Newsweek Staff

Stories by Newsweek Staff

  • Delays And Dollars

    Blurred vision is the most recent obstacle encountered by the Hubble Space Telescope since Congress first funded it in 1977. Budgetary and managerial woes--as well as bad luck--have plagued the 13-ton instrument from the start. ...
  • Singh For His Supper

    Who's sari now? Not Peter Singh, a Pakistani-born Elvis wannabe. When he's not running a carry-out food shop in Wales, Singh croons cross-cultural originals like "My Popadum Told Me," "Bhindi Bhaji Boogie" and "RockingWith the Sikh" to rapt Londoners. Singh got his inspiration from the King himself, who appeared to him in a dream and passed the mantle. Now, says Singh, "I don't smoke dope. I don't drink bourbon. All I want to do is shake my turban."
  • Acting Frisky At Comiskey

    The Chicago Cubs used to be the team of the trendy. Celebrities, an ex-president included, did play by play. Bryant Gumbel and George Will were avid fans. Even the ballpark was perfect: with its ivy-draped brick, it had a certain collegiate panache. But no longer. The hot ticket in Chicago this season isn't the fifth-place Cubs, it's the White--hot Sox. That's right, the White Sox--the humble team from the South Side, the team that once took the field in shorts, for God's sake--last week grabbed the lead in the American League West. ...
  • A Bigger Bite For The George

    The town fathers of Kennebunkport, Maine, home of George Bush's summer White House, have solved a problem the president has been unable to manage. They're cutting the tax rates but taking more out of the taxpayers" wallets. Since land values in the area have more than doubled over the past eight years, the latest assessment on Bush's compound has soared to $2.2 million, from $892,000 in 1982. Even at the new rate of $11 per $1,000 valuation (down from $22.40), Bush will owe $23,20--up from $17,832 last year.
  • Fans, Start Your Engines

    Summer movies are nothing if not fun so let's have some fun with Days of Thun. den This is the one in which Tom Cruise plays a race-car driver on the NASCAR (stock car) circuit. So why is his name Cole Trickle? This is worth thinking about, especially since Cruise himself is credited with I the story, along with screenwriter Robert Towne. Why would a sex bomb like Cruise want to be called Trickle? Sounds more like an oil leak. His erstwhile rival and eventual buddy (played by Michael Rooker) is called Rowdy Burns--now there's the quintessential race driver's moniker. ...
  • French Revolution, Family Style

    The collapse of socialism has brought Europe into a postrevolutionary age. Louis: Malle's May Fools can be called the first postrevolutionary comedy. It takes place in May 1968, when the left-wing student demonstrations in Paris were shaking all of France. In Malle's delicious film those events are reflected and parodied in the hurried reunion of a family in the wine country of the southwest. The octogenarian matriarch, Madame Vieuzac (Paulette Dubost), suddenly dies, leaving her estate in the care of her dreamy 60-year-old son Milou (.Michel Piccoli). Promptly, several generations of Vieuzacs converge on the family villa. As the radio blares out ominous bulletins on the political upheavals in the cities, the family spars and spats about the disposal of the estate. Since the local gravediggers have caught the anarchic fever, the body of Madame Vienzac goes unburied. She becomes a kind of ironic spirit, surveying the mini-revolution in her fractious family. ...
  • A Princess For The People

    It was a joining of many kinds: old and new,elegant and simple, man and woman. When Prince Aya(second son of Emperor Akihito) and his college friend, a commoner, Kiko Kawashima, were married last week on the grounds of the Imperial Palace in Tokyo, the nation rejoiced. Here was a couple anyone could love. Princess Kiko and the newly named Prince Akishino will live in a modest home. They will continue their studies: she in social psychology, he in catfish. If there was any unhappiness at all, it was only Japanese sorrow that the heir to the throne, Crown Prince Naruhito, remains a bachelor.
  • Mandela, A Great Stone Face

    The exterior of New York's Cathedral of St. John the Divine already displays limestone carvings of Moses and Abraham Lincoln. Next year Nelson Mandela will join this distinguished historic company-along with a carving of a Zulu warrior in combat with a dragon (symbolizing apartheid). The stonecutters and carvers who are working on the cathedral decided to include Mandela while the leader of black South Africa was still in Victor Verster prison farm, long before his U.S. visit. The Mandela carving, which was executed by Emmanuel Fourchet,24, will be installed on the cathedral's south tower--facing Harlem.
  • Extra, Extra!

    The first independent U.S. Soviet newspaper hits the kiosks in Moscow this week. Called We/Mbl, it is a joint venture by the Hearst Corp. and Izvestia. A colorful mix of hard news, scandal, sports and comics, the first issue of the weekly has stories about a scheme to sell Soviet tnaks abroad for condoms and pantyhose, the AIDS epidemic in the U.S.S.R., (the lambada and X-rated video clubs) and the first U.S. soccer player to sign with a Soviet team. Hearst trained four Izvestia journalist in Western-style reporting and provided the paper and presses for the maiden issue.
  • Aid To Moscow: Reward Or Rathole?

    It took some convincing. In S 1948, when the Truman administration proposed saving Western Europe by pumping some $13 billion into the economy through the Marshall Plan, the U.S. Senate was ready to say no. But reality overwhelmed politics. At next week's economic summit in Houston, the leaders of the seven major industrialized nations will consider a similar cure for the ruined post-coldwar economy of the Soviet Union. West German Chancellor Helmut Kohl, whose country last month gave $3 billion in new loans to Moscow, will propose that Western nations raise an additional $15 billion to bail out the Soviets and their beleaguered leader Mikhail Gorbachev. ...
  • Sununu The Illusionist

    Was White House chief of staff John Sununu really opposed to President Bush's backtrack on taxes last week? White House operatives put out the word Sununu was the "obstacle" that had to be overcome in persuading Bush to abandon his campaign pledge of "no new taxes." However, NEWSWEEK has learned Sununu was on board from early on. Democratic leaders who met with Bush at the White House Tuesday said Sununu "looked like he was kicked in the teeth" by Bush's decison. But administration insiders say Sununu was just posturing to create the illusion for I conservatives of support for | them at the White House. "Creating the appearance of disharmony . . . gives conservatives the sense of an inside champion," said a GOP operative. Still, some hard-liners are saying maybe Bush should face a '92 challenge. Possible candidates: columnist Patrick Buchanan or New Hampshire Sen. Gordon Humphrey.
  • Will Democrats Dunk The Rich?

    July 4 is Calvin Coolidge's birthday, and when Ronald Reagan was president a small party was often held in the White House to celebrate it. Now Coolidge's White House portrait has been replaced by Theodore Roosevelt's, suggesting symbolically that the free market is no longer the state religion. But if the new, tax-flexible George Bush senses that the ideological wind has shifted, he still seems unwilling to sound any of the populist themes that characterized his patrician predecessors. Teddy lambasted the "malefactors of great wealth"; cousin FDR said of Wall Street: "They hate me, and I welcome their hatred"; Bush, no traitor to his class, says that one of the major goals of his presidency is to lower the capital-gains tax on the rich. ...
  • Trump's Latest Deal: For Time

    Who says Donald Trump--he of 727 jets, 282-foot yachts and 118-room mansions--can't live frugally? Recently Trump and about 20 bankers, lawyers and consultants were in the midst of yet another long and tedious negotiating session when, according to a banker, Trump proposed they stop for something to eat. "I'll get some McDonald's," Trump said, yelling out an order for about 25 Big Macs, cheeseburgers, fries and sodas. Was Trump posturing for the benefit of his creditors? The banker didn't think so: "He seemed to know the menu." ...
  • Biting The Bullet

    Bush's flip-flop on taxes breaks the deadlock with Congress--but threatens revolt in the GOP and a long, tough negotiation to cut the budget deficit ...
  • What's On--And Beyond--The Sun

    Given the embarrassing failure of the Hubble Space Telescope, what is the future for other unmanned space probes? The answer, . surprisingly, is quite good, regardless of whether the American space-shuttle program recovers from its recurrent ills. As many as a dozen unmanned universe gazers may be launched by other rockets and other nations this decade, and the scientific harvest is likely to be rich.."The '80s were an extremely dead time for this work--almost no missions were launched," says David Morrison, chief of the Space Science Division at NASA's Ames Research Center. "But starting last year, we have a tremendous concentration of, launches and a wonderful time of excitement for astronomy." ...
  • No Common Ground

    Abortion: The Clash of Absolutes. By Laurence H. Tribe. 270pages. Norton. $19.95. ...
  • To Russia, With Movie Deals

    The movie is pure Hollywood thriller, complete with a leaking nuclear reactor, panicking townspeople and an allstar cast, including Jon Voight and Jason Robards. But as filming began last month on "The Final Warning," a re-creation of the 1986 Chernobyl meltdown, the real drama was the choice of location. Cast and crew assembled before a nuclear plant in Kruchatov, 300 miles south of Moscow. In an unprecedented deal made possible by glasnost, the Soviet government has teamed with Carolco--best known, ironically, for financing the anti-communist Rambo pictures--to make the $4 million movie for Turner Network Television. ...
  • Bad Time For Terrorists

    Colleagues at East Germany's People's Geothermic Enterprise knew the nondescript record keeper as "Dieter Lenz." During seven years in the plant's record-keeping department, Lenz worked odd hours and kept to himself. But the quiet 31-year-old allegedly had a violent past. Last week East German police took him away in handcuffs. They charged that he is really Henning Beer, a top entry on West Germany's most-wanted list as a suspected member of the Red Army Faction (RAF) terrorist gang. He was one of 10 RAF suspects arrested in East Germany in the last two weeks. A German investigative reporter noticed that during three RAF attacks, including the murder of Deutsche Bank chairman Alfred Herrhausen last fall, Dieter Lenz happened to be on vacation. ...
  • Fixing The 'Between'

    When it first appeared three decades ago, the field of family therapy was considered revolutionary for its view of the family as as "system" in which members collide with one another in predictable ways. Today family theraphy is undergoing a small revolution of its own. Spurred by feminists in its midst, the profession is being forced to re-examined its persistent sexual stereotyping of family members--a tendency all the more curious in a brand of theraphy that all places heavy emphasis on gender roles. One of the more familiar, and problematic, family constellations, for instance, is the so-called persuader-distancer couple, consisting of an "over-involved" mother and an "unavailable' father who between them, stir up a witch's brew offamily tensions. Such concepts have come under attack by feminist who believe that a mother's expressive way are somehow being turned into a liability by therapist. ...
  • Not-So-Square Squires

    In the peerage of pop, British rocker Roger Daltrey is already royalty. Beyond the bandstand, though, the lead singer for The Who has found a place in an entirely separate Who's Who: he's become a country gentleman. The good Mr. Daltrey is the proud owner of a comfortable estate near the English village of Burwash--and not shy about it. For a recent American Express ad, he strolled around his private lake doing the famous, "Do you know me?" routine dressed in a Barbour jacket, cloth hat and Wellingtons. "I run this trout fishery," says the man who made millions singing "We won't get fooled again." He then makes his way . . . not to a limo, but a Land Rover. ...
  • How The West Was Tamed

    As Petruchio, Morgan Freeman is a true cowboy suitor in the New York Shakespeare Festival's frontier version of "The Taming of the Shrew." The production, set in the old Southwest, began previews in Central Park last week. Ever the deadeye, Freeman uses a lasso to tame the prairie virago Kate (Tracey Ullman). "She's someone I know," says Ullman. "She's 40, intelligent, witty but has no man because there's no one to match her." Freeman "may think he's tamed me," she adds, "but I don't think he really has."
  • Keeping The Pressure On President Bush

    Keep the pressure on," chanted the adoring throngs after Nelson Mandela stepped off a jetliner in New York last week and invoked the main theme of his six-week, 14-nation tour. The demand raised questions all but forgotten since the emotional sanctions debate of 1986: how much pressure, and for how long The South African government was hoping for a reward for its relaxation of political repression, including Mandela's release. Pretoria may soon meet the legal test that would enable President Bush to begin lifting U.S. economic sanctions, the most stringent imposed by any of South Africa's major trading partners. But Mandela insists sanctions should stay "until fundamental and irreversible changes take place"--and that will take years, at best. "[South African President F. W.] de Klerk has done nothing," Mandela said. "What are you rewarding him for?" ...
  • Mandela

    At a historic crossroads in Harlem Nelson Mandela staked his claim. One by one, he invoked the black heroes and martyrs whose words had echoed there before him: Marcus Garvey, Paul Robeson, Adam Clayton Powell Jr., Malcolm X, Martin Luther King Jr. There were perhaps 100,000 people pressed against the barricades, filling the streets in all four directions from the platform, and the roar swelled louder as each of the great names sounded. "I am here to claim you because ... you have claimed our struggle," Mandela said. "Harlem signifies the glory of resistance. We are on the verge of victory ... Death to racism! " That brought the loudest roar of all, a mighty ovation in the gathering dusk.With his regal bearing, his smiling serenity and his unbroken spirit after 27 years in South African prisons, Mandela was an authentic heir to the heroes' mantle. And in New York last week, the Harlem rally, a ticker-tape parade, a United Nations address and an ecstatic, chanting celebration in...
  • Congress: The Flag Boosters Get Burned

    George Bush and the GOP's congressional leadership had hoped to fete the Fourth of July with the first step toward a new-and-improved Bill of Rights. But last week the House of Representatives rained on their parade, defeating a proposed constitutional amendment to ban desecration of the American flag. For several days, congressmen debated the issue with a mix of passion and parody. While Illinois Rep. Henry J. Hyde invoked people who "paid for [the flag] with their blood," Rep. Gary L. Ackerman of New York displayed items with a flag motif, including panty hose and garbage bags. "How about American flag napkins?" said Ackerman. "What if you blow your nose in one? Have you broken the law?" ...
  • An Unusual Call From A Listener

    Geraldo should jump all over this one. During a radio talk show in New Orleans last week, noted sex therapist Dr. Judith Kuriansky instructed a female caller to give her inattentive husband "a real big ultimatum to push him off his chair." To which the caller replied, "Why don't you take your hand and push him off the chair. He's sitting two feet from you." The caller was Marilou Hunter, wife of the show's host, Ron Hunter. That night Marilou, 32, was fatally shot as she lay in bed with her husband. Hunter, 51, told police he awoke to find his wife bleeding from a self-inflicted chest wound. Beside her was Hunter's gun. For the record, Marilou accused Ron of physical abuse in one of the two separation suits she filed in the last two years. Hunter denied the claim and said she beat him. No charges have been filed in the death, pending a coroner's report, expected soon.
  • Can This Marriage Be Saved?

    Quebec was preparing for the feast of the shepherd Jean Baptiste, the province's patron saint. For the first time since 1969, when separatist violence marred the celebration, a parade was scheduled; children would ride through the streets of Montreal in a float shaped like a lamb three stories high. Last week the lamb stood outside the fold. Prime Minister Brian Mulroney pronounced dead his six-year campaign to resolve a long-running constitutional crisis by reconciling French Quebec with English Canada. "Just because the sheep is an animal that has a reputation for following, we don't want to be ashamed of it," said Robert Gariepy, a volunteer organizer in Montreal. "We want to be proud of and show the positive direction we're taking with our country." ...
  • Taking Up Arms Against Aids

    Police riot squads are not a common sight at scientific meetings. But the Sixth International Conference on AIDS, held in San Francisco last week was special. Activists--many of whose lives now depend on the pace of scientific progress--were expected to outnumber the 12,000 conference delegates by 10 to one. The activists were angry, and local officials braced for the worst. In addition to the usual dining and sightseeing tips, the press kits handed out to arriving reporters included a letter from the chief of police, explaining what to do "if you find yourself within a group of demonstrators that is to be dispersed by crowd control officers" and "circumstances do not permit escape." ...
  • From 'Donald Ducks' To 'Trump: The Joke'

    It was getting to be like the Perils of Pauline. Would Donald Trump get a reprieve with a last-minute loan package? Would he show up headlines like DONALD DUCKS by making debt payments befora Tuesday's deadline? And lurking over those questions was an even bigger one: was the renowned dealmaker in danger of becoming: Trump: TheJoke? ...
  • Found: Man's Newest Furry Cousin

    Biologists can be an existential bunch: to them, no species exists until a scientist describes it. For centuries the coastal fishermen of the Brazilian barrier island Superaqui took for granted the caras pretas, or black-faced monkeys, playing on their roofs and gamboling in the seaside brush. Last year zoologist Dante Martins Teixeira of the National Museum in Rio de Janeiro met a Superaqui native who told him about the squirrel-size monkeys who had golden manes like lions and black tails, forearms and faces. Two of Martins's colleagues from Brazil's Capao da Imbuia Natural History Museum spent a month on the island observing the monkeys in the wild. The creatures were too cunning and fast for the camera, but the biologists did bring back a preserved skin given to them by a fisherman. After close scrutiny, the Brazilians announced last week that they had "discovered" a new primate species, Leontopithecus caissara, or black-faced lion tamarin. If they're right, the creature is a...
  • Hailing A Hero--And Looking For Our Own

    Everywhere Nelson Mandela went in New York last week, black folks brought their kids. Parents led them through the downtown crowds to watch the ticker-tape parade; they carried them on their shoulders during the tour of Harlem; they kept them up until almost midnight at the rally in Yankee Stadium. Thousands saw it as a once-in-a-lifetime chance to expose children to someone they could hold up as a true black hero. The images were moving--but they pointed up a conspicuous irony. Many African-Americans now seem to feel far more passionately about Mandela than they do about any black leaders here in this country. ...