Newsweek Staff

Stories by Newsweek Staff

  • Can Hormones Stop The Ciock?

    The American quest for the fountain of youth is never ending, and thanks to a study in last week's New England Journal of Medicine, old folks and Eli Lilly & Co. have a hot new prospect: human growth hormone. By injecting a synthetic version of the hormone into a handful of healthy, aging men for six months, researchers managed to reverse the process by which lean body mass gives way to fat. Indeed, the six-month regimen seemed to undo 10 to 20 years of skin, bone and muscle deterioration, prompting speculation that prolonged youth would one day be an option for anyone who could afford the treatment (it would cost about $14,000 a year at current prices). But don't hold your breath. As one expert puts it, "To think this is going to be an anti-aging panacea is a mistake." ...
  • A Host Of World Cup Problems

    Italy--shaped like a foot, centrally located in the soccer universe and seething I with enthusiasm for the game of long, l scoreless stretches and short pants--seemed like the perfect place to stage a World Cup competition. Yet for all the hoopla that surrounded the final match between West Germany and Argentina last Sunday in Rome, the 1990 tournament could not be considered an unqualified success. Tourism dropped an estimated 25 percent during the World Cup, as travelers resisted costly package tours and worried about the hooliganism. Even in the late rounds, many seats remained empty, the result, partly, of corporate sponsors getting more tickets than they could distribute. If the cup had been held someplace less steeped in soccer tradition, it could have been a disaster. Which is what worries some people about the next tournament. The 1994 World Cup will be played in the United States, a country that has venues separated by 3,000 miles and four time zones--not to mention a...
  • Zina's Breakthrough

    Tennis has moved out of the country club in recent | years, but it remains a sport heavily tilted in favor of players who grew up with money. Zina Garrison, a hard-luck 26-year-old who learned to play on a Houston playground, struck a democratic blow last week with a shocker upset of top-ranked Steffi Graf in the Wimbledon semifinals, 6-3, 3-6, 6-4. After a hard-fought first game, she succumbed to the unsinkable Martina Navratilova in the finals, 64, 6-1, giving the 33 year-old veteran a record ninth Wimbledon singles title. But even while falling short, Garrison left the tennis world with a memorable taste of grit, advancing further than any black woman since Althea Gibson in 1958. ...
  • One City, Two Summits

    When most people think of Houston, they're likely to conjure up all-day barbecues, not economic-summit meetings. Yet that image will change this week--as Houston hosts not one summit, but two. There's the grand one for the great powers, the one for which Houston has spent nearly $10 million and planted thousands of begonias. Then there's another l gathering, made up largely of leftist academics and activists, that has taken on the pun-prone acronym TOES: The Other Economic Summit. This second get-together--a three-day affair kicked off on Friday--includes a range of seminars on such subjects as environmental decay and economic self-reliance for Third World nations. The object: to serve as a counterpoint to concerns of the industrialized nations. Says participant Max Sisulu, son of African National Congress leader Walter Sisulu and a recent returnee to South Africa after 27 years in exile, "It is a summit for the ordinary people who want to have a say in the running of their lives." ...
  • Now, The Task Is 'Economic Containment'

    During the cold war, containment meant keeping Soviet expansionism in check. Today, containment is taking on a new geopolitical meaning: preventing the economic might of Germany and Japan from so dominating world exports that it tears apart the global trading system. The gravity of the issue--"the issue of the 1990s," as Robert Lawrence of The Brookings Institution calls it--means that once uneventful economic summits, such as this week's meeting in Houston, will replace NATO summits as the most important international get-togethers of the year. Economics is no longer the sideshow; it's center stage. "The danger is that we replace the cold war with a trade war," says Robert Hormats of Goldman Sachs International, who himself helped organize half a dozen summits. "In a demilitarized era, economic forces are king." ...
  • The New Teacher Corps

    The more than 500 young men and women who filed into a University of Southern California auditorium last month were not there to collect their diplomas. In fact, most of them had graduated from college weeks before. This time, as they made their way through the 112-degree heat, they had something grander in mind. "Above and beyond everything," said Dan Brooks, a 21-year-old graduate of St. Olaf College in Minnesota, "I want to teach. Put me wherever. I'll teach whatever." ...
  • Biting The Bullet

    Bush's flip-flop on taxes breaks the deadlock with Congress--but threatens revolt in the GOP and a long, tough negotiation to cut the budget deficit ...
  • What's On--And Beyond--The Sun

    Given the embarrassing failure of the Hubble Space Telescope, what is the future for other unmanned space probes? The answer, . surprisingly, is quite good, regardless of whether the American space-shuttle program recovers from its recurrent ills. As many as a dozen unmanned universe gazers may be launched by other rockets and other nations this decade, and the scientific harvest is likely to be rich.."The '80s were an extremely dead time for this work--almost no missions were launched," says David Morrison, chief of the Space Science Division at NASA's Ames Research Center. "But starting last year, we have a tremendous concentration of, launches and a wonderful time of excitement for astronomy." ...
  • Buzzwords

    Life in big urban hospitals is hardly romantic, abd the vocabulary in those hospitals reflects that fact: Eating the bill: Providing care for indigen patients who are not covered by insurance. Usage: "We ate the bill on that guy."Whales:Extremely obese patients, Usage: "A whale just hit the beach in the emergency room."Cabge(pronounced cabbage): A coronary artery bypass operation.Head:A brain-injury patient. Usage: "I've got deal with."
  • Mandela's Discipline

    By sheer force of his personality Nelson Mandela accomplished the impossible in Washington. No, he didn't get the money for the African National Congress and he didn't get the commitment he wished for American sanctions to be sustained until such time as he and his political partners give the sign that it is OK to lift them. He did something much more difficult: he took charge of the conversation, blew away the conventional and somewhat nasty debate we were set to have about him and compelled political Washington to receive and comprehend him on his own terms. Unheard of. ...
  • Out Of Bounds

    New York psychaitrist Robert Willis, who last week pleaded guilty to buying stock based on information he learned from an unwitting patient. Willis, 51, admitted he bought shares in Bank America Corp. after his patient, the wife of Wall Street financier Sanford Weill, told him she worried about upheaval in her life if her husband's bid to buy Bank America succeeded. Prosecutors charged Willis made $27,000 on trades made just before news of the negotiations broke.
  • Pulling Out The Peace Corps

    The parting was as controversial as it was poignant. Peace Corps volunteers recalled to Manila from remote provincial posts shut: fled into Malacanang Palace--some in sneakers, blue jeans and T shirts--for a tearful farewell with President Corazon Aquino. For nearly 30 years their predecessors had toiled in the Philippine countryside, bringing education and health services to the desperately poor. Last week American Ambassador Nicholas Platt sent the 260 volunteers home. or off' to other countries. Communist guerrillas with the New People's Army were "moving toward more and more terrorism," said a senior U.S. official, and the volunteers were in danger. The embassy subsequently announced that Peace Corps volunteer Timothy Swanson had been kidnapped on the island of Negros. Ten Amerians have been killed in NPA attacks since 1987; the rebels have threatened many others in a campaign to ush America to withdraw its 40,000 troops from Clark Air Base and Subic Bay Naval Station. ...
  • The Myth Of German Unity

    Wir sind ein Volk," they chanted in Dresden, Leipzig and Berlin: we are one people. For more than a century, Germans have subscribed to what George Kennan once called "romantic linguistic nationalism"--a belief that a common tongue creates a community. They have lived since the war in the conviction that only an artificial border divides them. It is a myth. After 45 years East and West Germans have grown apart. Now, as they come together in pursuit of prosperity, the Germans are ignoring a little secret. The new Germany will be one nation, but two peoples. ...
  • Departure Of A Dissident

    For 385 days, Chinese dissident Fang Lizhi was a captive of his own freedom. He was guilty, said the Beijing regime, of "crimes of counterrevolutionary propaganda and instigation." Inside the U.S. Embassy, where he took sanctuary after last June's crackdown, he could say and write what he pleased. But he and his wife, Li Shuxian, faced arrest if they stepped beyond the compound's gates. Last week their self-imposed confinement finally ended. Their liberators: a bad heart, sympathetic academics at Cambridge University and final negotiations involving Fang, U.S. Ambassador James Lilley and the Chinese Foreign Ministry. ...
  • Band-Aid Wars: Adding Extensions To Injury

    It's war. And the battlefield is your kid's boo-boo. The leaders of the adhesive-bandage industry are using line extensions to cut into one another's hottest market: tiny consumers. Johnson & Johnson launched a new look: Band-Aids bearing the visages of Cookie Monster and Big Bird. Curad owners Ken-: dall-Futuro introduced Happy Strips, a tyke-size line of bandages printed with McDonald's characters. A smaller company, DuCair Bioessence of North Bergen, N.J., features a line of picture bandages that includes the Muppets, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, the Care Bears and even G.I. Joe. ...
  • Instrumental Changes

    The telescope has pro gressed from a simple lead tube with two lenses used by Galileo to the incredibly complex, $1.5 billion Hubble Space Telescope orbiting 380 miles above the Earth. PHOTO (BLACK & WHITE): The Galilean or refracting telescope produces an enlarged image with the aid of concave and convex lenses which bend light. In 1609, after fiddling with a telescope designed by an obscure Dutch lens maker, Galileo aimed his creation toward the heavens. By 1610, he had found four moons revolving around Jupiter.DIAGRAM: The Newtonian or reflecting telescope, first made in 1671, uses mirrors and lenses to bounce light and form images. Scottish mathematician James Gregory proposed the idea in 1663, but he didn't know how to grind and polish mirrors to the desired specifications. Sir Isaac Newton did--so he gets the credit.
  • Are Leos Next?

    In a letter to police, Zodiac vowed to kill 12 people--one born under each astrological sign. So far he has shot four men: a Scorpio and then in order, Gemini, Taurus and Cancer. Is a Leo next? The third man, who eventually died, said the gunman was an unkempt, bearded black man in his 30s, about six feet tall. The fourth victim, still alive, says that days before he was shot a stranger fitting the description wanted to know his birthday. Zodiac wrote that "Orion" could stop him and police are comparing on a map the pattern of that constellation to the shooting sites. Zodiac strikes on Thursdays, usually three weeks apart. Police fear July 12.
  • A New 'Partnership' For Latin America

    With the S&L crisis growing by the day, a lot of people have all but forgotten another long-simmering financial mess: Latin American debt. Not George Bush. Last week he unveiled a broad package of trade, investment and debt proposals to aid Latin America. ...
  • Why We Can Be Trusted

    The Random House Dictionary of the English Language defines "Germany" as follows: "a former country in central Europe, having Berlin as its capital, now divided into East Germany and West Germany." The Great Soviet Encyclopedia has almost the same definition: "a state in Europe (capital Berlin) which existed until the end of World War II." Now these definitions will have to be revised. ...
  • The Right-To-Lifers' New Tactics

    Despite the news from Washington, many of the right-to-lifers attending the Unity 90 conference in Chicago last week were not in a celebratory mood. The Supreme Court decisions upholding parental-notification laws were not "such a big deal," says Paul Brown, chief executive officer of the American Life League, which organized the gathering of 50 anti-abortion groups. The restrictions only "give the parents the right to OK the killing of their grandchild." But more moderate right-to-lifers around the country hailed the notification rulings as another blow against legal abortion--suggesting a shift in tactics, if not goals. "There has been no change in terms of moral principle," says Samuel Lee, a Missouri anti-abortion lobbyist. "There has been a change by many pro-life groups in terms of political realities." ...
  • A Third Party?

    Despite opposition from some local chapters, the National Organization for Women is exploring the formation of a third-party coalition of feminists, environmentalists and social-justice activists. A 40 member commission including former GOP Rep. John Anderson of Illinois--a third-party presidential candidate in 1980--former U.S. attorney general Ramsey Clark and ex-California Supreme Court chief justice Rose Bird will hold hearings around the country after this fall's elections and make recommendations to NOW next year. "Some people think we're crazy," says NOW president Molly Yard. "Others love the idea."
  • Feelin' Groovy On 7Th Avenue

    Now that men are wearing pigtails again, fashion designers seem to think that anything from the '60s is worth reprising. Brightly colored Pucci-inspired prints are one thing. But manufacturers are even bringing back bell bottorns. Apparently those who wore history are doomed to repeat it. ...
  • Murder America

    The United States is a gun-happy society that leads the industrialized world in homicides. Three fourths of all U.S. murders are committed with guns as compared with one fourth overseas. Here's the U.S. homicide rate compared with some selected countries: COUNTRY KILLINGS PER 100,000 MEN United States 21.9 Scotland 5.0 Israel 3.7 Sweden 2.3 France 1.4 Poland 1.2 England 1.2 West Germany 1.0 Japan 0.5 Austria 0.3
  • A Truce In The Trade War

    Will the real U.S.-Japanese trade talks please stand up? When the so called Structural Impediments Initiative (SII) talks started 10 months ago, they were billed as the most important set of bilateral negotiations that Washington and Tokyo had held since 1960. Next they were touted as an absolute disaster that threatened the most serious schism of the postwar era. Eventually they became a quaint, politically irrelevant intellectual exercise more appropriate for a collegiate debating club than the world's two leading economic powers. ...
  • 'My Home Is All Gone'

    Eric Matthys, 34, was at work when he looked out a window and saw clouds of smoke billowing near his Santa Barbara home. All night long, the University of California chemistry professor watched the raging brush fire through binoculars. His house survived the night, but the next day the winds changed. "Suddenly the fire came back up the mountain and engulfed the house, " he says. When the blaze subsided, all he had left were the remnants of a wood stove, a chimney, a bathtub and a barbecue. ...
  • Is The Parretti Deal Dead?

    Giancarlo Parretti, the mysterious Italian financier, has hit a major snag in his attempt to buy the MGM/UA film studios. The flamboyant owner of Pathe Communications scored a major coup in April when Time Warner agredd to secure a $650 million bank loan--half the $1.3 billion purchase price--in return for rights to the United Artists and Pathe film libraries. But last Friday, Time Warner filed a $100 million lawsuit against Pathe, claiming Parretti had reneged on his end of the bargain. Parretti, the suit charged, exercised a "one-way option to decide which of its obligations it would honor [and] which Time Warner rights it could ignore." Sources at Pathe suggest the Time Warner deal is dead. Parretti's latest scheme: a stead of a takeover.
  • A New Germany

    By merging their economies last weekend, East and West have created one Deutsche mark, one nation--and a new balance of power in Europe ...
  • Mrs. Thatcher's Munich

    Let me tell you about Joan Tong. Joan is an attractive, 23-year-old Hong Kong Chinese who happens to be smart as a whip to boot. When I lived in Hong Kong she was my secretary, but now she brightens up the office of Martin Lee, leader of the colony's newly formed pro-democracy party. Like most of Hong Kong's 6.8 million inhabitants, Joan considers her home a sort of Chinese paradise and doesn't want to leave--ever. But she knows that working for Mr. Lee has put her and her family at risk come Beijing's 1997 takeover of Hong Kong, and she would thus like an insurance policy. So when the Thatcher government announced that only 50,000 Hong Kong households would have a right of abode in the United Kingdom she asked the obvious. "Do you think I am on that list?" ...
  • The Wealth Of A Nation

    There's a fairy-tale quality to West Germany's economic takeover of East Germany. The fable goes something like this: ...
  • Hot Couples

    Virginia Gov. L. Douglas Wilder and former nude model-turned-socialite Pat Kluge. Wilder says he and Kluge are just "friends." But Kluge, separated from her billionaire husband, John Kluge, and Wilder, who is divorced, have reportedly weekended together on Nantucket, on Maryland's Eastern Shore and at Virginia Beach. Wilder earlier this year named Kluge, a high-school dropout, to the University of Virginia's Board of Visitors. The Kluges, who now live in separate houses on the same estate, were Wilder's chief campaign contributors.