another study using people who had successfully lost a lot of weight. The sad reason they haven't? "There aren't enough subjects," says lead author Jeanne Calle. For...
  • Economies On Empty

    By now, everyone knows the early signs of SARS are high fever and a dry cough. But there's a second set of symptoms: canceled business trips, the collapse of tourism and falling stock prices. SARS (and fear of the mysterious disease) has already infected economies in Asia and Canada. Now U.S. markets are starting to look a little sickly, too. Last week analysts here blamed SARS for both a domestic stock slump and the airline industry's most recent woes. That's got economists pondering the kinds of questions doctors usually worry about: how far will this contagion spread, and what will be its final toll?In Asia, where tourism can account for as much as 9 percent of a country's gross domestic product, companies and families alike are canceling travel plans and locals are staying home. Hotels and restaurants in Hong Kong and Singapore now regularly go more than half empty, if they're open at all; analysts estimate that more than 40 percent of China's annual $67 billion in tourism...
  • Ask Tip Sheet

    Are mildew and mold different things?--RUTH ETZEL, ANCHORAGE, ALASKAThat depends on what you mean by "mildew." As a technical term, "mildew" refers to a type of crop disease. But for most people, "it's just slang for shower grunge," says environmental microbiologist Linda Stetzenbach. The nasty gray stuff in tile grout is usually a mixture of soap, skin cells, hair, yeast and--yep--some mold, a.k.a. fungi imperfecti. Unlike the toxic house-infesting mold blamed for ailments, shower grunge probably isn't dangerous to healthy people, since there's so little actual mold in it. Then again, Lysol isn't dangerous either, folks.
  • Calls That Follow You Anywhere

    It's one of the most maddening features of all the technology in our lives. There are so many gadgets to connect us--cell phones, e-mail, land-line phones--yet most of the gadgets aren't connected to each other.Verizon's answer is the new Digital Companion service, which marries Caller ID, Call Forwarding and the Web. The result: no matter how you try to reach some-one, you'll likely get through. The system, launching in phases throughout the year, revolves around private Verizon Web sites that track phone calls in real time and allow users to decide, with one click, which calls should be routed to which phone as they come in. It also includes a phone service that reads out the contents of e-mail. Say you're a working mother, and your son's school is trying to call you at home (where, naturally, you aren't). With Digital Companion, an instant message pops up on your office computer with the school's Caller ID, and with one click you can forward the call to your office. If you miss...
  • Discoveries: They're In The Genes

    James Watson is having one heck of a month. On April 2 he celebrated the 50th anniversary of the Nature article in which he and Francis Crick revealed the structure of DNA to the world. Then, 16 labs joined this week to release the full results of his other opus, the Human Genome Project. Wait a minute, you say, didn't they already do that? Sort of. The sequence announced Monday is far more complete, with only 300 gaps, compared with 30,000 in the June 2000 version. Now we have to figure out what it all means. With most of the holes filled in, scientists are expected to lay out a plan for forthcoming research at a two-day symposium following the announcement, starring none other than Watson, the project's chief proponent. The proposed studies, according to a paper in this week's Nature, will focus on how genes interact with proteins, influence behavior and vary between populations. The hope is that the research will usher in new medical treatments and a better understanding of the...
  • Calls That Follow You Anywhere

    It’s one of the most maddening features of all the technology in our lives. There are so many gadgets to connect us—cell phones, e-mail, land-line phones—yet most of the gadgets aren’t connected to each other.VERIZON’S ANSWER IS THE NEW Digital Companion service, which marries Caller ID, Call Forwarding and the Web. The result: no matter how you try to reach some-one, you’ll likely get through. The system, launching in phases throughout the year, revolves around private Verizon Web sites that track phone calls in real time and allow users to decide, with one click, which calls should be routed to which phone as they come in. It also includes a phone service that reads out the contents of e-mail. Say you’re a working mother, and your son’s school is trying to call you at home (where, naturally, you aren’t). With Digital Companion, an instant message pops up on your office computer with the school’s Caller ID, and with one click you can forward the call to your office. If you miss the...
  • Science: Roadkill In The Classroom? Oh, Deer.

    There are many ways to describe the new science curriculum at Hayden Valley Elementary School: "educational," for instance, or "eco-conscious." Or "ewww." Hayden, a tiny outpost in the Colorado woods, is home to a rich diversity of wildlife, much of which ends up dead on the side of the local stretch of U.S. Highway 40. This year, second and fourth graders have started keeping tabs on the ex-animals, mapping their locations with GIS technology. The program, called Critter Control, plays on kids' fascination with the grody, but it's real science--after five years, they'll have enough data to recommend new places for animal-crossing signs and culverts to the Colorado Division of Wildlife.Teachers Barb Paulekas and Laura LeBrun expected parents to be put off by the idea. But Hayden is a hunting town, and dead animals "are a way of life" there, Paulekas notes. Most folks embraced Critter Control. Heck, some parents even participated: "One night, my dad actually made the roadkill," says...
  • Take Botox And Call Me In The A.M.

    If a salesman told you a single drug could cure headaches, obesity, sore muscles and even body odor, all for the low, low price of $300, you'd probably think he was selling snake oil. But many scientists now say there's a drug that does all that and more--and believe it or not, it's Botox. The poison that erases wrinkles may be an effective therapy for many of life's other bodily indignities. Doctors are administering it for a wide range of ailments it isn't approved for (yet). "People said using Botox off-label would be a waste of time," says New York ear, nose and throat doctor Andrew Blitzer. "But a lot more patients are going to benefit."The most promising new use for Botox is headache treatment. It's unclear how Botulinum toxin soothes an aching brain--it may inhibit the nerves that transmit pain--but large studies confirm that people get fewer headaches after being Botoxed. Blitzer cites a patient whose migraines kept her from work four days a month, despite conventional drug...
  • In Sync

    Steven Strogatz has just written a book arguing that the universe is an orderly place marked by harmony and cooperation. In an era of war, terror and chaos, his viewpoint sounds a bit curious. But if "Sync: The Emerging Science of Spontaneous Order" is, well, out of sync with global news, it's certainly in tune with the scientific world. Human affairs may be disorderly, but the rest of nature is humming along just fine, thanks to intrinsic properties that emphasize teamwork and synchrony from the atomic level up.Anyone who's seen the aquatic ballet of schooling fish knows that nature provides glorious examples of synchrony--the rhythmic interplay of parts that unconsciously combine in patterns to make up a greater whole. But advanced computing and sophisticated math have shown recently that sync also underlies some of the most complex and perplexing phenomena around--from fads and traffic to human consciousness. Sync is embedded in the rules of nature, rules we've never been able to...
  • Ask Tip Sheet

    Claritin is Claritin, no matter how you get it. But now that the drug's patent has expired, its maker, Schering-Plough, is touting another prescription drug, Clarinex, to replace it. The company says it's better for indoor allergies. Many doctors, however, think it's merely better for Schering-Plough--Clarinex is a breakdown product of Claritin. Prescription drugs cost more; the old Claritin raked in $2.3 billion a year, but OTC it may earn $500 million. That's one reason it's OTC now--insurers got tired of paying billions and sued.
  • Health: Botox's Bad Side

    Nine months after its rollout across the United States, Botox is making headlines again--and this time the news ain't pretty. Sure, Botox gets rid of those lines between your brows. But patients say new wrinkles show up in other places. It's more than a matter of contrast: according to a recent paper in Cosmetic Dermatology, Botoxed beauties may work previously unused muscle areas while trying to frown, unwittingly giving themselves new wrinkles. The article's author, David Becker, avoids the new lines in his patients by using a lighter dose to weaken, not freeze, the muscles. "But most patients don't want that," says dermatologist Lisa Donofrio. Unless those wrinkles are low on the brow--the one area most doctors find too risky to treat--you can always plop down cash for more injections. So don't expect Botox use to go down any time soon--it may actually go up.
  • Health: Botox's Bad Side

    Nine months after its nationwide roll-out, Botox is making headlines again--and this time the news ain't pretty. Sure, Botox gets rid of those lines between your brows. But patients say new wrinkles show up in other places. It's more than a matter of contrast: according to a recent paper in Cosmetic Dermatology, Botoxed beauties may work previously unused muscle areas while trying to frown, unwittingly giving themselves new wrinkles. The article's author, David Becker, avoids the new lines in his patients by using a lighter dose to weaken, not freeze, the muscles. "But most patients don't want that," says dermatologist Lisa Donofrio. Unless those new wrinkles are low on the brow--the one area most doctors find too risky to treat--you can always plop down cash for more injections. So don't expect Botox use to go down any time soon--it may actually go up.
  • Health: Use Rmr, Lose Lbs

    It's just not fair. Here you are on the treadmill with yet another futile New Year's resolution to lose weight, and your skinny friend is snarfing down brownies. What's she got that you don't? Try good genes--and a high resting metabolic rate, which makes her body burn calories faster. At least now there's something you can do about it. A small group of health providers and gyms, including the nationwide chain Bally Total Fitness, is offering sessions with a new inhaler-like device that measures your RMR--the number of calories you burn per day--faster than you can say "Atkins diet." Breathe into the BodyGem for a few minutes, get your magic number, eat fewer calories than that number and you're on the way to weight loss. Exercise will increase your RMR, so you'll need to use the BodyGem to track it. That kind of plan wasn't practical before; the physician-only RMR measuring equipment was too cumbersome. Now the only drawback is that you'll look ridiculous breathing into the device....
  • Rx: Two Martinis A Day

    Just when you've gotten over your New Year's Eve hangover, there might be a good reason to belly up to the bar again--with your doctor's blessing. A study published last week in The New England Journal of Medicine found that regular, moderate consumption of beer, wine and even hard liquor might actually be good for you. The 12-year study, conducted by researchers at Harvard, followed almost 40,000 men and found that those who drank a glass or two, three to seven times a week, cut their risk of a heart attack by a third.This isn't the first time scientists have found health benefits from alcohol. Way back in 1974, Arthur Klatsky, now a senior cardiology consultant with Kaiser Permanente, stumbled across evidence that drinkers were less likely to have heart attacks. "That was before we even had a biological explanation," says Klatsky. "Since then, there have been literally dozens of studies." Many have shown the benefits of drinking wine--both red and white--partially because it's...
  • Magazines: A Smart (-Alecky) Read

    Ah, college. Where else but in lectures and late-night bull sessions could you spend hours pondering the mysteries of the universe, the wonders of civilization, the truth about Pop Rocks and soda? Well, there's Mental Floss. The year-old magazine is a lot like that professor of yours who peppered his tests with raunchy jokes: it makes learning fun. The current issue, for instance, reveals that "unlike people," stars get hotter as they age. Oh, and Pop Rocks and soda won't kill you.The original five Mental Floss staffers had no journalistic experience, except for one kid who'd worked on his high-school newspaper. Now they run a bimonthly with 10,000 subscribers and a newsstand presence of 50,000 copies. Sixty percent of those get sold, an almost unheard-of statistic for new magazines. Recently the staff has inked deals for a book series, a board game, radio spots and a syndicated column. "We haven't spent a dime on marketing," says cofounder Will Pearson. "We still don't know why it...
  • The Bloom Is Off The Rose

    No one ever expects Axl Rose to show up on time for his concerts. He likes to keep the fans waiting. He sings about it in "Mr. Brownstone," one of the sleazier hits from Guns N' Roses' debut album, "Appetite for Destruction": Show usually starts around 7 / We go on stage around 9.True to form, two weeks ago in Albany, N.Y., a Guns N' Roses show was starting at 7 p.m. Then it was 9. Then it was 10, and Axl was nowhere in sight, maybe not even in the building. One of the cameramen distracted the crowd by training his camera on girls in the audience, egging them on to bare their breasts. But this didn't keep people's attention for long. It was 10:45 p.m. Axl had ditched the "Chinese Democracy" tour's kickoff date in Vancouver a few weeks earlier. It looked like he was ditching this show, too.And then the lights went down. There he was, Axl Rose backed up by a battalion of new musicians, wearing braids and a baggy jersey and screeching the opening of "Welcome to the Jungle" like it was...
  • Medicine: Not A Cure For Cancer, But Close

    Cervical cancer has never triggered the kind of fears American women reserve for breast cancer--largely because annual Pap smears can detect most precancerous cells in the cervix. But human papillomavirus (HPV)--a sexually transmitted disease that causes genital warts in both sexes and also causes most cases of cervical cancer if left untreated--is still a plague in this country. Doctors estimate that half (yes, half) of Americans have been exposed. And in the developing world, cervical cancer caused by HPV terrorizes women who don't have the benefit of regular testing, killing more than 200,000 every year. So the development of a vaccine against HPV--the culmination of two decades of research, announced last week in The New England Journal of Medicine--is a major advance.For the vaccine to fulfill its promise, the next five years may be just as crucial as the last 20. Merck plans to bring it to market by 2007. The pharmaceutical giant will need to conduct more tests to ensure...
  • Ginkgo On Your Mind?

    Memory aids based on Ginkgo biloba, a Chinese plant that is the oldest living tree species on earth, have been used in China for centuries. Americans now spend more than $240 million each year on gingko-based remedies, hoping to sustain strong memories in their own old age. But do the supplements work? Though ginkgo is one of the most thoroughly examined remedies in complementary medicine, the verdict isn't in yet. The latest study, published in August in The Journal of the American Medical Association, suggested that ginkgo doesn't help healthy people. When given routine mental tasks, such as memorizing a shopping list, healthy seniors who took ginkgo capsules performed no better than those given decoy pills. But another recent study found that Alzheimer's patients declined more slowly while taking ginkgo than patients who were treated with placebos. And other research has found that ginkgo, which thins the blood, can reduce tinnitus (ringing in the ears).A six-year trial started...
  • Ask Tip Sheet

    The body likes to keep the blood's ratio of salt to fluid constant, so when too much salt gets into the bloodstream, it reacts by raising fluid levels. The heart has to work harder to push all that blood through bulging arteries. Some people are genetically more "salt sensitive" than others, but we all need to watch our salt consumption. Last week the American Public Health Association asked restaurants to halve the amount of sodium in their food by 2012. The APHA estimates the move could save 150,000 lives a year.
  • Your Next...

    Eco-Friendly FashionKarin Carter's clothes are trashy. We mean that as a compliment. Her "sustainable fashion," in the form of a leathery, waterproof fabric made from recycled plastic grocery bags, is poised to bring environmentalism to the runway. Carter, who invented the fabric, has already made a line of colorful purses and rain gear and hopes to extend the idea to lampshades, shower curtains and umbrellas. She's also transformed packing peanuts into insulation for a parka that doubles as a sleeping bag. Eco-conscious campers, take note.Hi, I'm Your Name TagStill stuck on those "Hi! I'm [your name, scrawled with a Sharpie]" name tags? The creators of N-Tag have a different idea: "smart" name tags. Based on MIT Media Lab technology, the clip-ons store info about the wearer's interests ("I'm looking for a zillionaire to invest in a hot company") and use infrared sensing to read other tags. When two tags discover a matching interest, a small screen displays the info ("I don't have...
  • The Tough Critics Speak

    Is the new Harry Potter movie better than the first one? When Harry hugs Hermione in the preview, is it the start of something icky, like flirting? And why is Dobby the House Elf so ugly? These are the questions occupying the minds of the nation's children--or at least those children who haven't been listening to playground chatter in New York and Los Angeles, where the few lucky kids who've seen advance media screenings of "Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets" are already doling out the answers. (For the record: said answers are "yes," "no" and "who you callin' ugly?") It seems the kids aren't worried about spoilers. "I thought my friends wouldn't want me to tell them anything," says Regina Sobel, 13. "But they were, like, 'Tell me everything!' "Here at NEWSWEEK we were, like, the same way. Last year we talked to dozens of kids who loved the first Potter movie, critics be darned. The follow-up may be an even bigger hit. Most of the kids we talked to this year preferred the new ...
  • Health | Pearly Whites

    If you want to whiten your teeth, you've got plenty of options--dentist Richard Price says to pick the right one, "you'll need a Ph.D." Or at least this chart.WHITESTRIPSFlexible and coated with bleaching gel, Crest's strips really do remove stains in two weeks. The gel tastes gross, but the price is pretty appetizing. $39.99WHITENING TOOTHPASTEThe cheapest choice, toothpastes are also the least effective--they scrub away only surface stains, much like a regular dental cleaning. "I've had patients tell me they don't work," says Price. At least they're convenient. $4.99LIGHT EXPOSURELasers are a thing of the past. BriteSmile and Zoom! use gentler lights to bleach teeth in an hour. But expect some temporary tooth sensitivity. $600CUSTOM TRAYSUse gel at home for two weeks. Not pain-free, but "itty-bitty night guards" are easier on gums than light treatment, says dentist Jason Psillakis. $300
  • Medicine: Codes Of Help

    To most nurses, a "code" is what happens when a patient's vital signs dip into the dangerous range. To the nurses at New York Methodist Hospital in Brooklyn, it's what keeps that from happening in the first place. In a move designed to cut down on medical errors, which claim more than 40,000 lives each year nationwide, the hospital is trying out a new system called Horizon Outlook that uses bar-code scanners--yes, the same thing cashiers use in grocery stores--to make sure the right patients are getting the right doses of drugs. The FDA has already started pushing for heavier bar-code labeling on individual bottles and packets of drugs. But since a third of hospital errors occur when IV pumps are programmed incorrectly--a problem that wouldn't be entirely solved by the FDA's proposal--the new system takes the concept further by automating the programming process. Prescription labels generated in the hospital pharmacy are stuck to IV bags. Nurses scan bar codes on the labels to make...
  • Health: It Stinks

    Garlic is often touted as a superfood--it has a rep for lowering cholesterol and preventing colds. Problem is, garlic reeks. Odorless pills containing allicin--a compound in garlic that at high levels may clear the arteries--were supposed to solve the smell, but a report released last week suggests that many are useless. ConsumerLab tested 14 garlic supplements and found that half of them didn't contain enough allicin to have even a chance of working. Looks like you'll have to smell bad to feel good.
  • In The News: It Just Stinks

    Garlic is often touted as a superfood--and indeed, what other pantry staple has a reputation for lowering cholesterol, preventing colds and adding zing to buttery bread? Then again, garlic reeks. Odorless pills were supposed to solve that, but a report released last week suggests that many are as effective at warding off heart disease as they are at, say, keeping vampires at bay. Garlic contains the compound allicin, which at high levels--3,000 micrograms or more--may clear the arteries. ConsumerLab, a firm that regularly debunks supplement makers' claims, tested 14 garlic supplements and found that half of them contained less than 3,000 micrograms, including Jamieson Laboratories', which was advertised as "allicin rich." Seven brands, like Garlinase 2000 and Nutrilite, really were allicin-rich. But while numerous studies have shown that garlic lowers cholesterol, scientists still aren't sure whether it's allicin or something else in garlic that has health benefits. If it's...