Newsweek Staff

Stories by Newsweek Staff

  • To Russia, With Movie Deals

    The movie is pure Hollywood thriller, complete with a leaking nuclear reactor, panicking townspeople and an allstar cast, including Jon Voight and Jason Robards. But as filming began last month on "The Final Warning," a re-creation of the 1986 Chernobyl meltdown, the real drama was the choice of location. Cast and crew assembled before a nuclear plant in Kruchatov, 300 miles south of Moscow. In an unprecedented deal made possible by glasnost, the Soviet government has teamed with Carolco--best known, ironically, for financing the anti-communist Rambo pictures--to make the $4 million movie for Turner Network Television. ...
  • Bad Time For Terrorists

    Colleagues at East Germany's People's Geothermic Enterprise knew the nondescript record keeper as "Dieter Lenz." During seven years in the plant's record-keeping department, Lenz worked odd hours and kept to himself. But the quiet 31-year-old allegedly had a violent past. Last week East German police took him away in handcuffs. They charged that he is really Henning Beer, a top entry on West Germany's most-wanted list as a suspected member of the Red Army Faction (RAF) terrorist gang. He was one of 10 RAF suspects arrested in East Germany in the last two weeks. A German investigative reporter noticed that during three RAF attacks, including the murder of Deutsche Bank chairman Alfred Herrhausen last fall, Dieter Lenz happened to be on vacation. ...
  • Fixing The 'Between'

    When it first appeared three decades ago, the field of family therapy was considered revolutionary for its view of the family as as "system" in which members collide with one another in predictable ways. Today family theraphy is undergoing a small revolution of its own. Spurred by feminists in its midst, the profession is being forced to re-examined its persistent sexual stereotyping of family members--a tendency all the more curious in a brand of theraphy that all places heavy emphasis on gender roles. One of the more familiar, and problematic, family constellations, for instance, is the so-called persuader-distancer couple, consisting of an "over-involved" mother and an "unavailable' father who between them, stir up a witch's brew offamily tensions. Such concepts have come under attack by feminist who believe that a mother's expressive way are somehow being turned into a liability by therapist. ...
  • Not-So-Square Squires

    In the peerage of pop, British rocker Roger Daltrey is already royalty. Beyond the bandstand, though, the lead singer for The Who has found a place in an entirely separate Who's Who: he's become a country gentleman. The good Mr. Daltrey is the proud owner of a comfortable estate near the English village of Burwash--and not shy about it. For a recent American Express ad, he strolled around his private lake doing the famous, "Do you know me?" routine dressed in a Barbour jacket, cloth hat and Wellingtons. "I run this trout fishery," says the man who made millions singing "We won't get fooled again." He then makes his way . . . not to a limo, but a Land Rover. ...
  • How The West Was Tamed

    As Petruchio, Morgan Freeman is a true cowboy suitor in the New York Shakespeare Festival's frontier version of "The Taming of the Shrew." The production, set in the old Southwest, began previews in Central Park last week. Ever the deadeye, Freeman uses a lasso to tame the prairie virago Kate (Tracey Ullman). "She's someone I know," says Ullman. "She's 40, intelligent, witty but has no man because there's no one to match her." Freeman "may think he's tamed me," she adds, "but I don't think he really has."
  • Keeping The Pressure On President Bush

    Keep the pressure on," chanted the adoring throngs after Nelson Mandela stepped off a jetliner in New York last week and invoked the main theme of his six-week, 14-nation tour. The demand raised questions all but forgotten since the emotional sanctions debate of 1986: how much pressure, and for how long The South African government was hoping for a reward for its relaxation of political repression, including Mandela's release. Pretoria may soon meet the legal test that would enable President Bush to begin lifting U.S. economic sanctions, the most stringent imposed by any of South Africa's major trading partners. But Mandela insists sanctions should stay "until fundamental and irreversible changes take place"--and that will take years, at best. "[South African President F. W.] de Klerk has done nothing," Mandela said. "What are you rewarding him for?" ...
  • Mandela

    At a historic crossroads in Harlem Nelson Mandela staked his claim. One by one, he invoked the black heroes and martyrs whose words had echoed there before him: Marcus Garvey, Paul Robeson, Adam Clayton Powell Jr., Malcolm X, Martin Luther King Jr. There were perhaps 100,000 people pressed against the barricades, filling the streets in all four directions from the platform, and the roar swelled louder as each of the great names sounded. "I am here to claim you because ... you have claimed our struggle," Mandela said. "Harlem signifies the glory of resistance. We are on the verge of victory ... Death to racism! " That brought the loudest roar of all, a mighty ovation in the gathering dusk.With his regal bearing, his smiling serenity and his unbroken spirit after 27 years in South African prisons, Mandela was an authentic heir to the heroes' mantle. And in New York last week, the Harlem rally, a ticker-tape parade, a United Nations address and an ecstatic, chanting celebration in...
  • Congress: The Flag Boosters Get Burned

    George Bush and the GOP's congressional leadership had hoped to fete the Fourth of July with the first step toward a new-and-improved Bill of Rights. But last week the House of Representatives rained on their parade, defeating a proposed constitutional amendment to ban desecration of the American flag. For several days, congressmen debated the issue with a mix of passion and parody. While Illinois Rep. Henry J. Hyde invoked people who "paid for [the flag] with their blood," Rep. Gary L. Ackerman of New York displayed items with a flag motif, including panty hose and garbage bags. "How about American flag napkins?" said Ackerman. "What if you blow your nose in one? Have you broken the law?" ...
  • An Unusual Call From A Listener

    Geraldo should jump all over this one. During a radio talk show in New Orleans last week, noted sex therapist Dr. Judith Kuriansky instructed a female caller to give her inattentive husband "a real big ultimatum to push him off his chair." To which the caller replied, "Why don't you take your hand and push him off the chair. He's sitting two feet from you." The caller was Marilou Hunter, wife of the show's host, Ron Hunter. That night Marilou, 32, was fatally shot as she lay in bed with her husband. Hunter, 51, told police he awoke to find his wife bleeding from a self-inflicted chest wound. Beside her was Hunter's gun. For the record, Marilou accused Ron of physical abuse in one of the two separation suits she filed in the last two years. Hunter denied the claim and said she beat him. No charges have been filed in the death, pending a coroner's report, expected soon.
  • Can This Marriage Be Saved?

    Quebec was preparing for the feast of the shepherd Jean Baptiste, the province's patron saint. For the first time since 1969, when separatist violence marred the celebration, a parade was scheduled; children would ride through the streets of Montreal in a float shaped like a lamb three stories high. Last week the lamb stood outside the fold. Prime Minister Brian Mulroney pronounced dead his six-year campaign to resolve a long-running constitutional crisis by reconciling French Quebec with English Canada. "Just because the sheep is an animal that has a reputation for following, we don't want to be ashamed of it," said Robert Gariepy, a volunteer organizer in Montreal. "We want to be proud of and show the positive direction we're taking with our country." ...
  • Taking Up Arms Against Aids

    Police riot squads are not a common sight at scientific meetings. But the Sixth International Conference on AIDS, held in San Francisco last week was special. Activists--many of whose lives now depend on the pace of scientific progress--were expected to outnumber the 12,000 conference delegates by 10 to one. The activists were angry, and local officials braced for the worst. In addition to the usual dining and sightseeing tips, the press kits handed out to arriving reporters included a letter from the chief of police, explaining what to do "if you find yourself within a group of demonstrators that is to be dispersed by crowd control officers" and "circumstances do not permit escape." ...
  • From 'Donald Ducks' To 'Trump: The Joke'

    It was getting to be like the Perils of Pauline. Would Donald Trump get a reprieve with a last-minute loan package? Would he show up headlines like DONALD DUCKS by making debt payments befora Tuesday's deadline? And lurking over those questions was an even bigger one: was the renowned dealmaker in danger of becoming: Trump: TheJoke? ...
  • Found: Man's Newest Furry Cousin

    Biologists can be an existential bunch: to them, no species exists until a scientist describes it. For centuries the coastal fishermen of the Brazilian barrier island Superaqui took for granted the caras pretas, or black-faced monkeys, playing on their roofs and gamboling in the seaside brush. Last year zoologist Dante Martins Teixeira of the National Museum in Rio de Janeiro met a Superaqui native who told him about the squirrel-size monkeys who had golden manes like lions and black tails, forearms and faces. Two of Martins's colleagues from Brazil's Capao da Imbuia Natural History Museum spent a month on the island observing the monkeys in the wild. The creatures were too cunning and fast for the camera, but the biologists did bring back a preserved skin given to them by a fisherman. After close scrutiny, the Brazilians announced last week that they had "discovered" a new primate species, Leontopithecus caissara, or black-faced lion tamarin. If they're right, the creature is a...
  • Hailing A Hero--And Looking For Our Own

    Everywhere Nelson Mandela went in New York last week, black folks brought their kids. Parents led them through the downtown crowds to watch the ticker-tape parade; they carried them on their shoulders during the tour of Harlem; they kept them up until almost midnight at the rally in Yankee Stadium. Thousands saw it as a once-in-a-lifetime chance to expose children to someone they could hold up as a true black hero. The images were moving--but they pointed up a conspicuous irony. Many African-Americans now seem to feel far more passionately about Mandela than they do about any black leaders here in this country. ...
  • Eco-Activist Summer

    With few noisy clashes and a crowd of about 500, it was something less than the dramatic curtain raiser many had expected. But last week's antilogging demonstration at Louisiana-Pacific's Samoa mill, just west of Eureka, Calif. at least laid down the lines for "Redwood Summer"--a season of civil disobedience just beginning in the timber country of northern California. On one side of the road leading into the mill, supporters of the radical environmental group Earth First. "There's no time left to try to work through legal measures," demonstrator Chris Robinson said. "You also have to get out and do some grass-roots activism." On the other side, working people whose livelihoods depend on the logging business. Secretary Kim Lennon-Bailey clocked out of the Louisiana-Pacific mill around lunchtime, picked up a picket sign reading MY KIDS ARE MY FUTURE and joined the pro-logging, antiprotester contingent. "I believe in my job and I believe in this area," she said. ...
  • Hackers Of The World, Unite!

    As the Feds widen their crackdown on computer tampering, some pioneers of the industry have joined to defend freedom of the keyboard ...
  • Fine Art Or Foul?

    The Rev. Donald Wildmon stood one day in the Galleria dell' Accademia in Florence contemplating Michelangelo's "David." What he saw was a figure in white marble, towering 14 feet above him. What he felt was awe. He felt different the day he saw Andres Serrano's "Piss Christ," a photo of a plastic crucifix immersed in urine--and learned that the National Endowment for the Arts had indirectly supported the artist. "Congress has enough sense to give money to fund art, but they don't have enough sense to know what kind of art they are funding," he thought. "That's weirdo." ...
  • A Slow Slide Toward War?

    Civilians would have been the target," George Bush said last week, explaining his decision to break off talks with the Palestine Liberation Organization in the wake of a failed Palestinian terrorist raid on Israel's coastline. The suspension was meant to underscore U.S. abhorrence of terrorism. But it also reflected a deeper concern: in the tinderbox of the Middle East, such a raid could lead to conflagration. What if the May 30 attack had succeeded and taken scores of civilian lives? Would Israel take revenge by attacking Libya, an apparent sponsor of the raid? Would Libyan leader Muammar Kaddafi call on Iraqi President Saddam Hussein to keep his promise to retaliate on behalf of his Arab brothers? Iraq might launch just "a few missiles" against Israeli targets, says Israeli terrorism expert Ariel Merari. Israel would be forced to respond. "Then you have a war," Merari says. "In the Middle East ... when the atmosphere is so belligerent, you don't need much." ...
  • Matchup

    She is not a nightmare yet," said Steffi Graf of 16-year-old Monica Seles, but Seles is certainly waking up women's tennis. With her double-fisted, double-grunting style, the young Yugoslavian beat Graf in straight sets at the French Open, becoming the youngest to win the title. She's even challenging Graf in the glamour department. But when Wimbledon begins next week, the sweatbands go back on.
  • The Trump Debt Crisis

    Remember this bit of history? Flush with petrodollars, the big U.S. banks loaned lavishly to Latin American and other Third World countries in the 1970s. As oil and commodity prices dropped, countries like Mexico and Brazil couldn't pay back the loans. So the banks threw more money at them, hoping the problem would somehow work itself out. Instead the countries just got mired in a deeper hole, and so did the banks. ...
  • No More Cash

    Soviet citizens are finding it easier to travel abroad, but an upcoming government ruling may cramp their style once they reach their destinations. This summer, Moscow will stop providing up to $200 to travelers at the tourist exchange rate (6.2 rubles for $1). The service is indispensable since it's illegal to take rubles outside the country, but Moscow can't afford the cash outflow any more. Future travelers will have to rely on the generosity of foreign friends and relatives because they'll be penniless when they arrive.
  • Euro-Manners

    Here's a fresh angle on the New Europe. French extreme rightist Jean-Marie Le Pen and an associate swapped insults, spittle and blows to the groin last week with a Belgian socialist in the cafeteria of the European Parliament in Strasbourg. The brawl erupted after Robert Krieps, a socialist from Luxembourg, asked a group of lunching right-wingers if a speech that morning by Nelson Mandela had ruined their appetites. "Who's this dog?" asked Le Pen, according to press reports. Jose Happart, a Belgian socialist accompanying Krieps, told Le Pen to "go to hell." Le Pen spat at Happart and the brawl ensued.
  • Value Judgments

    With the exception of veterans and schoolchildren, few Americans normally pause to I observe Flag Day. But this year the nation's attention was riveted on Old Glory. Last week the Supreme Court struck down a federal flag protection law, ruling 6 to 4 that although the desecration is offensive, it is a form of expression protected by the First Amendment. "Punishing desecration of the flag dilutes the very freedom that makes this emblem so revered, and worth revering," Justice William Brennan wrote for the majority. George Bush, who rode into office wrapped in the Stars and Stripes, immediately issued a call for a constitutional amendment banning desecration of the flag. As the GOP leadership jumped on the bandwagon--and Democrats played for time--amendment legislation began advancing through Congress. A House floor vote could come this week--the initial step in the campaign to alter the Bill of Rights for the first time in its 199-year history (page 18). ...
  • Pam's Bash

    It's LIVE FROM THE KENNEDY CENTER with Pamela Harriman! Plus Crosby, Stills and Nash, Gladys Knight, Rodney Crowell, the Gypsy Kings and "Saturday Night Live's" Dana Carvey doing his impersonation of George Bush. Harriman hopes to raise $1.2 million for the Democratic Party with a gala at the center this week. Harriman sought advice from singer Paul Simon. who suggested SNL producer Lorne Michaels. "I have a background in the theater and lots of friends," says Harriman. The center had been off-limits to political fund raising until last year, when President Bush and the GOP changed the rules. Now Democrats have the stage.
  • Barry: The Mayor's Last-Ditch Strategy?

    My ego is gone now," said Washington Mayor Marion Barry last week. "There was a time ... I would have said, "I don't care if I get five votes, I'm going to run'." While jury selection for his trial on 14 perjury and cocaine-related charges continued, Barry, 54, went into a television studio to record a 12-minute speech. The mayor's message: he would not seek a fourth term this fall. When the speech was broadcast, it settled one burning question. But Barry's withdrawal raised new speculation about his upcoming trial, the mayoral campaign--and the volatile race relations in the nation's capital. ...
  • Here Come The Mob And Van Gogh

    What's hot in Hollywood now that "Dick Tracy" has been released? The mob is making a big comeback. The making of"The Godfather, Part III" has been well reported, but there are at least four other gangster films in production: "Miller's Crossing," with Albert Finney; "GoodFellas," a Martin Scorsese film, starring Robert De Niro, based on "Wiseguy" by Nick Pileggi "The Krays," about twin hoods who terrorized Britain in the 1960s, and "State of Grace" (its working title), with Sean Penn and Ed Harris. U.S. fans can also look forward to a rush of foreign films about Vincent van Gogh, honoring this year's 100th anniversary of his death. Among them: "Vincent & Theo," a Robert Altman movie already shown on European TV; "Vincent and Me," a Canadian film about a 12-year-old girl's sketches sold to the Japanese as van Gogh's newly discovered childhood drawings, and Akira Kurosawa's "Dreams," featuring director Scorsese as van Gogh.
  • Thoughts On Mayor Barry

    What do Genghis Khan, Richard Nixon, J. Edgar Hoover and D.C. Mayor Marion Barry have in common? We don't have all day, so I will tell you: they all were / are historic figures who did some good along with their much more famous bad and thus are a pain in the neck to analyze. ...
  • Silver-Haired Athletes Reaching For The Gold

    A male midlife crisis used to be a condition characterized by the pursuit of leggy showgirls and the wearing of toupees. No one would think of buying a ticket to see a man in such a pathetic state. But last week a 43-year-old Texan faced a truly compelling crisis--how to pitch to the best team in baseball, the Oakland Athletics. And he survived it in exemplary style: by hurling a no-hitter. The Rangers' Nolan Ryan is the oldest person ever to pull off that feat--but he is hardly the only middle-aged man to muscle his way into the sports pages of late. From California (where Mark Spitz, 40, is trying to swim his way into the 1992 Olympics) to New York (where jockey Angel Cordero, 47, boots home winners at Belmont Park), silver-haired athletes are going for the gold. Some, such as golfer Jack Nicklaus and bowler Earl Anthony, have dabbled in the senior circuit, a kind of parallel universe where everyone wears Sansabelt slacks. But despite what science says about the body converting...
  • No Bailout For Gorb?

    It now seems very unlikely that a "Second Marshall Plan" for the Soviet Union will be approved at next month's economic summit in Houston. At a final strategy session last week, West German foreign-policy adviser Horst Teltschik urged his fellow "sherpas"--the advisers from the United States, Canada, Japan, France, Britain, Italy and the European Community, who are carrying the load for summit planning--to back a $20 billion bailout for Mikhail Gorbachev. Bonn, Teltschik said, was willing to bear more than its share of the burden for payments to maintain Soviet troops in East Germany and credit guarantees for the crumbling Soviet economy. In Bonn's view, the plan would ensure Soviet support for keeping Germany in NATO--and help keep Gorbachev in control. Washington argued it couldn't afford the plan and the others argued that a heavy investment at this time would be risky because of uncertainty about Gorbachev's future.
  • A Wall Of Water Washes Through Ohio

    Nine-year-old Amber Colvin was playing cards with her friend Kerrie Trigg when the house began to fill up with water. It was late evening, and a series of rogue thunderstorms had just dumped five and a half inches of rain on the Ohio-West Virginia border region below Wheeling, W.Va. Wegee Creek, normally a placid stream, was rising to almost unbelievable heights, and Amber and Kerrie climbed into a bathtub for protection from the swirling water. Then the house collapsed. Before long, Amber found herself swept downstream into the Ohio River. Somehow she survived by clinging to two logs. "I had them for a long time," she said afterward. "I just drifted." ...