Nicki Gostin

Stories by Nicki Gostin

  • Q&A: Real Housewives' Teresa Giudice

    On the eve of the 'Real Housewives from New Jersey' reunion, Teresa stays true to her roots. And we're not talking about hair color.
  • Chuck Barris: Confessions of a Dangerous Novelist

    Barris created The Dating Game, The Newlywed Game and The Gong Show. But since his retirement he's become a writer best known for Confessions of a Dangerous Mind. His novel Who Killed Art Deco just came out in -paperback. He spoke with Nicki Gostin.
  • Matthew McConaughey's Many Girlfriends

    Matthew McConaughey has wooed Kate Hudson, Penélope Cruz (in real life, too) and Jennifer Lopez in movies. In "Ghosts of Girlfriends Past," he's after Jennifer Garner. He spoke with Nicki Gostin: ...
  • Talking to Placido Domingo

    On March 15, Plácido Domingo celebrates his 40th anniversary at the Metropolitan Opera House in New York. He spoke with Nicki Gostin. ...
  • Fast Chat: Fashion Icon Valentino

    Legendary designer Valentino is the subject of a new documentary, "Valentino: The Last Emperor." He spoke with Nicki Gostin about the fashionable life. Excerpts: ...
  • New HBO Sitcom Stars Australian Comic Chris Lilley

    Ja'mie King is a spoiled teen princess who calls her friends "skanks" and makes sure to tell poor people, as bluntly as she can, how much she pities them. Jonah Takalua, a monosyllabic Pacific Islander, is a delinquent who bullies his schoolmates, torments his teachers and draws sophomoric graffiti (penises, usually—he's not very good) on every open surface. Mr. G is an egomaniacal drama teacher who has seized control of the school's latest production, which he rechristened "Mr. G—The Musical." Together, they are the stars of the new HBO sitcom "Summer Heights High," a faux documentary in the cringe-comedy tradition of "The Office" set in an Australian high school. If Ja'mie (that's "Jeh-may"), Jonah and Mr. G look eerily similar, it's because they're played by the same actor: Aussie superstar Chris Lilley, a protean comic who is swiftly emerging as his country's Peter Sellers.Back home, Lilley, 33, is a bit of a cipher. Despite his ballooning fame, he's media shy and soft-spoken. ...
  • Saving Private Ryan

    Ryan Phillippe stars in "Stop Loss," a movie about soldiers forced to serve an extra tour of duty in Iraq. He spoke with Nicki Gostin: ...
  • That Ms. Turner Can Still Turn Heads

    Kathleen Turner has written a memoir, "Send Yourself Roses," in which she dishes about her costars. She spoke with Nicki Gostin. ...
  • Nicole Kidman: The Lady in Waiting

    Nicole Kidman packs a one-two punch this fall with the indie "Margot at the Wedding" and the big-budget fantasy "The Golden Compass." The actress spoke with Nicki Gostin. Excerpts:"Margot's Wedding" is about a dysfunctional relationship between two sisters. You have a sister. Could you relate?In our early teens we were a little combative but subsequently we've become joined at the hip. I'd kill for her. In "The Golden Compass" you play a baddie. Was that fun?Yeah, I prefer the word "villain"—a little classier, right? Did you practice being mean in the mirror?No, no. When you play mean you don't focus on being mean. You focus, I suppose, on the motives behind it. It seems recently you've opened up about your personal life.Not really. In the last year there have been some things in my personal life that have been privy to the whole world and I haven't denied them. So you're like the queen of Australia.No, Cate Blanchett is. I'll be the lady in waiting.
  • The Pride Of Frankenstein

    The last show Mel Brooks produced in his lab was a monster smash. Now comes a show about a monster.
  • Mariska Hargitay, Off the Cuff

    Mariska Hargitay is back for her ninth season as Detective Olivia Benson, one of the toughest women on primetime, in "Law and Order: SVU." She spoke with Nicki Gostin. ...
  • William Baldwin on His New Show

    William Baldwin, a.k.a. the cutest Baldwin, stars in ABC's "Dirty Sexy Money." He talked to Nicki Gostin. ...
  • Will Oscar Finally Toast Peter O'toole?

    It's a bit of a shock when Peter O'Toole enters a room. He's unsteady on his feet--he's 74--and his piercing blue eyes are rheumy with age. You get the feeling that a strong wind might knock him down. But his shirt collar is at a jaunty angle, he's sporting a lovely ascot and when he opens his mouth to talk, you melt. The voice is still strong and sonorous. The edifice may be crumbling a bit but it's still standing. O'Toole is back in an all-too-familiar role: best-actor nominee. In "Venus," he breaks your heart as a once handsome thespian who develops a complicated relationship with a young woman. It's O'Toole's eighth Oscar nomination--he hasn't won one yet--and if he doesn't win, well, let's hope he never gives up trying. He spoke to NEWSWEEK's Nicki Gostin. Excerpts: ...
  • Q&A With Steve Carell

    Steve Carell talks about 'The Office,' about keeping the elephants happy and about how to use irony in a sentence.
  • Q&A With 'La Vie En Rose' Star

    In ‘La Vie En Rose’ Marion Cotillard portrays legendary French chanteuse Edith Piaf in a performance that has been called extraordinary. Piaf ("the Little Sparrow") had a tumultuous life. Born in 1915 in the Belleville section of Paris to a 17-year-old Italian mother and a contortionist father, she was left as a young girl in the care of her fraternal grandmother who ran a brothel.When she was a young child, a severe case of conjunctivitis left her nearly blind. She recovered her sight after her grandmother’s prostitutes pooled their money to send her on a pilgrimage honoring Saint Theresa.Her life included being accused as an accessory to murder (she was acquitted), friendships with Charlie Chaplin and Marlene Dietrich, helping the French Resistance, having the love of her life (boxer Marcel Cerdan) die in a plane accident, a serious addiction to methadone and, oh yes, recording some of the most unforgettable songs of the last century. When she died in 1963, the streets of Paris...
  • Newsmakers Q&A: Nicolas Cage

    In "Ghost Rider," Nicolas Cage plays a motorcycle stuntman who gives his soul to the Devil. But first, he lent his ears to Nicki Gostin.I grew up reading them. It's one of the ways I learned how to read.No. But I kept all the "Ghost Rider" comics.It's the truth. I'm going to be completely truthful with you.The name stood for something I thought was good. It was a unique name. My wife wanted a unique name.Define the word, please.How was I kooky with Patricia?OK. I would say I'm more of a romantic. I wouldn't describe myself as kooky. I'd like you to use the word "romantic"--please!I had teeth removed that coincided with the movie I was making. I don't want you to think I'm completely--I mean, these are stories that get built up over time.You can use that word, yes. If you can find a way to spell it.She's the director, that's her business.No. And if you look at her movies, I don't think there would be any role I'm right for.Actually, that would be fascinating. It would be a stretch,...
  • Newsmakers

    Q&A: MIA FARROWThe eternally ethereal Mia Farrow plays the grandmother in "Arthur and the Invisibles." She spoke with Nicki Gostin.It sure was--the food alone. Let me count the ways: the Camembert, the baguettes, fresh fish, unbelievable wine at lunch, not that I partook. And I love [director] Luc Besson. I'm endlessly fascinated by who he is and the way he expresses himself. I could watch him brush his teeth.No. What a good idea. He's an extremely ethical person and has a profound respect for human beings. We see this reflected in the movie. These two tribes need each other and feel responsible for each other--and this brings me to an issue of the utmost importance: the genocide in Darfur.I think kids have an acute sense of what's right and what's wrong and a sense of outrage.I don't have Brad Pitt, though. Give me Brad Pitt and we can talk.No! What are you talking about?No, it's not like that.I don't know. If I'm lucky enough.14.That's not in my plans, though none of my life...
  • Newsmakers: Clive Owen, Keith Urban, Nicole Kidman, Rosie O'Donnell, Donald Trump, P. Diddy, Arnold Schwarzenegger

    Owen stars in "children of Men," a futuristic thriller about saving the only pregnant woman in a society thought to be entirely sterile. He chatted with Nicki Gostin.I think it's full of humanity. [Director Alfonso] Cuaron has made a film set in the future that's really an excuse to talk about things going on right now.None.I was never offered that part. I promise.[ Laughs ] I always do that.She walked into the read-through and I knew straightaway.It was a little bit Woody Allen-like. She had little Lennon glasses on and all these secondhand books dropping all over the place.Couple of meetings and going to get Ugg boots for my girls.I'm sure you can, but I know they're here.I know. The exchange rate--my God.Why?But I get paid in dollars and live in London. I don't get paid in pounds.[ Laughs ] It's true. I'm not complaining.You have to feel sorry for them, really. They'll never have the Frank Capra holiday you had, with eggnog and cookies, shining lights and beaming faces, humble...
  • Newsmakers: George Clooney, Jennifer Aniston

    He's the sexiest man alive (according to People magazine) for the second time, and he also stars in Steven Soderbergh's noir "The Good German." Clooney spoke with Nicki Gostin.Directing is the key to filmmaking. Everything else is just paint.No, I'm very modern. I have someone that I yell at and they yell it out loud.This year it was Tom and Katie getting married at my house. He sent me a bottle of wine to thank me. With Brad and Angie, I say they're not getting married and the press goes, "Arrgh!" The more you deny, the guiltier you sound.Until O'Reilly sticks his neck out and goes where people are shooting, then I'm not going to worry. If you're going to be famous and have cameras follow you around, you might as well go where the cameras will do some good.[ Laughs ] Um, ah, no, because I also wake up and my knees hurt and I think, "I'm 45."I wash my face with a bar of soap. And I cut my own hair.With a pair of scissors.Something sticks out and you snip it. Though once in a while a...
  • Unriddling a Princess

    Esteemed British biographer Sarah Bradford has written books about Queen Elizabeth II and Jackie Onassis. Her latest, “Diana,” is a biography of the late princess. She spoke with Nicki Gostin. Excerpts:NEWSWEEK: Why did you write this one?Sarah Bradford: I was asked to do it years ago, in 1996, and I thought, well this would be interesting. I’d done a book on George VI, the queen’s father, and then a book on the queen herself, and I thought that Diana’s life was an important episode in the history of the royal family.I did it over the years, went backwards and forwards; it was quite a difficult book to do in the climate of England, so I would just try and interview some people and then retreat and then go back. I was very lucky to have interviews done while I was working on my book of the queen. Some of these people told me a lot of things that they certainly wouldn’t have told me now.Like what?Well, I can’t reveal [specifics] but [things like] what the queen’s attitude was towards...
  • Books: Graphic Stories--With Heart

    Things were going so well for Marisa Acocella. Her cartoons were being published in The New Yorker, and at the age of 43 she had finally become engaged for the first time, to restaurateur Silvano Marchetto. And then five months later her world turned upside down with a diagnosis of breast cancer. So Acocella did what she does best--she wrote (and drew) an utterly charming graphic novel about her bout with cancer."Cancer Vixen" is hilarious, especially its portrayal of her overbearing Italian mother, whom Marisa calls the Sophia Loren of New Jersey. But at the heart of the book is Acocella's relationship with her husband, Silvano, who owns Da Silvano, a trendy downtown-Manhattan restaurant. Silvano is a pudgy version of Giorgio Armani with an impenetrable Italian accent. "I always thought in a relationship a woman had to be perfect all the time ... and breast cancer is definitely a major imperfection," Acocella says. They were married less than a month after her diagnosis. She was...
  • And It's Nora by a Neck

    Childbirth," Nora Ephron says, "is no fun, but at the end you get a big present. This is not true of old age." Ephron is only 65, and looks a good 10 years younger--no, honestly--but she's already beginning to see the signs. When she's shopping for clothes, for instance. "There are stores that you know you simply cannot go into, or if you do go into them the only thing you can buy is black pants." Or when she's writing. "I'll pull something up on my computer that I wrote three years ago, and the type is so small because I used to be able to read 10-point type. Now it's 14. Sometimes 16." And then there's the matter of her neck. Ephron not only has a dozen screenplays to her credit--"You've Got Mail," "Sleepless in Seattle," "When Harry Met Sally"--but also a novel ("Heartburn"), a play ("Imaginary Friends") and the best-selling essay collections "Crazy Salad" and "Wallflower at the Orgy." Her brand-new book of essays, "I Feel Bad About My Neck: And Other Thoughts on Being a Woman"-...
  • Shock Opera

    Jim Dale's doberman, Georgie, enthusiastically greets every visitor to her master's cozy dressing room, begging all who enter to partake in a game of fetch. She accompanies Dale every Wednesday and Saturday and, to his delight, has become the mascot of his new show, a bracing revival of the Kurt Weill and Bertolt Brecht classic "The Threepenny Opera" at New York's Studio 54. The disco that epitomized the height of '70s decadence and bacchanalia is an apt setting for the controversial libretto about criminals and class that has scandalized audiences since 1928. This new production, with costumes by Isaac Mizrahi, will no doubt go on provoking audiences: Wallace Shawn, who wrote the adaptation, has included much of the bawdy language that was originally censored. "I think we're shocking certain people in the way the original shocked certain people," says Dale in his soft English lilt. "The original story is still there, about those that have and those who have not."For Dale, the 70...
  • Fabulous: It's 'Grey Gardens,' Again

    The documentary "Grey Gardens" has long been adored by fashionistas and gay men, but now the cult classic is going mainstream with an off-Broadway musical and an upcoming book and movie. The 1975 film examined the bizarre lives of Edith Bouvier Beale and her daughter, Little Edie, a former debutante. (Yes, those Bouviers--an aunt and first cousin of Jackie O.) The eccentric pair lived in a decrepit 28-room East Hampton, N.Y., mansion with no running water but swarms of cats and raccoons. Why the love? "Little Edie's so inspirational to a lot of disenfranchised people," says Scott Frankel, composer of the musical. "She somehow managed to put on some incredible headgear and still think the best years were ahead. She faced each day with optimism, energy and style." The show stars theater vets Mary Louise Wilson and Christine Ebersole and begins with Little Edie's brief engagement to Joseph Kennedy Jr., which was mysteriously broken. Those who can't make it to New York can content...
  • Newsmakers

    Angela Lansbury's latest role is the awful great-aunt Adelaide in the delightful new kid flick "Nanny McPhee." She talked with NEWSWEEK's Nicki Gostin. ...
  • Judi Dench

    The divine Dame Judi turns in another Oscar-buzzing performance in "Mrs. Henderson Presents." She spoke with NEWSWEEK's Nicki Gostin.Well, in that you know if that is what's happening to the character you're playing, then I understood. But I don't want to make her like me.I worked. A lot of people accused me of running away from something, but for me it wasn't like that.I work entirely on instinct, nothing else. I'm a kind of animal. I'm not intellectual in any way. I never read plays; I just do them because someone asked me to. Tony Hopkins and I didn't know how "Antony and Cleopatra" ended during our first read-through.Not naughty. Dangerous. I've gotten myself into real trouble by saying yes to a play, then going to the first reading and realizing, "This is a bummer!"The reason why I never made films earlier was because my face wasn't right for film and I was told that. I was hurt, but now that I've become older, it's become more acceptable.I've been nude in two things.Well, not...

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