Noelle Chun

Stories by Noelle Chun

  • China’s New-Look Orphanages

    China's orphanages used to be seen as dumping grounds for unwanted children. No longer. An on-scene report from a volunteer caregiver.
  • Watch Out, Hillary! If You Think I’m All About the Politics of Hope, Wait ’Til You Meet My Half-Sister!

    About a decade younger than Obama, she has those familiar wide-set eyes, the generous grin, the measured speaking cadence. They share a mother, Ann Dunham. They share, too, the absence of a father. Her father, an Indonesian business executive, and her mother divorced not long after Soetoro-Ng was born. Obama also grew up without knowing his father, Barack Obama Sr., who returned to his native Kenya. Even by the multicultural standards of Hawaii, the half-siblings grew up knowing their home was scarcely the social norm, with strands connecting Kansas, Kenya and Jakarta. Soetoro-Ng says that Barack helped her sift through those complexities. “He really took over a great many of the responsibilities of raising me,” she says—crediting her brother with introducing her to the works of Toni Morrison and James Baldwin (in his book “Dreams of My Father” Barack recalls scolding Soetoro-Ng for watching TV and neglecting the stack of books he’d given her)—and taking her through the streets of ...
  • How to Have a Healthy BBQ

    A weekly look at the nutritional value, or lack thereof, of some of our favorite foods.
  • Up Close & Edible: Tuna

    A weekly look at the nutritional value, or lack thereof, of some of our favorite foods.
  • Up Close & Edible: Ginger

    A weekly look at the nutritional value, or lack thereof, of some of our favorite foods.
  • Up Close & Edible: Apple Cider Vinegar

    Word on the yoga mats is that a few daily tablespoons of apple cider vinegar could be the miracle potion for melting away fat, buoying the immune system, restoring arthritic joints and even curing gout—among a host of other ailments. Much of the hype comes from old folk tales and suave marketers. Dieticians and scientists have a different story: vinegar's most magical, confirmed benefit may just be as a tasty, low-cal condiment.Myths about apple cider vinegar date back to the 17th century. In 1820, poet Lord Byron—who reputedly suffered from anorexia nervosa and bulimia—made popular the vinegar and water diet, a regimen the American Dietetic Association (ADA) today includes on its list of fad diets. In the late 1950s, D.C. Jarvis's popular book "Folk Medicine" praised apple cider vinegar as the solution for a range of ailments—from chronic fatigue, to arthritis, to fat pulverizing. And Patricia Bragg of Bragg Live Foods Inc., a California-based company that is one of the leading...