Newsweek

Stories by Newsweek

  • High Stakes For Online Gamblers

    By Jeremy HerbBetween online gambling and the countless ESPN reruns of the World Series of Poker, poker has become a mainstream "sport." More than 6,000 people paid $10,000 to enter this year's World Series main event, and gambling experts say 10 to 15 million Americans wager $100 billion on all forms of Internet gaming annually. The online gambling industry—made up of offshore companies—earns somewhere between $6 and $10 billion in the U.S. each year. But it's a poker game of politics, not cards, that will decide the fate of online gambling in the U.S.The battle rests on a bill that was passed in the final hours of the 2006...
  • Footballing Obama Experiences the Wonders of Slow Motion

    If President Obama was looking for another way to differentiate himself from President Bush, he just found it. When it comes to sports, you might recall Bush as an avid mountain biker. He also showed off some lightening-quick reflexes that one time that would give him an edge in dodgeball, and certainly fencing. Obama’s forté so far has been shooting hoops. Now add to the list, football. Check out this PSA that will run during several football games on Thanksgiving Day that encourages kids to get more exercise. Between spliced footage of kids running and doing jumping jacks, Obama makes a cameo on the White House lawn, tossing around the old pigskin. An ordinary game of catch, right? Not quite. The whole spot comes off as rather moving, almost epic, but not because of Obama or his receiving skills. Producers slowed down the footage so much that a short-range pass from New Orleans’s Saints quarterback Drew Brees to Obama ends up looking like a Sports Center highlight. Then, add in s...
  • There Is No Such Thing As Female Viagra: Flibanserin Can't Change Why Some Women Don't Want Sex

    by Barbara KantrowitzBack in the pre-Viagra age, men were actually impotent. Now, guys with a mechanical problem suffer from erectile dysfunction (E.D. in the ubiquitous TV ads), clearly one of Big Pharma’s most successful rebranding efforts. But women have been denied a similar makeover for their sexual problems because no one has yet figured out why some want it all the time and others hardly ever. If you’re too tired, you’re just plain frigid.That could change with the announcement this week that a pill that appears to increase sexual desire in women with low libidos. This potential blockbuster, developed by the German drug manufacturer Boehringer Ingelheim, is called flibanserin and it was almost a nonstarter when it was first tested as an antidepressant. Flibanserin didn’t lift mood, but researchers noticed that it had one intriguing quality: it appeared to heighten sexual interest in laboratory animals and humans.Could it be Big Pharma’s Holy Grail: a female Viagra? No doubt...
  • Research Determines Exactly What All Women Want, All The Time, In Every Scenario...Except Not.

    by Leigh Bond Who says that women only like jerks? A new study published in the journal Science from Binghamton University and the University of Arizona adds yet another clue to the mystery that is female sexual selection.  "Nice guys don't always finish last," says the press release.Of course, the nice guys in question happened to be insects. Researchers in this study observed the effects of a controlled group of male water striders – both aggressive and low-key, and their sexual relations with the females in the group. According to the study led by Omar Tonsi Eldakar of the University of Arizona’s Arizona Research Laboratories, groups of “gentlemen” water striders mated with  more females than did groups of the “psychopath” suitors. The research contradicts previous laboratory studies finding sexually aggressive males more successful at reproducing, said Eldakar. In previous studies, the females were blocked from leaving the areas populated by the sexually...
  • How Long Will the Bull Rally Last?

    With so much cheap money sloshing around, the stock market's been on a roll lately. Given that the economy is still sputtering, how long will the rally last? ...
  • Afghans Optimistic Despite U.S. Public Opinion

    By Jerry Guo Since Barack Obama took office, U.S. public opinion has grown increasingly bleak on Afghanistan's prospects. Yet Afghans are increasingly optimistic. In an Asia Foundation survey taken in June and July, 42 percent said the country is moving in the right direction, up from 38 percent last year, despite rampant corruption and Taliban advances. The margin for error was about 4 percent, so this doesn't represent a big spike, but it's still striking that Afghanistan's morale is not decaying as fast as the world's view of Afghanistan is.  ...
  • From Ft. Hood to Florida: Lots of Questions, Few Answers on the Psyche of Shooters

    by Rabeika Messina We don’t know much about suspected Ft. Hood killer Nidal Malik Hasan: there are reports he gave away his possessions. There are reports he was terrified of being deployed. And there’s the fact that prior to his killing spree, Hasan worked as a psychiatrist, treating war-affected patients at both Walter Reed and Ft.  Hood. Shouldn’t a psychiatrist have seen his own unraveling coming? Or are psychiatrists more likely to unravel than anyone else? What turns a man professionally endowed to treat the mental ailments of others into one who goes mental himself?  And in his addled state, what did he think he’d achieve by opening fire into a crowd? We may never fully know what Hasan was thinking the morning before his alleged killing spree, but we do know that some of his professional colleagues frustrated that this attack may be perceived as yet another black mark against their industry. Psychiatrists have long been plagued by jokes about instability, and while most are...
  • Making Sense of Maine

    By Jesse Ellison Yesterday, Mainers turned out in unexpectedly high ...
  • Spin Watch: Which Party Is Framing Election Results Better?

    There’s nothing more characteristically Washington than a heaping helping of spin the morning after an election. It makes sense: both parties have face to save or unearned points to claim. It turns out that the weeks both parties spent trying to attach national significance to several regional elections has made for some pretty good spin.Now, before we go to the tape, keep in mind several constants here. For one, both parties are looking at the same election results. That is, victories for the GOP in Virginia and New Jersey and a Dem win in a single, yet spotlighted, congressional district in upstate New York. And secondly, for the sake of consistency, we pulled the statements of both de facto party leaders, DNC head Tim Kaine and RNC Chairman Michael Steele—both of whom hold the same position in their parities and, we can reasonably speculate, would probably swap statements if the results were reversed.That said, let’s start with the GOP’s Steele, who seems to go all-in on the...
  • Iran Reverses Itself on Oct. 1 Geneva Concessions

    Newsweek’s Michael Hirsh reports in this week’s magazine that Iran is backtracking from the nuclear concessions it recently agreed to. Says Hirsh, “With a year-end deadline approaching to show progress on nuclear talks, the U.S. and its European allies are likelier to call for more sanctions. Tehran's reversal began, NEWSWEEK has learned, at an Oct. 28 discussion between Iran's chief nuclear negotiator, Saeed Jalili, and Javier Solana, the top Western negotiator.” Read the whole piece here.
  • One Last Thought on Zahara's Hair: Patrice Grell Yursik Weighs In

    By Patrice Grell Yursik Can I be honest? If the opportunity presented itself to meet Allison Samuels in person, I might respectfully decline. At the very least I'd be a little nervous. Not because I'd be intimidated by such an esteemed journalist (whose work I have admired in the past) but because apparently she'd look at me and deem my hair to be "a hot mess." And according to her most recent rebuttal, other people are apparently looking at me and thinking the same thing "...because like or not, how we look has a huge impact on how people see us and ultimately judge us. Is it fair? No. But is it reality? Yes, it very much is."Wow. That's enough to give anyone self-esteem issues.Just about every day of the week, my hair looks quite similar to Zahara Jolie-Pitt's. Yes, it's true, I live in a wash-and-go world. It exists. And it's wonderful here. I look at pictures of Zahara Jolie-Pitt and see an adorable, sassy little girl who&...
  • My Pit-Bull Conversion: Joan Raymond on Her Decision to (Probably) Adopt a Pit Bull

    It’s hard out there for a pit. Talking pit bulls is as polarizing as talking about health-care reform. Each side—the pro- and anti-pit-bull devotees—has a lot to say. And like health-care reform, some stuff being spewed by both the devotees and the haters is just plain wrong. Some advocates think these dogs are imbued with incredible judgment, rendering them incapable of doing anything wrong. And their people-loving nature makes them the right dog for just about everyone. They also believe the media are responsible for the pits’ poor image.  First, any dog is capable of doing a bad thing—even your precious pit bull. Second, no one dog is right for every person. And third, bad owners are responsible for the pits’ problems. The media have bigger problems right now—like whether we can keep our jobs. Some anti-pit people think the world would be a safer place if every pit on the planet ceased to exist. They buy into bite statistics and bite fatalities, which are notoriously unreliable....
  • Newsverse: The Informed Voter’s Guide to the Afghan Runoff Election

    By Jerry Adler Many Afghan men are knownBy a single name aloneWhich can make the Kabul phone            Book very hard to use. Sometimes if they like their ownName enough, they’ll add a cloneSo Abdullah’s name has grown            By doubling, to confuse— Americans.  The other catIs Hamid Karzai, with the hat.A Karakul – I googled that.            It’s also worn by Jews—  From Africa.  You fold it flat.            Gee, it’s hard to choose.
  • Roslyn Hardy Holcomb: Hair Don'ts Hold Us Back

    The issue of African-American hair is difficult and complex. Throughout our years in this country it has been used to scorn and belittle us. Given the long duration of this oppression it’s not surprising that many of us have absorbed this disdain for our hair texture and seek to impose this tyranny on others. bell hooks, author of Happy to Be Nappy and dozens of other books, talks about traditions and behaviors in the African-American community that are holdovers from slavery and Jim Crow. Many of these cultural adaptations, while necessary then, are damaging and downright dangerous now. Most assuredly this notion that little girls should have their hair subdued into an “acceptable” standard is one of them. Many of these hairstyles can take hours; hours that are utter torture to most children. What could be more damaging to a little girl’s self-esteem than the notion that her hair is so “bad” it must be “styled” into traction alopecia? For too long little black girls have been told...
  • Nichelle Gainer: It's Time to Fully Embrace Natural Hair

    I don't frequent the black-gossip blogs and forums Allison Samuels linked to in her first article (especially the ones that feel comfortable giving Maya Angelou "Ho Sit Down" awards), so I have not seen recent pictures of Zahara Jolie-Pitt's hair. The lone exception is the photo that accompanies Samuels's criticism, which even she acknowledges did nothing to help her argument. As Samuels has noted, Zahara's dad, Brad Pitt, made headlines in 2006 when he told Esquire that he and Angelina Jolie used Carol's Daughter products on Zahara's hair. He even mentioned the "beautiful luster" the products gave her hair and how "nice it smelled." Clearly the Jolie-Pitts are aware that their adopted Ethiopian daughter has hair that is different in texture from their own and needs to be taken care of, so why devote an entire article on this particular child now?Samuels asks in her rebuttal, "Hey, if Maddox can get blond highlights a...
  • Predator Drone Deaths In Pakistan: By The Numbers

    82 Number of U.S. drone strikes in Pakistan since 2006. 20 Number of Al Qaeda, Taliban, and other militant leaders who have been killed in the attacks. 31 Percentage of attack casualties who were Pakistani civilians. 68 Percentage of attack casualties who were Al Qaeda, Taliban, or other jihadist militants.