Niall Ferguson

Stories by Niall Ferguson

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    Murder on the EU Express

    With the monetary union coming apart, the finger-pointing has begun. Who really killed Europe?
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    The Big Dither

    Obama was right to back a no-fly zone over Libya. But he should have done it weeks ago.
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    How to Get Smart Again

    The way we teach our children history has undermined our chances for success. A leading Harvard historian and NEWSWEEK columnist offers three ways to make it fun.
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    How to Get Gaddafi

    Memo to the president: organic revolutions, just like your Whole Foods arugula, need sunlight and watering. It’s time for a new Helsinki, aimed at discrediting all of today’s unfree states.
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    Ferguson: The Rise of Asia's Bachelor Generation

    In 1927, Ernest Hemingway published a collection of short stories titled "Men Without Women." Today, less than a century later, it sums up the predicament of a rising proportion of mankind. According to the United Nations, there are far more men than women on the planet.
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    Ferguson: Selling Off Assets a Good Option for U.S.

    In my favorite spaghetti Western, "The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly," there is a memorable scene that sums up the world economy today. Blondie (Clint Eastwood) and Tuco (Eli Wallach) have finally found the cemetery where they know the gold is buried.
  • The U.S.-China Economic Partnership Is Through

    When does a rising power become a threat? There is seldom a single moment. A century ago, AngloGerman antagonism was still a relatively new phenomenon; an alliance between the two empires seemed plausible as late as 1899. Likewise, the United States took time to identify Japan as a serious rival in the Pacific region; it was not until the 1930s that relations really soured. In both cases, the perception of a strategic threat was slow to grow. But grow it did—and ultimately it led to war. Could the same be happening to the United States and China today? Are we imperceptibly but inexorably slipping from cooperation to competition?Back in early 2007, it seemed as if China and America were so intertwined they'd become one economy: I called it "Chimerica." The Chinese did the saving, the Americans the spending. The Chinese did the exporting, the Americans the importing. The Chinese did the lending, the Americans the borrowing.As the Chinese strategy was based on export-led growth, they...