Newsweek Staff

Stories by Newsweek Staff

  • The Right-To-Lifers' New Tactics

    Despite the news from Washington, many of the right-to-lifers attending the Unity 90 conference in Chicago last week were not in a celebratory mood. The Supreme Court decisions upholding parental-notification laws were not "such a big deal," says Paul Brown, chief executive officer of the American Life League, which organized the gathering of 50 anti-abortion groups. The restrictions only "give the parents the right to OK the killing of their grandchild." But more moderate right-to-lifers around the country hailed the notification rulings as another blow against legal abortion--suggesting a shift in tactics, if not goals. "There has been no change in terms of moral principle," says Samuel Lee, a Missouri anti-abortion lobbyist. "There has been a change by many pro-life groups in terms of political realities." ...
  • A Third Party?

    Despite opposition from some local chapters, the National Organization for Women is exploring the formation of a third-party coalition of feminists, environmentalists and social-justice activists. A 40 member commission including former GOP Rep. John Anderson of Illinois--a third-party presidential candidate in 1980--former U.S. attorney general Ramsey Clark and ex-California Supreme Court chief justice Rose Bird will hold hearings around the country after this fall's elections and make recommendations to NOW next year. "Some people think we're crazy," says NOW president Molly Yard. "Others love the idea."
  • Feelin' Groovy On 7Th Avenue

    Now that men are wearing pigtails again, fashion designers seem to think that anything from the '60s is worth reprising. Brightly colored Pucci-inspired prints are one thing. But manufacturers are even bringing back bell bottorns. Apparently those who wore history are doomed to repeat it. ...
  • Murder America

    The United States is a gun-happy society that leads the industrialized world in homicides. Three fourths of all U.S. murders are committed with guns as compared with one fourth overseas. Here's the U.S. homicide rate compared with some selected countries: COUNTRY KILLINGS PER 100,000 MEN United States 21.9 Scotland 5.0 Israel 3.7 Sweden 2.3 France 1.4 Poland 1.2 England 1.2 West Germany 1.0 Japan 0.5 Austria 0.3
  • A Truce In The Trade War

    Will the real U.S.-Japanese trade talks please stand up? When the so called Structural Impediments Initiative (SII) talks started 10 months ago, they were billed as the most important set of bilateral negotiations that Washington and Tokyo had held since 1960. Next they were touted as an absolute disaster that threatened the most serious schism of the postwar era. Eventually they became a quaint, politically irrelevant intellectual exercise more appropriate for a collegiate debating club than the world's two leading economic powers. ...
  • 'My Home Is All Gone'

    Eric Matthys, 34, was at work when he looked out a window and saw clouds of smoke billowing near his Santa Barbara home. All night long, the University of California chemistry professor watched the raging brush fire through binoculars. His house survived the night, but the next day the winds changed. "Suddenly the fire came back up the mountain and engulfed the house, " he says. When the blaze subsided, all he had left were the remnants of a wood stove, a chimney, a bathtub and a barbecue. ...
  • Is The Parretti Deal Dead?

    Giancarlo Parretti, the mysterious Italian financier, has hit a major snag in his attempt to buy the MGM/UA film studios. The flamboyant owner of Pathe Communications scored a major coup in April when Time Warner agredd to secure a $650 million bank loan--half the $1.3 billion purchase price--in return for rights to the United Artists and Pathe film libraries. But last Friday, Time Warner filed a $100 million lawsuit against Pathe, claiming Parretti had reneged on his end of the bargain. Parretti, the suit charged, exercised a "one-way option to decide which of its obligations it would honor [and] which Time Warner rights it could ignore." Sources at Pathe suggest the Time Warner deal is dead. Parretti's latest scheme: a stead of a takeover.
  • A New Germany

    By merging their economies last weekend, East and West have created one Deutsche mark, one nation--and a new balance of power in Europe ...
  • Mrs. Thatcher's Munich

    Let me tell you about Joan Tong. Joan is an attractive, 23-year-old Hong Kong Chinese who happens to be smart as a whip to boot. When I lived in Hong Kong she was my secretary, but now she brightens up the office of Martin Lee, leader of the colony's newly formed pro-democracy party. Like most of Hong Kong's 6.8 million inhabitants, Joan considers her home a sort of Chinese paradise and doesn't want to leave--ever. But she knows that working for Mr. Lee has put her and her family at risk come Beijing's 1997 takeover of Hong Kong, and she would thus like an insurance policy. So when the Thatcher government announced that only 50,000 Hong Kong households would have a right of abode in the United Kingdom she asked the obvious. "Do you think I am on that list?" ...
  • The Wealth Of A Nation

    There's a fairy-tale quality to West Germany's economic takeover of East Germany. The fable goes something like this: ...
  • Hot Couples

    Virginia Gov. L. Douglas Wilder and former nude model-turned-socialite Pat Kluge. Wilder says he and Kluge are just "friends." But Kluge, separated from her billionaire husband, John Kluge, and Wilder, who is divorced, have reportedly weekended together on Nantucket, on Maryland's Eastern Shore and at Virginia Beach. Wilder earlier this year named Kluge, a high-school dropout, to the University of Virginia's Board of Visitors. The Kluges, who now live in separate houses on the same estate, were Wilder's chief campaign contributors.
  • The 10 Most Obscure Congressmen

    The congressional newspaper Roll Call recently picked the Hill's 10 most invisible congressmen. Heading the list is GOP Rep. Clarence Miller of Ohio who Roll Call says is virtually unknown--despite 23 years in Congress. The others: Herb Bateman (R-Va.), immersed in legislative detail.Robert Borski (D-Pa.),immersed in favors for home folksJoe Early (D-Mass.), who recently held his first press conference.Charles Hatcher (D-Ga); Tip O'Neill once said he'd never heard of him.Dennis Hertel (D-Mich.) backs losers for chairmanships.Ray McGrath (R-N.Y.), a former phys-ed teacher.Henry Nowak (D-N.Y.), interested in protecting Buffalo.Richard Schulze (R-Pa.), interested in protecting mushroom growers.French Slaughter (R-Va.), uninterested in any public speaking.
  • Aftershocks In Teheran

    For survivors of the earthquake that killed nearly 40,000 people in Iran and the West European rescuers who flocked to help them, relief efforts sometimes became an exercise in mutual incomprehension. Burrowing through the rubble with their high-tech equipment, search teams were puzzled by the resignation of rural Persians, most of whom passionately mourned their martyred dead but quickly gave up hope of finding anyone buried alive. In Manjil, where 90 percent of all dwellings were leveled, a British team arrived at a house where a missing girl was said to be buried. They dug in with their bare hands. The child's uncle began his own search--for money. He rummaged through books, tossed aside a poster of the Ayatollah Khomeini, and finally extracted a case of papers and cash. When the British found his niece's body, the uncle simply asked if somebody else could dispose of her. ...
  • Wisconsin Is Talking...

    About fallen dairy princess Lori Esker, convicted in the "moomoo murder" of killing the fiancee of her former boyfriend. The 20-year-old Esker, Marathon County's reigning dairy princess until her arrest last September, was found guilty of using a belt to strangle Lisa Cihaski, 21, in the parking lot of a Howard Johnson Motor Lodge. Trial testimony disclosed Esker killed Cihaski to prevent her from marrying dairy farmer Bill Buss, 26. The murder has embarrassed state dairymen. "It's unfortunate the industry gets a black eye in the situation," said Dan Borschke, president of the Wisconsin Dairy Council.
  • Delays And Dollars

    Blurred vision is the most recent obstacle encountered by the Hubble Space Telescope since Congress first funded it in 1977. Budgetary and managerial woes--as well as bad luck--have plagued the 13-ton instrument from the start. ...
  • Singh For His Supper

    Who's sari now? Not Peter Singh, a Pakistani-born Elvis wannabe. When he's not running a carry-out food shop in Wales, Singh croons cross-cultural originals like "My Popadum Told Me," "Bhindi Bhaji Boogie" and "RockingWith the Sikh" to rapt Londoners. Singh got his inspiration from the King himself, who appeared to him in a dream and passed the mantle. Now, says Singh, "I don't smoke dope. I don't drink bourbon. All I want to do is shake my turban."
  • Acting Frisky At Comiskey

    The Chicago Cubs used to be the team of the trendy. Celebrities, an ex-president included, did play by play. Bryant Gumbel and George Will were avid fans. Even the ballpark was perfect: with its ivy-draped brick, it had a certain collegiate panache. But no longer. The hot ticket in Chicago this season isn't the fifth-place Cubs, it's the White--hot Sox. That's right, the White Sox--the humble team from the South Side, the team that once took the field in shorts, for God's sake--last week grabbed the lead in the American League West. ...
  • A Bigger Bite For The George

    The town fathers of Kennebunkport, Maine, home of George Bush's summer White House, have solved a problem the president has been unable to manage. They're cutting the tax rates but taking more out of the taxpayers" wallets. Since land values in the area have more than doubled over the past eight years, the latest assessment on Bush's compound has soared to $2.2 million, from $892,000 in 1982. Even at the new rate of $11 per $1,000 valuation (down from $22.40), Bush will owe $23,20--up from $17,832 last year.
  • Fans, Start Your Engines

    Summer movies are nothing if not fun so let's have some fun with Days of Thun. den This is the one in which Tom Cruise plays a race-car driver on the NASCAR (stock car) circuit. So why is his name Cole Trickle? This is worth thinking about, especially since Cruise himself is credited with I the story, along with screenwriter Robert Towne. Why would a sex bomb like Cruise want to be called Trickle? Sounds more like an oil leak. His erstwhile rival and eventual buddy (played by Michael Rooker) is called Rowdy Burns--now there's the quintessential race driver's moniker. ...
  • French Revolution, Family Style

    The collapse of socialism has brought Europe into a postrevolutionary age. Louis: Malle's May Fools can be called the first postrevolutionary comedy. It takes place in May 1968, when the left-wing student demonstrations in Paris were shaking all of France. In Malle's delicious film those events are reflected and parodied in the hurried reunion of a family in the wine country of the southwest. The octogenarian matriarch, Madame Vieuzac (Paulette Dubost), suddenly dies, leaving her estate in the care of her dreamy 60-year-old son Milou (.Michel Piccoli). Promptly, several generations of Vieuzacs converge on the family villa. As the radio blares out ominous bulletins on the political upheavals in the cities, the family spars and spats about the disposal of the estate. Since the local gravediggers have caught the anarchic fever, the body of Madame Vienzac goes unburied. She becomes a kind of ironic spirit, surveying the mini-revolution in her fractious family. ...
  • A Princess For The People

    It was a joining of many kinds: old and new,elegant and simple, man and woman. When Prince Aya(second son of Emperor Akihito) and his college friend, a commoner, Kiko Kawashima, were married last week on the grounds of the Imperial Palace in Tokyo, the nation rejoiced. Here was a couple anyone could love. Princess Kiko and the newly named Prince Akishino will live in a modest home. They will continue their studies: she in social psychology, he in catfish. If there was any unhappiness at all, it was only Japanese sorrow that the heir to the throne, Crown Prince Naruhito, remains a bachelor.
  • Someone's Last Hurrah

    The Communist Party official has six telephones on his desk, a traditional sign of rank in Moscow. They used to ring constantly with calls from the party's Central Committee. But no one there has called him in the three months since Mikhail Gorbachev began shifting power from the party to a new executive presidency. The official is so bitter about being cut out of the decision-making process that he breaks longstanding Soviet practice and criticizes his party leader by name to a foreign visitor. "Gorbachev is now a one-man show," he says. "He and a few personal advisers make all the decisions." The visitor asks for examples of botched decisions. "Show me where something is working right these days," the official replies. ...
  • Waiter! Get Me A Picture Phone And A Fax!

    It looks like the setting for a power lunch. But inside Electronic Cafe International in Santa Monica, Calif., you can get a lot more than a cup of espresso and a piece of quiche. How about a fax from India, or a teleconference call from London? Located in Santa Monica's 18th Street Arts Complex, Cafe International is more than an eatery; it's the latest wrinkle in global communications facilities. ...
  • Rjr Tries To Salvage Its Junk

    Was it only last year that financier Henry Kravis and his partners borrowed a whopping $28 billion to buy R JR Nabisco in the biggest leveraged buyout in history? It seems like an age--namely, the age of excessive debt. Now, only 17 months later, the landscape is littered with casualties of overborrowing--Robert Campeau, Merv Griffin, Donald Trump. Kravis, whose name became synonymous with leveraged buyouts in the go-go 1980s, seems determined to avoid the same fate. Adapting to the pay-as-you-go 1990s, Kohlberg Kravis Roberts is planning to put IWR on a sounder financial footing. The firm indicated that it would I plow $1 .7 billion of new equity into the food and tobacco giant and retire some $4 billion of high-yield junk bonds. Said a Shearson Lehman Hutton trader, "It's the official end of the junk-bond era." ...
  • A White-Male Lament

    You know us. We're everywhere and we drive you crazy. We turn up where you work, at parties and next to you in airplanes. We're the ones who debate the merits of leaf blowers, comparison shop for car polishes and file every warranty for every purchase. We're the ones who can't clap to the beat, who wear awkward smiles, the kind of guys you hope won't try to start a conversation. We're BMCWM--boring, middle-class white men. How did so many of us wind up so boring Well, we didn't ask to be this way. Being boring is a role thrust upon us. ...
  • A Home Away From Home

    Every morning except Sundays, Dorothy Frutiger kisses her husband, Dick, goodbye and watches as he boards the van to the Cedar Acres Adult Day Care Center in Janesville, Wis. It's a long drive--30 miles--and Dick spends the time chatting with the other passengers who are still able to respond. Lately, he's taken to consoling a younger man, an Alzheimer's victim like himself, who doesn't like the idea of adult day care. A lot of the conversation seems nonsensical; some sentences stop in midthought. But the effort helps keep their minds active. And what is the alternative? Though he's only 62, Dick Frutiger would be watching TV in a nursing home if not for Cedar Acres. "He gets better care there than he would at home," says Dorothy, 58, who works full time as a typesetter. ...
  • The Nixons Go For The Gold

    Richard and Pat Nixon met in 1938, when both landed parts in an amateur production of George S. Kaufman's "The Dark Tower." Watergate reporters Woodward and Bernstein later wrote that the Nixons had a loveless marriage. Maybe so, but last week they celebrated their 50th anniversary. It was a quiet family affair, the only social splash was made by the Nixon grandkids in the swimming pool.
  • Piece De Resistance

    On June 18,1940, Gen. Charles de Gaulle launched the valiant French Resistance movement with a stirring radio broadcast from London, urging French people to continue the struggle against the Nazi forces. Last week France marked the 50th anniversary of the broadcast with a startling temporary monument in Paris. A team of 21 artists painted a gigantic replica of the popular 1940s DucretetThomson radio and wrapped the canvas around the renowned Obelisk in the Place de la Concorde. World War II speeches poured from nearby speakers--and then the creation was dismantled, and the radio days were over.
  • No Common Ground

    Abortion: The Clash of Absolutes. By Laurence H. Tribe. 270pages. Norton. $19.95. ...
  • To Russia, With Movie Deals

    The movie is pure Hollywood thriller, complete with a leaking nuclear reactor, panicking townspeople and an allstar cast, including Jon Voight and Jason Robards. But as filming began last month on "The Final Warning," a re-creation of the 1986 Chernobyl meltdown, the real drama was the choice of location. Cast and crew assembled before a nuclear plant in Kruchatov, 300 miles south of Moscow. In an unprecedented deal made possible by glasnost, the Soviet government has teamed with Carolco--best known, ironically, for financing the anti-communist Rambo pictures--to make the $4 million movie for Turner Network Television. ...