Newsweek

Stories by Newsweek

  • All Eyes on the Rookie

    No issues are more fundamental to the political process than money and territory—how much a candidate may raise and spend and how a candidate's district is drawn. In two high-profile cases this week, the Supreme Court will consider the constitutional rules for these crown jewels of politics. On both, the court has been sharply divided, a fact that makes the arrival of rookie Justice Samuel Alito especially important.The campaign finance case, Randall v. Sorrell , to be argued on Feb. 28, concerns Vermont's strictest-in-the-nation campaign finance laws, which severely limit contributions and spending in state campaigns. The redistricting fight, LULAC v. Perry , to be argued the next day, on March 1, involves the celebrated redistricting of Texas' congressional districts, in which former Majority Leader Tom DeLay played a prominent role.Both cases involve issues at the very heart of legislatures' interest in the political process. And both illustrate that easy clichés about judicial...
  • Living on The Edge

    On Oct. 8, an earthquake of 7.6 magnitude shook one of the more remote regions of the world. Tens of thousands of people were immediately crushed to death by falling debris. Thousands more died later of their injuries. Millions were left homeless, and a harsh Himalayan winter was closing in. For weeks, international donors were slow to respond. But last week, governments and other institutions made large pledges to help Pakistan recover--bringing the total in promised grants and loans to roughly $5.8 billion, according to Pakistani officials. Emergency aid, such as tents, blankets and medical care, is most desperately needed in Pakistani-administered Kashmir, where these photos were taken.
  • Ask the Technologist

    I'm finally ready to buy a Global Positioning System (GPS) for my car. Which features are the most important for me to consider?There are two types of GPS units people use in their cars: automotive and handheld. We prefer automotive units because of their larger screens, but portable units have the advantage of being usable away from your car. As for essential features, look for devices with address-to-address routing and both voice and visual prompts for turns.
  • PERSPECTIVES

    "Everything was in chaos." ...
  • ASK THE TECHNOLOGIST

    I listen to audiobooks frequently while I'm driving. Can Apple's iPod allow me to download audiobooks and play them through my car radio?--Sam Martin, Center Ossipee, N.H.It certainly can. At Apple's iTunes Music Store (apple.com/ itunes), there's a section devoted to 11,000 audiobooks, with free 90-second previews for each. As for listening to those audiobooks in your car, ilounge.com lists a wide range of iPod accessories, including FM-radio adapters that will play the audio via your car stereo.
  • THE DANGERS OF CHRONIC DISTRESS

    Years ago, when the psychologist Johan Denollet was first working with cardiac patients at a university hospital in Antwerp, Belgium, he noticed a paradox. Some heart-attack survivors remained cheerful and optimistic despite extensive cardiac damage. They joined eagerly in rehabilitation programs and adhered to them. Others grew discouraged. They resisted rehab, even after milder heart attacks, and spent most of their energy complaining. Denollet, now a professor of medical psychology at Tilburg University in the Netherlands, suspected there was something fundamentally different about these two groups of patients. So he set out to find a way of measuring it. The tool he developed--a simple, 14-question personality test known as the DS14--is now opening a new frontier in cardiology.The test, which accompanies this article, defines overall distress in terms of two emotional states: "negative affectivity" (worry, irritability, gloom) and "social inhibition" (reticence and a lack of...
  • PERSPECTIVES

    "Why the heck did they for so many years encourage Poles to build capitalism when as it turns out they are communists themselves?" ...
  • BEWARE THE QUIET BEAR

    It seems like only yesterday that the bull market was in full stampede, with the Nasdaq market above the magic 5000 mark and even nonsexy indicators like the Standard & Poor's 500 and the Dow industrials hitting new high after new high. But those days are so over. Last week was the fifth anniversary of the Nasdaq's all-time closing high of 5048.62, set on March 10, 2000. Next week marks the peaks set by the S&P and the Wilshire 5000 five years ago. Yes, it's possible for stocks not to rise over the long run, despite what you may have thought you learned during the generation-long bull market that ended when the bubble burst five years ago. That market, which ran from August 1982 through February 2000, changed the way the general public thought about stocks. The idea grew that stocks were safe long-term investments, that the magic of the market could solve problems ranging from balancing the federal budget to paying for Social Security. But look at how many people's...
  • PERSPECTIVES

    "My client is hardly a chemist." ...
  • PERSPECTIVES

    "Today I hope we can begin the healing." Sen. John Kerry, conceding his defeat"This is a revolutionary battle; it's a cultural war. We will not stop until we get to the U.S. Constitution." Phil Burress, president of Cincinnati-based Citizens for Community Values, on 11 states' approving constitutional amendments to ban same-sex marriage"You're talking to a nervous, out-of-control Dad!" Former president George H. W. Bush, as the votes for his son were being counted"I think you were an admirable, worthy opponent." George Bush to John Kerry, when the Massachusetts senator called to concede the presidential election"[This is] the closest election that we have seen in this country in--about four years." Comedy Central's "The Daily Show" host Jon Stewart, putting the results in a historical perspective
  • NICE PLACE TO VISIT

    Think of the opportunities to make money investing in an enormous, rapidly developing country that spans a continent. It's a place that welcomes foreign investors, and has a capitalistic culture and an eager, hardworking population. It sure sounds like China in the 21st century, doesn't it? But I'm talking about the United States of America in the 19th century. And thereby hangs our tale. And it's a cautionary one.While almost everyone thinks that the Chinese economy is a can't-miss bet, that doesn't make Chinese stocks a can't-miss investment. These stocks are exceptionally tricky for amateur U.S. investors who don't know the country, don't speak the language and don't know how business is done in a former communist country whose financial markets are an Asian version of the old American Wild West.That's why history matters. Before you rush to buy any Chinese stocks--including the five dozen or so listed on the New York Stock Exchange or the NASDAQ market--remember what happened to...
  • Springing Eternal

    He was a joker, a patriot, a master entertainer, an icon. Remembering Bob Hope, 1903-2003.
  • Perspectives

    "States likes these... constitute an axis of evil, arming to threaten the peace of this world." President George W. Bush, in his State of the Union address, on potential threats from Iraq, Iran and North Korea"Little Bush's accusation... is baseless." Salim al-Qubaisi, leader of Iraq's Baath Party, responding"We will no longer fight beyond the Green Line with the aim of dominating, expelling, starving and humiliating an entire people." A statement signed by more than 100 Israeli reservists, refusing to further occupy the West Bank and Gaza Strip. The Green Line is the pre-1967 boundary between Israel and the Palestinian-controlled region."It will be the beginning of the end of democracy if soldiers don't carry out the decisions of the... government." Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon, in response"Everyone has their own reasons to be here. I'm not sure what they are." Teenager Sean Madden, on protesting at the World Economic Forum in New York"I wouldn't be surprised if right now he...
  • Perspectives

    "Making this test... sends out a very powerful signal." Indian defense analyst and Lt. Gen. V. R. Raghvan (retired), on his country's launching of a nuclear-capable ballistic missile on Friday morning"Very, very minor." Carol Thatcher, daughter of former British prime minister Margaret Thatcher, describing her mother's recent stroke to the BBC on Saturday"To be in an eight- by eight-foot cell in beautiful, sunny Guantanamo Bay is not inhumane treatment." U.S. Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld, defending the handling of Qaeda and Taliban detainees in Cuba"He had not eaten for a few days, and this morning I discovered him dead in his cage." Zookeeper Sheragha Omar, on Marjan, the famous one-eyed lion of Kabul Zoo"Minilateralist." Swedish diplomat and former prime minister Carl Bildt, describingGeorge W. Bush's foreign policy. After September 11, the U.S. president had to adapt his instinctive unilateralism to the realities of assembling an international coalition against terrorism....
  • The Basics Still Matter

    Q: I'm looking at the new maximum contributions for IRAs and 401(k)s. Would it be better to add more to my 401(k)? Or should I reduce my contribution and put some money into a Roth IRA instead? Kim Kotalik, Viera, Fla.A: It's all a numbers game--or rather, a numbers guess. First, you'd make sure that you put enough in your 401(k) to qualify for the full company match. After that, a younger person is generally better off with the Roth IRA, says CPA Barry Picker of Brooklyn, N.Y., who specializes in retirement planning. Here's why:A Roth takes after-tax contributions. For every $1,000 you put in, you'll pay $280 in taxes upfront (assuming you're in the 28 percent bracket). But you've moved a full $1,000 into the account. At age 59 1/2, you can withdraw the earnings entirely tax-free, as long as you've held the account for at least five years.By contrast, a 401(k) uses pre-tax dollars. For every $1,000 you contribute you'll owe $280 in taxes at retirement when you take the money out....
  • My 60-Second Protest From The Hallway

    It's 8:32 a.m. school began two minutes ago. My bulging book bag is inside my first-period classroom saving my favorite seat. I am standing in the near-empty hallway, leaning against a locker right outside the classroom. I should be in class, yet my teacher has never objected to my minutelong absence, which has become a daily routine. I trace around the edges of the floor tiles with the toe of my running shoe, pausing several times to glance up at the second hand of the standard-issue clock mounted across the hall.Although I have casually checked this clock countless times during my high-school career, this year looking at it has made me think about how significant 60 seconds can be. Last spring, the Commonwealth of Virginia passed a law that requires every public school in the state to set aside one minute at the beginning of each day during which students must remain seated while they "meditate, pray, or engage in any other silent activity." Every morning, at around 8:31, a...
  • Newsweek Reporter Detained By Palestinians

    It started out as a routine day in Gaza, if there is such a thing. Early Tuesday afternoon, NEWSWEEK Jerusalem Bureau Chief Joshua Hammer traveled to Rafah, a town on the southern tip of the Gaza Strip. ...
  • If You Can't Stand The Heat...

    The cast and crew of Japan's hit TV show "Iron Chef" got a potful of culture shock last week when they filmed an episode in New York. The show, in which two master chefs race against the clock to outcook each other, has gained a cult following in America. Minutes into the show, challenger Bobby Flay of New York's Mesa Grill began slamming lids, knocking bottles to the floor and shoving cameramen out of the way while his fans hollered "You da man, Bobby!" When an overturned pot of water doused ungrounded wires, sending jolts of electricity through his metal tables, Flay screamed, "This is not f--ing OK!" Waiting for the winner to be announced, "Iron Chef's" Masaharu Morimoto muttered, "This just isn't right."
  • Our Latest Magazine: Issues 2000

    This week subscribers around the world will be receiving a special edition of NEWSWEEK International (and if you need extra copies, you'll also be able to buy it on newsstands). Issues 2000 looks at the themes and people who will be in the news next year. The magazine is the product of a unique collaboration between Newsweek and the World Economic Forum. Each year, the WEF identifies 100 Global Leaders for Tomorrow and invites them to the annual meeting in Davos, Switzerland. The GLTs are men and women who have shown real achievement in their chosen fields while demonstrating a high degree of social awareness. This year the GLTs formed a number of study groups on everything from the globalization of medicine to the future of Europe; in Issues 2000, we combined their thoughts with those of distinguished commentators and our own correspondents around the globe.We're delighted with the results. Issues 2000 includes guest essays by United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan, U.S....
  • John Wooden: First, How To Put On Your Socks

    I think it's the little things that really count. The first thing I would show our players at our first meeting was how to take a little extra time putting on their shoes and socks properly. The most important part of your equipment is your shoes and socks. You play on a hard floor. So you must have shoes that fit right. And you must not permit your socks to have wrinkles around the little toe--where you generally get blisters--or around the heels. It took just a few minutes, but I did show my players how I wanted them to do it. Hold up the sock, work it around the little toe area and the heel area so that there are no wrinkles. Smooth it out good. Then hold the sock up while you put the shoe on. And the shoe must be spread apart--not just pulled on the top laces. You tighten it up snugly by each eyelet. Then you tie it. And then you double-tie it so it won't come undone--because I don't want shoes coming untied during practice, or during the game. I don't want that to happen. I'm...
  • ... And Into The Unknown

    Memorial Day weekend symbolizes the start of the American summer. Forget that stuff about honoring the war dead. Now it's become a three-day orgy of parades and barbecues and swimming-pool openings. And to us stockholders, Memorial Day is especially welcome this year, because we'll have only four stock-market days to worry about this week. Think of it as a 20-percent-off-worrying sale. And there's plenty to worry about, not just Internet stocks. For the first time since last fall, when Fed chairman Alan Greenspan inadvertently revived stock prices by cutting interest rates to forestall a worldwide financial panic, it's time for any sensible investor to be nervous. And Internet stock investors should be especially nervous, because Net stock prices depend on faith, not economics. Thus, they're especially vulnerable. ...
  • As Plain As Black And White

    I don't know exactly what Lisa Williamson, the self-named "raptivist" Sister Souljah, said before and after the killing-white-people quote that Governor Clinton condemned, and that TV shows and newspapers and magazines, including this one, have reacted to ever since. I do not know exactly what she meant, although friends have paraphrased for me her explanation on the " Today" show. But I do know that the whole incident strikes an old, resonant chord in American racial relations. You can tell by the language we're using like blunt instruments, language that's trying to do many things at once. As always, black and white America are trying to make each other understand--to explain, score, dominate, manipulate, control, provoke, apologize and dis. ...
  • On The Trail Of An Elusive Killer

    Researchers are only beginning to write the book on gene therapy, but last week they set to work on the first draft of a potentially exciting chapter. After an intensive review, the Food and Drug Administration gave the go-ahead for a radical technique that will, for the first time, battle cancer through human genetic manipulation. By the year-end, scientists at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) intend to work with the first of 50 terminal patients with advanced melanoma, a virulent skin cancer which does not respond to any other form of treatment. Steven A. Rosenberg, head of the research team, emphasizes that the procedure "is experimental and in an early stage of development." But if it succeeds, there is hope that it could be a breakthrough in the protracted war against the deadly disease. ...
  • Ferraro On Ferraro

    On the back deck of a rented cottage overlooking Lake Tahoe, Geraldine Ferraro looked totally at ease as she talked with NEWSWEEK about her selection as Walter Mondale's running mate, her political philosophy and the campaign ahead. Excerpts: ...