Melinda Liu

Stories by Melinda Liu

  • Psychological Warfare

    Retired Gen. Bariali Sabir's body is as disfigured as the Afghan landscape. Today the 53-year-old Army man, who lost his job under the Taliban, is back in Kabul's Military Hospital complaining of severe arthritis from decade-old bullet wounds. But Sabir's spirit is in just as much need of doctoring. "Sometimes I fly into a rage and can't recognize my family members," he says. "I've beaten them countless times. I fear I'm losing my mind." One of his four sons, a shy, freckle-faced 10-year-old named Abid, confirms that his father has often attacked family members. "About a month ago I wanted to ask my father a question, and he just hit me. He didn't even know I was his son," says Abid softly, with no apparent rancor. "I'm afraid of my father day and night."Even as Afghanistan tries to piece its politics back together, the country faces one of the worst mental-health crises in the world. As a recent World Health Organization report puts it, "Twenty-three years of war have ravaged......
  • Bin Laden: Where Is He Now?

    Some Al Qaeda fighters say they saw Osama bin Laden in Tora Bora as recently as two days ago. But anti-Taliban Afghan commanders like Haji Mohammed Zaman Ghamsharik believes bin Laden and his top aides have fled Afghanistan--perhaps while his supporters used last week's cease-fire negotiations as a diversion to assist the holdouts holed up in the cave complex here. "The Al Qaeda talked about surrender because they only wanted to buy more time for themselves," Zaman told NEWSWEEK.Their tactics may have had at least a partial payoff. An intense U.S. bombing campaign as well as commando operations by Afghans and American special forces troops left more than 200 Arab, Chechen, and Pakistani Al Qaeda fighters dead and at least 25 captured at the weekend, says Hazrat Ali, security chief of Nangrahar Province. But bin Laden's whereabouts are still unknown--and hundreds more Al Qaeda fighters may have escaped too. According to the Pentagon, an estimated 1,000 to 2,000 Al Qaeda forces were...
  • 'Now I See The Sunlight'

    Safia Tukhi just laughed when she was asked about her reaction to the rout of the Taliban, then pulled a plastic bag from her purse. Giggling and babbling, Safia grabbed a handful of confetti--made out of Mylar sparkles and paper-punch holes--and joyfully sprinkled the glittering motes all over a startled NEWSWEEK correspondent. Next to her stood her daughter, 22-year-old Masuda, who proudly exposed her face on a main street in Kabul on Saturday. She told how much she hated the all-enveloping burqa under which the ruling Taliban had required virtually all women to hide. "It gave me headaches," she said. Masuda had another reason to smile: she has begun writing poetry again after a five-year hiatus, and was eagerly anticipating that her paean to Kabul's liberation would be read on the city's newly unmuzzled radio station that day.The politics of post-Taliban Afghanistan still need to be sorted out. And many of the mujahedin fighters who sent the Taliban running are almost as devout...
  • Letter From Kabul, Part 2: Tv Hunting

    We first learned that hundreds of U.S. Marines had landed in Kandahar by watching the BBC news on TV. That's not as simple as it sounds. For five years, Afghanistan was a television-free society in which the repressive Taliban had outlawed TV, music, dancing, singing and human imagery. Since Afghans are among the world's craftiest entrepreneurs, this simply meant television went underground.Now, with the Taliban gone, everyone's openly buying televisions. More than 150 cottage-industry satellite-dish shops have mushroomed all over the city (there used to be just five). Their newly hand-made parabolas line entire Kabul streets, luring would-be buyers. The sight is especially exotic given that the dishes are fabricated out of beer-can metal already stamped with multi-colored logos such as "Coors" and "Molson Ice."We--that is, NEWSWEEK's five correspondents and photographers in Kabul--have our own reasons for wanting a piece of this small cultural revolution. After moving into a...
  • A Respite From The War

    When Shirazuddin Siddiqi first heard about the attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, he figured his radio program "New Home, New Life" was finished. Broadcast to Afghans by the BBC since 1994, the program mixes comedy, drama and farming tips in a soap opera about village life. It's wildly popular both in Afghanistan and in Pakistani refugee camps, where nearly 2 million Afghans live. But September 11 made Siddiqi, the director, reconsider its purpose. During a car ride, he began thinking about how his own relatives fled the Afghan civil war in 1992. First his family sought refuge in an abandoned building, narrowly missing two land mines. Then his 4-year-old son died of malaria. "I thought, 'That's our role now: using our own personal experiences to help people through this crisis,' " he says.The new story lines reflect that approach. In one, an unfamiliar woman suddenly materializes in a village, asking a local resident for food and water. She's fled her home fearing...
  • Destination: Kabul

    Getting across the border turned out to be the easy part. I drove into Afghanistan two days ago, part of a long, snaking convoy organized by representatives of exiled anti-Taliban commanders based in the Pakistan city of Peshawar. Our procession included a motley assortment of land cruisers, mini-buses and some private cars that tagged along. Nobody even checked our papers. That changed when we arrived in Jalalabad, the first city on the road to Kabul.Our trip to Jalalabad took about 10 hours. Half of that was spent waiting to leave Pakistan; the other half was spent on a road that passed through the historic Khyber Pass--still adorned with British-style messages like "THE KHYBER RIFLES WELCOMES YOU." The city itself, though, was less welcoming. Taken from the Taliban just three days ago, several Northern Alliance commanders are now competing for control of the eastern outpost and the city was tense, full of heavily-armed men.Our convoy broke up there, and--dressed in a head-to-toe...
  • Burning Their Burqas

    The Northern Alliance continued its push into Taliban-controlled Afghanistan, claiming Monday that its fighters had seized Herat, the biggest city in the west of the country, and were waiting to enter the capital. "Our troops are knocking at the doors of Kabul," Ashraf Nadeem told Reuters by satellite phone from the northern city of Mazar-e Sharif.Nadeem's comments came after a weekend in which officials of Afghanistan's Northern Alliance claimed they had followed up on Friday's capture of Mazar-e Sharif with lightning-fast advances to the north, east and west of city, gaining control of nearly the entire region north of the Hindu Kush mountain range. The spokesmen said on Saturday that they had secured border crossings with Uzbekistan and Tajikistan, and were on the verge of linking up with Alliance forces in the northeast of the country, and on the Kabul front to the southeast.Their claims were unconfirmed by either U.S. or independent sources, but if true, they signify a dramatic...
  • Weapons And Warriors

    Palawan is proudly brandishing a nifty folding-stock machine pistol. "This is good for personal security," the weapons dealer assures visitors to Pakistan's notorious arms bazaar in Dara Adamkhel. It's also good, he adds, "for holy war, even for shooting in the air during wedding ceremonies."As his 7-year-old son helpfully packages shotgun shells into cardboard boxes, Palawan says his sales of AK-47 assault rifles have mushroomed 75 percent in just a few days. "God willing, our business is getting better and better."These are boom times for the 90,000 residents of this hardscrabble frontier town that has been churning out rifles, explosives and ammunition for more than a century. The arms trade here in Dara got its start in 1897 when British colonial rulers decided that allowing local Pashtun tribesmen to make their own substandard weapons was preferable to having them steal top-quality British ones. In return, the tribesmen agreed not to shoot at Britons traveling along main...
  • Inside 'People Smuggling'

    Using airstrikes and commando raids, Washington aims to pin down Al Qaeda terrorists in Afghanistan and then smoke them out. Better hurry. In the past two months between 150 and 200 Arab "holy warriors"--from Osama bin Laden's core following--have slipped out of Afghanistan through illegal channels, according to smugglers in Pakistan. Underworld "travel agents," as they like to be called, told NEWSWEEK that Al Qaeda operatives are now moving through Tajikistan or Uzbekistan to Ukraine--hoping ultimately to find their way to Britain or Germany. "Each Arab fighter has paid between $20,000 and $30,000 to be smuggled out of Afghanistan," says an agent in Peshawar who uses the pseudonym Fekrat.People-smuggling worldwide is a $4 billion-a-year industry, nearly as profitable as drug and arms trafficking. And no country has a deeper history of smuggling of all sorts than Afghanistan. Contraband televisions, gasoline, opium, AK-47s, as well as illegal migrants: all are ferried along remote...
  • All Papers In Order

    How easy is it to make oneself over into a desperate Afghan refugee who deserves asylum in the West? Thousands of Pakistanis, Iranians, Central Asians and other Muslims have done it. Last week I did it, too. First I found one of the dozens of underground "travel agents" in Peshawar who specialize in smuggling illegal immigrants. Through him I arranged passport photos of me looking vaguely Afghan. The ruling Taliban militia, adhering to Islamic-fundamentalist customs, bars photographs showing human images. But as a practical matter, a travel document showing a woman covered from head to ankle in a burqa does not pass muster at any immigration counter, so the Taliban makes exceptions for passport photographs.At a dingy studio in the labyrinthine Kissakhani market--literally "the bazaar of the storytellers"--I sat for portraits dressed in a loose-fitting Pakistani outfit with a dupatta, or shawl, over my hair. "Don't smile," advised an acquaintance. "Nobody smiles in Afghanistan." For...
  • Warlords: For Sale Or Rent

    Abdul Haq was, as an earlier generation of diplomats and spymasters might have put it, "our kind of warlord." The scion of an Afghan upper-class family, he organized underground resistance in Kabul against Soviet domination during the 1980s. At a White House reception in 1985, President Ronald Reagan toasted Haq as "one of the bravest commanders who led the Afghan freedom fighters." After the Soviets were driven out, Haq denounced Islamic extremism and came out in favor of educating women. He spoke perfect English, drank Diet Cokes and could lucidly discuss strategy. Forsaking his lucrative import-export business in Dubai, he had gone to Pakistan in September to try to entice other warlords away from the ruling Taliban to form a "peace coalition." On Oct. 21 he slipped across the border into Afghanistan, reportedly with a bundle of U.S. dollars.It took the Taliban all of five days to track down Haq, try him in a two-hour kangaroo court and execute him as a spy. Journalists widely...
  • The Great Escape

    Using airstrikes and commando raids, the United States says it's hoping to pin down Al Qaeda terrorists in Afghanistan. It had better hurry. In the past two months, according to people-smugglers in Pakistan, between 150 and 200 of the so-called Arab mujahedin who are Osama bin Laden's crack troops slipped out of Afghanistan through illegal channels. They say several Al Qaeda elements are currently traveling through Tajikistan or Uzbekistan to Ukraine-hoping eventually to arrive in Britain or Germany. "Each Arab fighter has paid between $20,000 and $30,000 to be smuggled out of Afghanistan," a professional people-smuggler in Peshawar, who uses the pseudonym Fekrat, told NEWSWEEK. "I've been trying to get ordinary Afghans and Pakistanis out the same way--but no one here can afford the trip."Worldwide, the trafficking of illegal migrants is a $4 billion-a-year industry, nearly as profitable as drug and arms smuggling. But for decades the problem has languished far down on the food...
  • An Afghan Defector's Story

    Even a secret terror network needs a means of transportation. Major Mohammad, an Afghan helicopter pilot, says that up to a few weeks ago he flew foreign terrorists and "holy warriors" in and out of the Kandahar region of Afghanistan in his 24-seat Mi-8T chopper. For half a decade his passengers included Arabs, Chechens, Uzbeks, Pakistanis and Tajiks--and occasionally Taliban leaders like Mullah Mohammed Omar. He was strictly forbidden to talk with them. Still, Mohammad (not his real name) knew they were headed for Taliban and Al Qaeda training facilities. He told NEWSWEEK last week that the Taliban and Osama bin Laden were linked "like head and body, all riding around in black cars and not allowing anyone to talk to them."By Mohammad's account, much has changed since it became clear the United States would attack. Al Qaeda's nerve center in Afghanistan is in disarray, suggesting that if the terror network is to continue to be a threat, it may be up to its "sleeper" cells worldwide....
  • 'I'm Sick And Tired Of Bloodshed'

    Legendary Afghan commander Abdul Haq, who was killed by a Taliban executioner last week, had seen his share of danger. Haq had been wounded more than a dozen times in battles against Soviet invaders, and lost his right foot after stepping on a land mine in 1987. Three years ago, his wife, 11-year-old son and a bodyguard died at the hands of mysterious assassins. He had been the most Western-friendly of Afghanistan's "Magnificent Seven"--the seven original mujahedin leaders who fought the Russians from 1979 to 1989. For much of the past decade he had lived in exile in Dubai. But when the Pakistan government reversed its pro-Taliban policies and threw its support behind the U.S.-led anti-terrorist coalition, Haq quickly came home to Peshawar to prepare for a regime change in Kabul.Little more than a week before his ill-fated "peace mission" into Afghanistan, which ended in his capture and death, Haq spoke to NEWSWEEK's Melinda Liu at his home. Excerpts:Abdul Haq: After the mujahedin...
  • Holy War On The Web

    The Muslim militants engaged in a blood feud with Christians in Indonesia's fabled Spice Islands arm themselves with spears and machetes. But their leaders are literate, media-savvy--and wired. The Laskar Jihad, a Java-based group that claims to have raised 15,000 fighters across Indonesia, has also put together an impressive media operation that includes daily, weekly, biweekly and monthly publications, as well as a radio network and Web site. Leaders claim that they receive up to 2,500 hits a day from surfers looking to chat with like-minded Muslims, send donations or download nifty mujahedin screensavers with a logo of two crossed scimitars and the motto ready to die.Such details may sound amusing--more of the trivia that thrives in the undiscriminating chaos of the Web--but few people are laughing anymore. Many of the young men who make up the bulk of Islamic militants also fit into the demographic that tends to be the most wired globally. Most Laskar Jihad members are between...
  • China: Trouble In Shangri-La

    The weary Tibetan monks were panhandling a long way from home. In desolate Qinghai province several weeks ago, they sadly displayed ID cards and photographs from the Buddhist community at Sertar in Sichuan province, a 35-hour bus ride away. They had fled the enclave in mid-July following a crackdown in which Chinese authorities demolished more than 1,000 dwellings in a bid to drive devotees away. "We have no school, no homes and no money. I don't know what we're going to do," one tired-looking monk dressed in ragged maroon robes told NEWSWEEK.When George W. Bush visits China next month, he'll be a long way from Sertar, too. But events there will be on the minds of some U.S. officials traveling with the president; Washington hopes to raise the issue at bilateral human-rights discussions that may resume later this month. Chinese authorities are expected to continue demolition until October, and in early August, NEWSWEEK has learned, a bomb exploded outside local government offices in...
  • Second Wives Club

    On the low-quality videotape, Li Ping glides into the Macau casino as if she owns the joint. The brassy, bejeweled 45-year-old and her lover, Chinese Parliament Vice Chairman Cheng Kejie, were in fact habitues at the tables, often gambling away thousands of dollars in a single evening. Unfortunately, that money was bilked from the Chinese state. And after the couple's last Macau gambling spree was secretly videotaped in 1999, mainland authorities came down hard on the high-rollers from Guangxi province. Cheng was executed for bribery in September; his "evil concubine" Li, as she was dubbed, is now serving a life sentence. The illicit couple have become poster children in Beijing's anti-corruption drive, which prominently features photos of Cheng, handcuffed and bearing a sign that reads "corrupt and degenerate."For centuries in feudal China, concubines stood as symbols of wealth and status. The communists decried the practice of keeping er nai ("second wives") as a bourgeois...
  • All That Glitters...

    China has learned its lesson well. Eight years ago, the last time it tried to host the Olympic Games, officials got all huffy when they were asked about their country's blighted human-rights record. To no one's great surprise, Beijing lost the 2000 Games to Sydney. This time Beijing has only one kind of face to show to the world: sunny. It has hired top Western PR specialists and paid U.S. Olympic filmmaker Bud Greenspan to help make a "documentary" that's supposed to clinch China's bid when the International Olympic Committee meets in Moscow this Friday. Smilingly, Beijing has tried to address every concern, meet every objection. When Olympic officials--always picky--objected to Tiananmen Square as an "inappropriate" venue for beach volleyball, authorities quickly offered other options. To court the Western highbrow vote, Beijing staged a lavish performance last month by the Three Tenors, with a live audience of 30,000 people, inside the fabled Forbidden City. After the show and a...
  • The Beijing Swing

    Beijing is not pretty. the polluted air burns your eyes, but it's less painful than much of the city's architecture. The old temples and palaces seem lost and out of place. Most of them are practically eclipsed by the neon razzle- dazzle of gaudy tourist hotels, the over-bearing bulk of Mao Zedong's totalitarian public edifices and the glassy anonymity of corporate office towers. All around the city, entire neighborhoods have been bulldozed and repopulated by ubiquitous construction cranes. Westerners tend to dislike the place on sight. They prefer to think of Shanghai as the face of China's future.They're wrong. Hypermodern Shanghai is very good at one thing: business. For many ordinary Chinese, the true variety and chaos of the People's Republic is most concentrated in Beijing. People swarm here from all over the country, legally or not, lured by the opportunities, the possibilities and the sense of cultural ferment. "Beijing has students, artists, officials, executives,...
  • No Justice, No Peace

    You'd think an authoritarian state would have no problem collecting taxes. But for three years the remote Chinese village of Yuntang refused to pay. Fed up with arbitrary taxes and alleging embezzlement by local officials, the 1,400 villagers erected a barrier across the only road. Last April authorities finally cracked down. More than 600 People's Armed Police entered Yuntang, and when villagers resisted, the police opened fire on the unarmed farmers, killing two and wounding 20.These are bad times for tax collectors in the Middle Kingdom. Beijing is trying to recentralize power to pull in revenue--partly because regional authorities have been extracting fees willy-nilly from the rural population, calling them "taxes." But peasant incomes have been dropping due to falling grain prices. The result: peasants are up in arms--sometimes literally--against arbitrary fees while the central government loses revenue. And virtually all the unauthorized local "taxes" wind up in the pockets of...
  • Mountain Maoists

    Deep in Nepal's mountainous countryside, kilometers from the nearest dirt road, locals in the village of Lung are gearing up for the next proletarian revolution. Two weeks ago thousands of locals gathered to hear underground Maoist cadres and guerrillas give old-style communist speeches and recruit new supporters. Anti-fascist slogans adorned mud-and-thatch huts. Farmers in western Pyuthan district hiked for hours to attend the rally.Lung, about 300 kilometers west of Katmandu, lacks running water, electricity and phone service. But there is no shortage of 50-year-old political ideology. Maoist rants are considered old-think in neighboring China. With some consternation, Beijing officials have stressed that they have nothing to do with Nepal's Maoists. But don't tell that to the villagers in Lung. The rally seemed straight out of Mao Zedong's Long March--complete with the traditional musical instruments (such as bulbous drums and curved trumpets) and song-and-dance troupes. "Do the...
  • Nepal's Maoist Threat

    The CIA did it, with help from Indian spies and other outsiders. That was the message spread last week by Nepal's Maoist insurgents to explain the massacre of the country's royal family on June 1. Eyewitnesses told a different story: that the king, queen and other royals had been slaughtered in a drunken rage by the crown prince, who then shot himself in the head, sank into a coma, was proclaimed king and finally died. That version of events was so bizarre that many Nepalese were inclined to believe conspiracy theories. And that was a stroke of luck for the Maoist rebels eager to take advantage of a weakened monarchy.With the country slipping toward chaos, Maoist leaders met secretly in Katmandu to plan their strategy. "They are gathering in the capital," reported a local businessman, one of many paying protection money to the insurgents. "They believe they could have a chance to take the country if they play their cards right." In fact, an immediate Maoist takeover of the world's...
  • A Blessing For China

    China and the Roman Catholic Church: seldom if ever has history produced a more irreconcilable clash of culture and politics. Roman Catholics have been part of China's political life since the early 1600s, when Jesuit Matteo Ricci entranced Emperor Wan Li with gifts of prisms, maps and clocks. But after the 1949 communist victory, Mao Zedong cut his country's ties to Rome. An official, "patriotic" Catholic Church was started, which rejected papal authority. The Vatican's anti-communist envoy was expelled from Beijing and fled to Taiwan.After 1958 official Catholics began ordaining their own bishops without Vatican approval. Vatican loyalists countered by holding underground services of their own, starting a bitter rivalry between the two factions. One of the prickliest issues is whether Beijing or the pope has ultimate authority to ordain bishops, control finances, allow abortions and decide other key church matters. Relations between China and the Vatican hit a low point last year...
  • Keeping The Faith

    In the isolated mountain village of Cizhong, perched above the banks of the Mekong River in Yunnan province, a breathtakingly elegant European-style cathedral rises above the countryside, the legacy of Catholic priests who arrived in the region in 1866. A few families still brew red wine from wild grapes, a skill taught to the locals by French priests. Two thirds of the population is Catholic--about 600 people. Cizhong has no official priest in residence. So the congregation eagerly awaits visits by traveling Catholic fathers--and sometimes postpones the observance of holy days, such as Christmas, until one arrives. "Normally we hold our own services, our own baptisms," says a 75-year-old villager named Ho Zhixiang, the senior layperson. "When a Catholic is about to pass away, sometimes people call me to come to their side."That the villagers have kept the faith is not the only remarkable fact about this outpost. They also happen to be ethnic Tibetans, who are usually raised as...
  • Indonesia: Why The World Should Worry

    The first point to remember about Indonesia is this: it's an important country-and it's going to be very messy for a very long time. ...
  • Blowing The Whistle

    Standing trial in Hong Kong is a disorienting experience for 48-year-old Cheng Sui-wa. He cannot understand English, so he leans forward awkwardly to catch the whispers of his Mandarin interpreter. Both his defense attorney and the public prosecutor are thickset Australian barristers who wear yellowing horsehair wigs. Charged with instigating a more than U.S.$ 14 million fraud using bogus letters of credit, Cheng has argued in an earlier trial that he cannot be held responsible for his actions because he was acting at the behest of his former employer, the People's Liberation Army. And that in itself might be the strangest thing about his case. ...
  • Look Who's Talking

    The war of words that has raged between Beijing and Washington over the past few weeks hasn't always been a matter of diplomatic nuance. "The United States would be foolish to send GIs to China just to die," warned one irate Chinese Netizen after U.S. President George W. Bush pledged to do "whatever it took" to defend Taiwan in the event of a mainland attack. "I strongly protest that the government can't do anything but strongly protest," complained another. A third blasted the American president as "Bu-sh-t." By now, similar rants in Chinese Internet chat rooms have become de rigueur in every foreign-policy crisis involving the People's Republic. As much as fire-breathing American legislators and stern Chinese generals, they have become a critical voice in Sino-U.S. relations. ...
  • The Littlest Outlaws

    In case anyone from the government asks, Wang the grocer has only one child, just as the law allows. That's what he told the census takers who canvassed his neighborhood on the outskirts of Beijing last November. "Why invite trouble?" says Wang, 35--the proud father of three children, all daughters. The oldest, 12, is properly registered with the authorities and living with her grandmother back home in Shandong province. The two others, 8 and 7, were born in the crowded anonymity of Beijing. On paper they don't exist. ...
  • Beijing's Next Big Battle

    Only a month ago, things were going well for President Jiang Zemin. His suave foreign-policy guru, Deputy Minister Qian Qichen, had just completed a successful trip to Washington. It was no easy feat. Hard-liners on both sides of the Pacific were working to sabotage Jiang's moderate overtures to the new American president. The hawks in Beijing had detained two U.S.-based ethnic Chinese scholars in February. The hawks in Washington leaked word of the detentions--and of the recent defection by a high-ranking Chinese colonel--to embarrass Beijing in the middle of Qian's visit. Still the trip went forward, and Qian won promises of a U.S.-China summit in the fall with the man the Chinese call "Little Bush." ...
  • A Crash In The Clouds

    Aside from pilots' wings, the two men had as little in common as their two countries. Lt. Shane Osborn of Norfolk, Neb., flew a slow, propeller-driven EP-3E, a kind of lumbering airborne tape recorder designed to suck up electronic signals--radio and radar transmissions, missile telemetry, phone calls--that might one day help the United States fight a war against China. Wang Wei, 33, was a fighter pilot, a Chinese "top gun" whose F-8 jet scrambled to intercept intruders--usually American spy planes like the EP-3E flown by Osborn. Flying spy planes is boring, unglamorous work, interspersed with moments of danger (of the 200 American airmen killed during the cold war, most were on reconnaissance missions). The pilots of spy planes are often lowly lieutenants like Osborn, who is 26 years old. Their main duty is to stay on course for hours on end. To break the tedium, the crews of American spy planes sometimes clown around. When Chinese fighters intercepted an EP-3E in the winter of...
  • Generation Superpower

    Sun Xiaojing has a map of the United States taped to the ceiling above the upper bunk bed in her Beijing University dormitory room. Seventeen red dots on the map mark the graduate schools to which the 25-year-old has applied. The same day that a crippled U.S. spy plane landed on Hainan Island after colliding with a Chinese fighter jet, triggering a tense diplomatic standoff, Sun was accepted to the University of California at Berkeley. "My decision to study in the United States has nothing to do with politics. It is my individual choice, regardless of the relations between the U.S. and China," she says, smiling and holding up her precious acceptance letter. ...
  • 'This Is War'

    The messages are strident and unequivocal. "All Chinese must stand up and fight against Americans," declares one participant in Beijing University's online bulletin board. "[T]his time we've already got some Americans in our hands. Let's kill some of them and brainwash the others." ...