Newsweek Staff

Stories by Newsweek Staff

  • Tough Tactics By Ex-Troublemakers

    Call it poetic justice. Czechoslovakia's Communists used to round up opposition troublemakers before important national events. Now the troublemakers are in power, and last week, two days before the country's first free election in 44 years, police investigating corruption and "other criminal activities" pulled in half a dozen hard-line Communist leaders for questioning. They included former president Gustav Husak and party chief Milos Jakes. The next day, the government of Vaclav Havel accused the leader of another rival political party of being a secret-police informer, seriously damaging its chances on the eve of the all-important vote. ...
  • Nintendo And Beyond

    With flashy graphics, dazzling sound and ever-zippier software, the leader in video games--and its two chief rivals, NEC and Sega--looks to the future ...
  • Trump: The Fall

    Once a symbol of cocky '80s wealth, Donald Trump is now tarnished by marital scandal, mired in debt and negotiating with banks to retain control of his empire. Even if he succeeds, the Trump "mystique' may never recover. ...
  • High Style And Low Comedy

    The misadvantage of Mr. Wilt is incredible. What's incredible is that this brand of repressed, dotty, English humor is still around. You would have thought the anarchic Monty Python gang would have blown away the kind of comedy once exemplified by Terry-Thomas, Ian Carmichael and the "Carry On" movies. Even more incredible is that I like this sort of humor. The sort where the thickheaded cop, Inspector Flint, grilling an innocent man, shoves a bunch of papers at him and says: "Did you write this, Mr. Wilt?" Wilt: "Yes, I did." Cop: "Don't try to deny it, Mr. Wilt." As David Letterman would say, that's comedy. ...
  • The Champion Of Passion

    D. H. Lawrence.By Jeffrey Meyers.446 pages. Knopf. $24.95.As the tide favoring censorship of the arts rises once more in this country, a new life of D. H. Lawrence takes on a certain poignancy. Lawrence was only 44 when tuberculosis felled him in 1930, but like James Joyce he's one of the great survivors of our century's frequent government-versus-art conflicts. In 1915 the British government, unprepared for candor about lesbianism and women's sexual desires, suppressed "The Rainbow." In 1929, the police closed down an exhibition of Lawrence's paintings, and from 1928 to 1960, customs officials on both sides of the Atlantic protected decent folk from "Lady Chatterley's Lover."It's hard to think of another modern novelist who preached loving life as incessantly as did this coal miner's son, yet he was constantly battered by it. Weak as a boy and often ill as a man, Lawrence was so dominated by his mother that during her life he could never love another woman. Later, feeling that...
  • Ivana: Success Is The Best Revenge

    It is dinner time in the atrium of The Plaza hotel. Darla Welsh, chaperon for a high-school prom group from Tenafly, N.J., is busy surveying the splendor: vaulted ceilings, crystal chandeliers, palm trees all around. "Beautiful," exclaims Welsh, who is decked out in a black taffeta gown with a huge white bow. But what are she and her students really dying to see? "We're hoping to catch a glimpse of Ivana," she says. ...
  • The Rusk Family War--And Peace

    The diplomat sits behind a professor's desk, an old man in a gray suit and maroon tie, working quietly under photographs of John F. Kennedy and Lyndon Baines Johnson. The trucker sits behind the wheel of an International tractor-trailer, a young man in a sweat-stained cap, T shirt and work pants, hauling cigarettes, candy and soda pop across the South. Both men are Rusks. Dean, the father, helped design and defend a conflict in Southeast Asia that killed 57,000 Americans and more than 1 million Vietnamese. Richard, the son, has spent the past 20 years brooding over how such a decent man could have ensnared himself in such a lousy war. Now they have collaborated on a fine exercise in reminiscence and self-redemption: As I Saw It (672pages. Norton. $29. 95), an honorable, no-apologies defense of Dean Rusk's career--and America's lost crusade in Vietnam. ...
  • How To Succeed In Show Business--Again

    During his complicated makeup for "Tru," Robert Morse's wavy hair disappears under a plastic skull cap. "That's my head condom," he lisps, already into the voice of Truman Capote. It's a joke the late author and social butterfly would have cackled at. The lisp, the cackle, the whine, the snorts, coughs and guffaws of Capote are part of a brilliant and poignant performance in Jay Presson Allen's one-man play. It won Morse, 69, what was clearly the most popular of the Tony Awards as best leading actor. ...
  • Poetry Redux

    It's been 41 years since the Library of Congress awarded a national poetry prize (the 1948 prize to pro-Fascist Ezra Pound caused Congress to put the award on ice). But the ban has been lifted, and in October the library will present the first Rebekah Johnson Bobbitt Prize. It's in memory of LBJ's sister, a poetry lover.
  • Hey, Dad, Want To Play Slime World?

    The ultimate video-game battlefield may be the back seat of the family car. Handheld video games are already available from Nintendo and Atari. By Christmas NEC will introduce an even more sophisticated version that can double as a handheld television set. ...
  • The Doctor's Suicide Van

    Sometimes, when ethical debates have run on interminably, it takes a shocking incident to sear the old questions back into the public consciousness. So it was with the case of the Oregon grandmother, the Detroit pathologist and his homemade suicide machine. She was diagnosed as having Alzheimer's disease--and preferred taking her life to slowly losing the mind she cherished. He was a zealot who had searched for an appropriate patient to try his controversial device. Janet Adkins read a short item about Jack Kevorkian in NEWSWEEK last fall and saw him on the "Donahue" show. She and her husband flew 2,000 miles to meet him and discuss his device over dinner. Last Monday, while her husband waited at a nearby hotel, they drove to a suburban campsite in Kevorkian's rusty Volkswagen van. He inserted a needle in her arm and started saline flowing. She pressed a button on his death machine that first sent a sedative, then deadly potassium chloride racing to her heart. ...
  • An Opening To The East?

    Germany: in or out? That is the question. Will the Soviets accept a united Germany inside NATO? After the Washington summit between George Bush and Mikhail Gorbachev, U.S. officials were discouraged. The Soviets were stonewalling. "The only ideas they offered were nonstarters like a Germany in both pacts, or airy-fairy visions of a PanEuropean security order . . . To our suggestions, they simply said nyet," said a U.S. official. But now the Soviets are signaling readiness to deal--without holding unification hostage to their security fears. "For the first time, rather than questioning the fact of Germany in NATO. the Soviets seem to be exploring ways to dress it up and sell it," said a U.S. official. ...
  • Getting The Farmers To Kick The Habit

    W. D. Guthrie's grandfather smoked and chewed tobacco, mostly at the same time, for 90-some years before dying at 104. So Guthrie, a second-generation tobacco grower in Newport, N.C., doesn't buy the arguments against smoking. The evidence that does impress him is that tobacco pays. "There's a rule of thumb down here," Guthrie says. "For every 10 acres of corn you plant, you better plant one acre of tobacco to back it up." ...
  • A Rupture?

    Palestine Liberation Organization officials in Tunis fear Washington will suspend contacts with the PLO, perhaps as early as next week. Despite repeated appeals from the Bush administration, PLO chairman Yasir Arafat is unlikely to denounce the May 30 raid on Israel by an extremist PLO faction and risk further fragmenting the organization, the sources say. Political pressure is mounting for a U.S. rupture with the PLO. The White House has withstood pressure for sanctions against China and the Soviet Union over Lithuania and wants to continue the dialogue with the PLO, but the strength of Israel's friends in the United States may make it impossible to avoid at least a temporary break.
  • In Italy: 'The Injustice Of A Nation'

    Last week's funeral of 3-year-old Miriam Schillaci was a moment of public remorse. The ceremony was broadcast nationwide; thousands of Italians sent flowers to the family. President Francesco Cossiga lamented "the injustice of a nation and the suffering it has caused you." ...
  • Testing For Alzheimer's

    To doctors specializing in Alzheimer's disease, it was no surprise that Janet Adkins could still beat her son at tennis, yet could no longer play the piano. An Alzheimer's victim is like a city under prolonged artillery attack: the power plants may be failing, but the buses still run. Typically, the disease first affects memory and the ability to learn, then language skills and motor coordination. By the end--anywhere from three to 20 years after its onset--most patients are mute and uncomprehending. But there are many things they can still do before that vegetative state sets in. "These functions aren't lost at the same rate," explains Dr. David Bennett, clinical director of the Alzheimer's Disease Center at Chicago's Rush Presbyterian St. Luke's Medical Center. "We have some patients who are severely impaired, and yet they're still able to drive or play a good game of golf." ...
  • Saying Yes To Taxes

    In California, voters had plenty of time to think about the legacy of the Great Tax Revolt they began back in 1978. As they sat in their cars, stuck in bumper-to-bumper traffflc on the state's congested freeways, they could contemplate the consequences of spending less per capita on transportation than any other state in the union. As their frustration rose, their eyes wandered, perhaps, to roadside billboards that asked, HAD ENOUGH TRAFFIC? VOTE YES ON 111. ...
  • Got A Right To Sing The Blues

    Basin Street of New Orleans is the subject of a fabled jazz standard. But these days, piano-playing prodigy Harry Connick Jr. might be more inclined to sing the blues of another thoroughfare in his native city--Poydras Street, site of the federal courthouse. There, this week, his father-the district attorney for the Big Easy since 1974--faces trial on charges that he aided an illegal gambling operation. At 22, Harry Connick Jr.-- with a Grammy, a gold record and a British film debut this fall-has the world at his feet. At 64, Harry Connick Sr. could face 25 years in the pokey and the end of his political career. ...
  • Gorbachev: The Price Of Survival

    I have never encountered a Soviet delegation so tentative as the one that accompanied Gorbachev to Washington. Some of its members seemed nonplussed by the collapse of the Communist Party Others appeared torn between the familiar contours of central planning and the potential attractions of market economics. The head of the central planning agency lost command of his English when asked how his office was going to coordinate with the market sector, then did not seek to hide his irritation about this state of affairs. On the situation in Europe, they offered a series of complaints, fears and speculations. But these had a plaintive quality, as if they hoped America would rescue them from the consequences of their actions. ...
  • Hot Summer For Moscow

    Welcome home, comrade president: Mikhail Gorbachev returned from the Washington summit last week to find his Central Asian lands engulfed in virtual civil war. It began with a property dispute between Kirgiz and Uzbek neighbors in the town of Osh near the Chinese border. But in a now familiar pattern, ethnic conflict escalated into an attack on the symbols of Soviet power. Armed demonstrators besieged Interior Ministry garrisons. Angry students in Frunze, the Kirgiz capital, demanded that the local leadership resign and pelted the Communist Party chief with rocks when he appeared at a rally to appeal for calm. By the weekend, more than 100 people had been killed and over 400 injured. With local police outgunned, an unhappy Soviet military struggled to keep the peace. ...
  • Korea's Heartbreaking Hills

    While Roh Tae Woo was in the United States last week discussing Korea's future, I was in Korea--searching for the past. In 1951, I served in the Korean War as a lieutenant in the U.S. Marine Corps. I had not been back since. Now I was hoping to find answers to questions that had haunted me for years: Would I be able to find the hills where my comrades and I fought? What would my emotions be if I did? Would being in Korea again, even for a brief visit, change my feelings about the war? ...
  • Potholes Ahead On Tobacco Road

    Foreign visitors see the change most clearly--and take it hardest. Covering Mikhail Gorbachev's recent trip to San Francisco, an Italian journalist was so intimidated by the scorn of his neighbors I when he tried to light up that he left the pressroom in the middle of the Soviet chair- | man's speech to have a cigarette in his I hotel room. "This place is like a dictatorship of nonsmokers,' he grumbled to an I American colleague. 'I feel like a prison- | en" Most of the 49 million Americans who still smoke are similarly cowed these days, if a bit more resigned. When Shane Taylor found herself one of only three smokers in a Chicago office of 26. huddling in a hallway I without even a chair to smoke in, she decided to kick the habit. "Smoking just isn't condoned in our society," she said. "I've given up. I don't want to fight anymore." ...
  • A Comedy Comeback

    Mary Tyler Moore couldn't bring it off. Neither could the ever-lovable Lucy. For some elusive reason, making TV comebacks is tougher for funny women than for funny men (witness Bob Newhart and the Cos). Behold, then, Carol Burnett. Her triumphal reincarnation as the star of NBC's sleeper-hit "Carol & Company" isn't merely odds defying. (How many 57-year-old comedians manage to crack Nielsen's top 15 after being away for more than a decade?) It's also happening within TV's riskiest format. The anthology approach--presenting a single story with different characters each week--hasn't reaped ratings for a woman since the last time Loretta Young swirled through that doorway. ...
  • Shaping Up

    Sharon Stone, 32, has the right mental and physical stuff to act in both Woody Allen's brooding "Stardust Memories" (1980) and Arnold Schwarzenegger's sci-fi megahit, "Total Recall." She refused to have a stunt double for her role as Arnold's wife, a karate-chopping undercover agent. Her costar, she says, made fun of her rigorous workout routine. "In another year," he told her, "you'll be a truck driver." Not likely. Stone's distinctly feminine form is on display in the July Playboy. Seeing the 10-page spread "has done wonders for my image of my body," she says. "I used to dress like a Japanese bag lady--60 layers of black clothes. Now I wear as little as possible."
  • A Plan For Europe

    At this meeting with so-called intellectuals in Washington, Gorbachev took me aside to say that a road map for the future was his most important concern. He was right. The upheavals of the past year make the creation of a new structure for European security essential. It must take into account the imminent unification of Germany as well as the de facto collapse of the Warsaw Pact. It has to define America's new relationship with Europe while granting the Soviet Union a serious role in Europe. ...
  • Roh: 'North Korea Will Start To Open Up'

    "The cold-war ice on the Korean Peninsula has now begun to crack, "said South Korean President Roh Tae Woo last week after meeting Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev in San Francisco. In an interview with NEWSWEEK's Tokyo bureau chief Bradley Martin, he elaborated: ...
  • The Boys Are Back In Town

    Another 48 Hrs. is an atrocious movie, the embodiment of all the cynical commercialism that drives the summer season. Paramount skipped the usual reviewers' screenings in favor of one big all-media preview just before the film opened last week. This usually happens when a studio anticipates lousy reviews and wants to get a movie out fast to suck up the bucks the first weekend. Not that bad reviews are going to put one bump under the gravy train of this clear runaway smash. America has been waiting eight years for the sequel to "48 Hrs.," which made Eddie Murphy an instant box-office monster in his screen debut. ...
  • Was It Illness Or Immorality?

    From the time he admitted making a series of obscene phone calls last March to the home of a Virginia police officer and his wife, former American University president Richard Berendzen has been at the center of an intriguing psychiatric debate. Berendzen resigned his presidency and underwent intensive therapy at The Johns Hopkins Hospital, which helped him win a suspended sentence from the court. But some commentators felt he had been let off the moral hook too easily. Not least of the doubters was Susan Allen, the object of most of the bizarre phone calls. Appearing on ABC's "Nightline," she listened stonily as Berendzen and Dr. Paul McHugh, chief psychiatrist at Johns Hopkins Medical School, told how he recalled being sexually abused as a child--a memory "triggered" at the funeral of his father, who died in the very room where the abuse occurred. That, Allen snorted, was no excuse. Berendzen may well have been sick, but he should have controlled himself. "Each time they [obscene...
  • A Season Of Sleaze In Tv News

    Tappy Phillips, ace reporter for New York's local "Eyewitness News," was hot in pursuit of a major homicide case. As the camera zoomed in on a New | York City detective, she grilled him about the stabbing death of a teenage girl found lifeless on a beach. Another preppy murder? A case of "wilding" redux? Not quite. The victim was Laura Palmer, the fictitious corpse of ABC's cult favorite "Twin Peaks." After 90 seconds of air time, the sleuth rendered his verdict: the killer had to be the father of Laura's boyfriend Bobby Briggs. ...
  • 'I Dreamed Our House Caught Fire'

    Like Cezanne with Mont Sainte-Victoire, Richard Ford has for a time explored a single landscape. In some of the stories collected three years ago in "Rock Springs," and now in his novel, Wildlife (177pages. Atlantic Monthly. $18.95), the place, the situation and the characters are very nearly the same. The place is Grand Falls, Mont., in 1960. In each story, the narrator is a 16-year-old boy whose young mother is involved in an affair. In one story the father is dead, but in the rest he's alive: likable, marginally employed, he can be pushed to violence. The interloping lover is, of course, a louse, but usually a louse of some complexity-and the mother's reaction to him, her cleareyed willingness to break with her past, makes these stories eloquent. Ford shows us the moment when human connections come apart. ...