Davos Special Report: We're No 'Monster'

Alexander Medvedev is deputy chairman of Gazprom, the huge company at the heart of Russia's emerging energy empire. Last week he announced that profits rose 43 percent in 2006 to $37.2 billion, even as European leaders were voicing open concern about Russia's use of oil and gas shipments to pressure small neighbors like Belarus and Ukraine. Medvedev is among the Gazprom execs preparing to travel to Davos, where "power shifts" to new players like Russia lead the agenda. They'll try to present Russia as a reliable partner and head off European moves to diversify. Medvedev spoke to NEWSWEEK's Owen Matthews in Moscow: ...

No More Mr. Nice Guy

From the way Aleksandr Lukashenka was talking, you'd think war had just broken out. "We will not surrender our country to anyone who wants to tear it to pieces!" railed Belarus's president after Russia stopped oil exports to Belarus--and European customers farther down the line--in a row over tariffs and energy prices. "We may have to go down into the bunkers, but we will not surrender!"Actually, he waved the white flag just a couple of days later. What choice did he have? No one knows exactly what was said in a tense phone conversation between Vladimir Putin and Lukashenka, but it was clear that Putin was playing for keeps. The Kremlin's key threat: to slap tariffs on Belarussian goods exported to Russia. Since well above half of Belarus's trade is with its larger neighbor--and onetime best geopolitical friend--that would have destroyed the country's economy.The terms of surrender were no less brutal. They included a twofold increase in the price of gas, the sell-off of Belarus's...

Russian Roulette

Alexander Litvinenko said a lot of outrageous things when he was alive. He claimed that Al Qaeda's No. 2, Ayman al-Zawahiri, was a Russian agent. He alleged that he had a tape of Russian President Vladimir Putin having sex with another man. And he declared, just before dying, that his enemies in the FSB, Russia's secret service, had poisoned him in order to silence him. Some of Litvinenko's allegations were hard to believe. But as British and FBI investigators followed a radioactive trail left by the deadly isotope, polonium 210, that killed the Russian exile on Nov. 23--finding traces of it on planes from Moscow to London--they began to believe he might have been on to something. Litvinenko, hairless and ghostly pale, had devoted his last minutes of consciousness to fingering the FSB and Putin himself. "You have shown yourself to be as barbaric and ruthless as your most hostile critics have claimed," the former FSB lieutenant colonel turned dissident said on his deathbed. "The howl...

Who Lost Turkey?

Benedict XVI stood, shoeless, side by side with the Mufti of Istanbul beneath the cavernous great dome of onetime Constantinople's famed Blue Mosque, palms upraised in the traditional Muslim gesture of peace and supplication. What precisely the pope prayed for is a matter between himself and his maker--but surely it involved healing between Christians and Muslims, an issue that has come to define his pontificate and his era.When prayer becomes a geopolitical strategy, there's a problem. The most immediate: an imminent breakdown of relations between Turkey and the European Union. Not so long ago, it seemed that Europe would overcome prejudice and define itself as an ideology rather than a geography, a way of being in the world rather than a mere agglomeration of nation-states. But that chance is now lost. "Turkey will never be a full member of the EU," predicts British M.E.P. Daniel Hannan. "There's a dawning realization of that reality on all sides."This is a tragedy--a catastrophe,...

Get Yer Cheap Nukes Now

Are discount nuclear plants a good idea? Russia thinks so. The Kremlin has set about recasting Russia's once top-secret nuclear industry as the world's leading mass marketer of cheap, reliable reactors. As energy prices soar, nuclear power has been gaining in popularity, and Russia is the market leader in cut-price reactors. Current models of its VVER1000 cold-water reactors cost just $750 per kilowatt of capacity, compared with $1,900 to $2,300 for a French reactor. Russia also offers small reactors of 300 to 400 megawatts for countries with small budgets. "Our power stations are not a bit worse than anyone else's," says Sergei Shmatko, the president of Atomstroyexport, Russia's atomic-power-station construction company. "My dream," he adds, "is to make the export and construction of our nuclear stations as simple and as fast as putting IKEA furniture together."Russian President Vladimir Putin signaled his seriousness about marketing Russian nukes in the spring of 2006 when he...

Mission Impossible?

It was a very Turkish standoff. The venue was the large cobbled square in front of Istanbul’s ancient Haghia Sophia, a favored local venue for protests for centuries. The antagonists were two groups of women, both young, both in a uniform of sorts, but reflecting two very different sets of social ideals. On one side, 150 middle-class women, all wearing colorful Islamic headscarves and long Islamic coats, held printed banners protesting the Pope’s visit. On the other, lined up in a row, was a selection of Istanbul’s finest: female police in dark blue combat pants and plastic body armor, wielding batons. The message from the authorities to the protesters was simple enough: you send your Islamic womento stage a demonstration. We have our secular women—in riot gear—to stop you.“We’re here because the Pope has insulted our prophet and our religion,” said one young Muslim activist, a woman who gave only her first name, Emine. “He is not welcome here unless he apologizes for the insult.”...

Space: Moon Mining

Could a wonder fuel found on the surface of the moon be the answer to the Earth's dwindling energy resources? Known as helium 3, it's an isotope created by solar radiation and caught in crystals deposited on the moon (but not on Earth). It could be the key fuel for producing energy through nuclear fusion, which in theory could produce copious amounts without harmful radiation. Russia's Space Corp. has developed an elaborate plan to mine helium 3 on the moon. Robots would dig up the 3-meter-deep layer of lunar dust, which contains helium 3, and heat the dirt to 300 degrees Celsius to release the gas. Since a ton of lunar soil contains just 36 grams of helium, 20 square kilometers would yield just 10 tons of helium 3. To provide energy for such an operation, Russia would build nuclear reactors the size of a tabletop. Total cost: between $40 billion and $200 billion. Any investors out there?

Periscope

Could Russia and Georgia soon be at war? After Georgian authorities arrested four Rus-sian military officers last week and charged them with spying and terrorism, both sides have been doing a very good imitation of preparing for full-scale conflict. Georgian Interior Minister Vano Merabishvili claimed that the Russian Army was mobilizing in North Ossetia, and was preparing troops for action at a Russian base in Akhalkalaki, inside Georgia. Calls for "decisive action" came from Moscow parliamentarians as hundreds of nationals were evacuated from Tbilisi.How did relations get so bad? The two neighbors have been at loggerheads ever since the pro-U.S. Mikhail Saakashvili took power in Tbilisi in 2003. The Georgian president has moved his country rapidly toward NATO membership, and in apparent retaliation, Russia banned Georgian imports. And in recent months, Russian-backed separatists inside Georgia have stepped up operations, further heightening tensions.Still, for all of last week's...

A Quick Guide to Orhan Pamuk

Once again, Turkish novelist Orhan Pamuk is rumored to be a leading candidate for the Nobel Prize in Literature. The author of “Snow” and “My Name Is Red” has been here before, along with Philip Roth and Joyce Carol Oates, the writers most frequently mentioned as his competition. But this looks like the 54-year-old Pamuk’s year (a bad year for a writer can be good for his Nobel chances—see below).In the interest of dispelling any Orhan Who? confusion, we’re providing a crib sheet. So by the time the Nobel committee makes its announcement Oct. 12, you’ll be up to speed. Of course, the more we say and the more you prepare, the worse his chances will probably get. On the other hand, he’s someone you should know about whether he ever wins the prize or not. He’s that good.Who is Orhan Pamuk?Pamuk is Turkey's greatest novelist—and its most controversial. Last year he sparked a furor when he told a Swiss newspaper that "a million Armenians and 30,000 Kurds were killed in this country ...

Second Thoughts

Once, Europe was a sweetshop, and Turkey was an eager kid with his face pressed to the window. Just two years ago, polls showed that more than 70 percent of Turks wanted to join the European Union, convinced that following the road to Brussels would make them richer, healthier and freer. Now, only months after long-delayed negotiations finally began, support for the EU has slipped to just 43 percent, and is falling fast.What caused Turkey's 40-year court-ship of Europe to go so sour so quickly? The most obvious frictions are over Cyprus: Turks feel they are being bullied by Brussels into making further concessions over the divided island. Wounded national pride has punctured the EU dream for many Turks. But a more fundamental point of contention has arisen in nuts-and-bolts economic issues. Slowly and quietly, Turkish leaders of small and medium-size businesses, who are responsible for 55 percent of Turkey's GDP and 70 percent of jobs, are losing enthusiasm for joining the EU.Why?...

Cash and Carry

Russians just love Montenegro. The tiny republic, which became the world's newest nation after voting recently for independence from neighboring Serbia, is an island of Slavic culture on one of the most beautiful stretches of the Adriatic. The religion is Orthodox. The local Serbian dialect is readily understandable by Russian speakers. And it's one of the last Mediterranean destinations not requiring visas for Russians.No wonder they're descending on the place in droves. What more could the place possibly offer? Well, for one thing--extremely liberal laws on cash. Unlike most other places in Europe, Montenegro has no problem with folks who come bearing suitcases full of money, especially if they pour such lucre into the local economy. And that, of course, is exactly what Russians are doing in ever-growing numbers. According to British real-estate consultant Ian Giddings, property prices in popular seaside resorts like Kotor and the nearby Lustica peninsula have doubled in the past...

The Next Front

Israel launched airstrikes on Lebanon in response to attacks by Hizbullah earlier this month, and George W. Bush called it "self-defense." But what to tell the Turks, who over the last week lost 15 sol-diers to terror attacks launched by sepa-ratist Kurds from neighboring Iraq? Many Turkish leaders are pressing for cross-border tactical air assaults on the guerrillas. But Bush, fearing yet another escalation of the Middle East's violence, urged Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan to hold off. "The message was, unilateral action isn't going to be helpful," says a senior U.S. official, describing the 15-minute phone conversation. "The president asked for patience."And so Turkish forces are holding fast--for now--in deference to their half-century alliance with the United States. But that patience is bound to be challenged, probably sooner than later. Domestic political pressures are building to take a leaf from Israel's book and hit back at the guerrillas of the Kurdistan Work-ers'...

The Politics of Pipelines

Half a century ago, Hungarians learned the price of defying Moscow. So when George W. Bush recently chose Budapest to send a message to today's masters of the Kremlin, marking the 50th anniversary of the 1956 uprising that was crushed by Soviet tanks, the event was heavy with symbolism. "The sacrifice of the Hungarian people inspires all who love liberty," said Bush as he laid flowers at a memorial to the uprising's victims. "We resolve that when people stand up for their freedom, America will stand with them."Why the cold war rhetoric? In Budapest, there wasn't much doubt that the "freedom-loving" people Bush had in mind were citizens of former Soviet Union countries, like Ukraine and Georgia, still struggling to break free of Moscow's influence. But beyond all this lies a bigger geopolitical game being waged every bit as aggressively as the old cold war. Today's tug of war features energy, not tanks, and will be very much in evidence at next month's G8 conference in St. Petersburg...

Money Changes Everything

Oil cities are now lit up by windfall profits around the world, but only Kazakhstan has one where none existed before. It's the brainchild of President Nursultan Nazarbayev, who declared in 1997 that the capital would move from Almaty, near the Chinese border, to a place closer to the geographic center of the country. Ministries, embassies and the offices of the state oil company were moved by administrative fiat. Private businesses and people followed, complaining all the way. But there's no saying no to Nazarbayev. The city of Astana now has a population of about 600,000, out of a planned future total of 1.5 million.There's nothing quite like the spectacle of skyscrapers rising in the wind-blasted steppes of central Kazakhstan. Astana's original designs were drawn up by the Saudi contractor Sheik Bakr bin Laden, elder half brother to Osama, and control of the project has since passed to a wider consortium of developers. (The bin Ladens still own more than 100 hectares of land in...

Balancing Act

Vladimir Putin sternly told Russia's Parliament last month that the Kremlin was launching a drive to "stamp out corruption." Forgive the management of Motorola for cracking a wry smile. The company has discovered the hard way that, in Russia, following the rules isn't quite enough to stay on the right side of the law.When a shipment of 167,500 Motorola mobile phones worth $19 million was confiscated at Moscow airport in March, police initially told bewildered Motorola reps that Customs duties hadn't been paid. Then the authorities changed their story, the company says. The phones were allegedly emitting unsafe levels of radiation, police claimed, and 50,000 handsets had been destroyed on health grounds. When the company produced a sheaf of certifications showing that its product was safe, a mysterious Moscow-based company filed suit that Motorola was in breach of a Russian patent--and demanded money for allowing the company to distribute its products in Russia.The last straw came...

Beginning of the End?

The scene was sadly familiar, especially in the strife-torn Middle East. In the shadow of a great mosque, a crowd of 40,000 gathered to bury a victim of political violence--and vent their rage at the authorities. But this was not Iraq or the Palestinian territories. It was downtown Ankara. Nor were the demonstrators angry Islamist fanatics. They were judges, bureaucrats and businessmen, staunch secularists shouting out their loyalty to the state--and denouncing a government they say is taking Turkey down a dangerously Islamic path. "Turkey is secular and will remain secular," they chanted. "Turkey will not become an Iran."The occasion was the funeral of Judge Mustafa Yucel Ozbilgin, killed by a 28-year-old lawyer who opened fire recently inside Turkey's High Court. The gunman's motives are not yet clear, but the presumption of most in the crowd was that he was a militant Islamist getting revenge for a court ruling last November that upheld restrictions on the wearing of headscarves...

Behind Closed Doors

Along the Rublevo-Uspenskoye highway outside Moscow, a riotous jumble of mansions poke out from above the high fences: the gabled mansards of French châteaux, the pointed tops of Gothic castle towers and baroque dormer windows--all built a decade ago by a generation of Russians who had plenty of money but a deficit of taste. Venture a little farther afield, however, and you'll see something altogether more harmonious: new, gated developments like Benelux, where northern European-style cottages nestle among landscaped paths and newly planted mature trees, and Knazhiye Ozero, where discreet, chaletlike mansions surround a small lake. For up-and-coming Moscow millionaires, over-the-top mini-estates are out; understated, self-contained, luxury communities are in.And not just in Moscow. All over the world, high-end planned communities are springing up, driven by demand from wealthy customers who want to live not only in luxurious homes but in luxurious environments, among their own. From...

Kurdistan: Dangerous Passage

Could another front be opening in the Iraq war? Over recent weeks, some 200,000 Turkish troops, backed by tanks and helicopter gunships, have massed along the mountainous border with Iraq. Trucks passing from Turkey, ferrying the imported goods and foodstuffs that are the lifeblood of the Kurdish economy, have slowed from 1,000 a day to just a couple of hundred. The Turkish military says its troops are there only to prevent armed insurgents of the Kurdish PKK rebel group from crossing into Turkey from their bases on Iraq's Kandil Mountain. But last week, according to angry Foreign Ministry officials in Baghdad, Turkish commandos briefly crossed 15 kilometers into Iraqi territory in pursuit of PKK rebels--a move that could signal dangerous new frictions to come.Compared with the rest of the country, Iraqi Kurdistan has been a haven of stability--still subject to insurgent bombings, but generally free of the kind of sectarian violence that has racked Baghdad and other major cities in...

Sliding Backward

Whatever happened to Recep Tayyip Erdogan, the outspoken prime minister whose bold reforms brought Turkey to the very threshold of Europe? He was a rebel who loosened the Turkish military's stranglehold on political power. He brought cultural rights to the country's Kurdish minority and overhauled a quasi-totalitarian legal system. But these days? He sounds more and more like the reactionary old guard he came to power vowing to overturn.Consider some contrasts. Last August Erdogan electrified crowds in the largely Kurdish city of Diyarbakir by telling them they were citizens with equal rights. But earlier this month, after a week of rioting, he warned Kurdish protesters, "Don't you dare test the power of the state." Last year Erdogan defied nationalists at home by agreeing to open Turkish ports and airports to Greek Cypriot vessels and aircraft, the price the European Union demanded for starting EU accession talks. Now he's backpedaling. Erdogan came to power preaching tolerance and...

Reversal of Fortune

Peter the Great built St. Petersburg in hopes that its sweeping neoclassical boulevards would prove to a skeptical Europe that Russia was no longer a barbarous Asian principality but part of mainstream Western civilization. As Vladimir Putin prepares to host this summer's G8 summit in the old imperial capital, he faces a similar challenge. Buoyed by a windfall of petrodollars, Russia's president has transformed his country from a dysfunctional, debt-ridden post-Soviet wasteland into a major world economic and political player. All that's missing is recognition from his peers that Russia is a full member in the club of the world's leading industrialized, democratic nations.He's likely to be kept waiting. Instead of a triumph, the St Petersburg summit is fast shaping up as the biggest rethink of Russia's relationship with the West since the collapse of the Soviet Union. Rather than the recognition that Putin craves, there's talk of diluting Russia's G8 membership with a revival of the...

Past as Prologue

Once, not so long ago, Europe saw itself as the Middle East's honest broker, poised between a hard-line United States and an equally intransigent Muslim world. At the same time Russia, once a regional superpower, was... nowhere. While the European Union played mediator in conflicts from Palestine to Iran, Russia contented itself with hawking a few weapons systems and tending its own post-Soviet backyard.What a difference a couple of years can make. In the wake of Hamas's Palestinian election win and Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadine-jad's defiance over his country's uranium-enrichment program, Europe is edging ever closer to the tougher stance taken by the United States. Meanwhile, a newly confident Russia has stepped into Europe's shoes as middleman between East and West, reaching out to the region's untouchables--and making it clear that Moscow won't be taking orders from anyone.Earlier this month, President Vladimir Putin outraged the United States and Israel by inviting the...

The Last Word: Sergei Kiriyenko

Sergei Kiriyenko may hold the key to re-solving the Iranian nuclear crisis. The former Russian prime minister and the head of RosAtom, the Russian nuclear agency, will meet a delegation from Tehran this week to discuss a proposed deal whereby Moscow would provide Iran with enriched uranium for its nuclear plants, including a Russian-built reactor at Bushehr. Tehranoriginally rejected the plan, but with possible Security Council action looming, has recently revived its prospects. NEWSWEEK's Owen Matthews spoke with Kiriyenko, who hopes the deal will also bolster Russia's profitable nuclear industry, in Moscow. Excerpts:Russia has already made one agreement with Iran to return their spent nuclear fuel to Russia. That guarantees that no plutonium can be extracted from the fuel. Second, we've put a proposal on the table to jointly create an enterprise for enriching uranium on Russian territory. The conditions of such a joint venture would be that Iran would contribute to its funding. In...

Russian Nukes Redux

Is energy the nuclear weapon of the 21st century? In recent months, Russia has shown that control of gas supplies to its neighbors can be a potent political tool. But when Vladimir Putin was asked exactly that question last week, he disagreed. "We still have plenty of nuclear rockets too," boasted Putin. "We recently carried out tests on new ballistic-weapon systems, weapons which no other country in the world has." The new Russian systems, he said, "don't care if there is a missile-defense system or not." In other words, for Putin, nukes are the nukes of the 21st century.Only one country in the world--America--is actually developing a missile defense system. So why, in an era when Russia and the United States enjoy friendly relations, do Russian leaders feel the need to revamp the country's nuclear arsenal, and add a new nuclear warhead designed specifically to penetrate the U.S. defenses? For the Kremlin's part, Putin sees nukes as Russia's membership card to the world's top table...

Betting on a Gusher

Vladimir Putin is betting big on oil and gas. for the first time in its 40-year history, the state gas giant Gazprom plans to allow foreign investors to buy its stock directly, perhaps as early as the end of January, on the St. Petersburg Stock Exchange.This month's offer was to be the first step in a campaign to make Gazprom the ExxonMobil of Russia, one of the world's great energy companies. Indeed, Putin had installed his old friend Alexey Miller,43, as CEO of Gazprom in 2001, with a mandate to rid the former state monopoly of the privateering, corruption and cronyism that had overtaken it after the fall of the Soviet Union. And Miller and his new lieutenants have vowed to make Gazprom "the largest energy business in the world" by 2010.It certainly has the potential. Gazprom is the top global supplier of natural gas, controlling 16 percent of the known reserves, and a top-20 oil company. It's aggressively expanding into lucrative new markets in Western Europe with a $5 billion...

Hoping For A Gusher

Gazprom's bosses expected to make headlines this month--not because of Russia's gas war with Ukraine, but because of a stock offer that could hail the emergence of a new leader in the world energy market. For the first time in the gas giant's 40-year history, Gazprom is allowing foreigners to buy a hefty 49 percent of its stock--possibly as early as the end of January on the St. Petersburg Stock Exchange. The move is to be the first step in a campaign to make Gazprom one of the world's great energy majors; in fact, CEO Alexei Miller expects Gazprom to be "the largest energy business in the world within five years." That may sound grandiose, but it's not impossible for a company with more assets than most major oil companies.In other circumstances, the opportunity to buy into some of the world's largest and most undervalued oil and gas reserves would trigger a gusher of interest. Not so with Gazprom. The Ukraine fiasco exposed the company as, first and foremost, a tool for enforcing...

Reining in the Army

Seferi Yilmaz was sitting with friends in his bookshop, in the remote mountain town of Semdinli in southeastern Turkey, when the grenade came rolling in. He dived for a back door just in time. The blast blew out the front of the shop and left two dead. There was little doubt that Yilmaz, a former Kurdish rebel who had served 15 years in jail for terrorism, was the intended target. Five Turkish soldiers were killed in rebel attacks around Semdinli over the last six months, and anonymous leaflets threatening revenge had been circulating in the town. On Nov. 1, a mysterious bomb blast downtown wrecked several shops and houses and injured dozens. The question was, who wanted Seferi Yilmaz dead?The answer has shocked Turkey--and touched off a scandal that could rock the country's powerful security forces to the core. A crowd of townspeople caught four apparent perpetrators as they ran from Yilmaz's devastated shop and made a fair attempt at beating them to death. According to...

War: Helping a Young Boy

The image in NEWSWEEK moved readers around the world: by a roadside in Tall Afar, Iraq, terrified children stand spattered with their parents' blood. In January, a U.S. patrol had opened fire on the Hassan family's car, killing both parents and paralyzing Rakan, 12. Offers of help poured in from across America, but in the fog of war, the boy lay untreated. Local doctors couldn't help him, and the U.S. military offered only a condolence payment of $1,500 per parent, initially refusing to treat or transport the boy. Aid worker Marla Ruzicka took up his cause--but was killed by a car bomb in April as she lobbied the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad for a rush humanitarian visa. ("It's hard to get all the facts in a situation like this," admits an embassy spokesperson. "It can take longer than we'd like.") Finally, after an intervention by Sen. Ted Kennedy and the humanitarian group Project Hope, Rakan left Iraq on an Air Force plane last month and is now in intensive physical therapy at the...

THE ENEMIES WITHIN

It looked like the bad old days when Turkey's universities were hot-beds of political strife. On one side of the police barriers were dozens of young students, many with their mouths taped shut to symbolize their support for free speech. On the other was an older crowd of about 200 ulkucu--mostly mustached ultranationalists waving Turkish flags and banners. Slogans were chanted, then abuse; a few missiles sailed through the air. In between, some rather bewildered international historians scuttled into a conference hall amid shouts of "Traitors!" Their subject? The fate of the Ottoman Empire's Armenians during World War I.In truth, it wasn't 1915 that roused such passions last week at Istanbul's Bilgi University. The real issue is what kind of country Turkey will become. There are those who want Turkey to openly examine its past, rid itself of the legacy of military rule and become truly European. And there are others, mostly conservative nationalists, who cling to the past and fear...

MONEY TALKS

You're a pious Muslim with few million in oil dollars to invest. You want to put your money to work--but the Qur'an forbids you to lend money for profit, or to sponsor un-Islamic activities such as gambling, tobacco and pork products. So would the perfect Islamic bank for you be perhaps Citigroup? HSBC? ABN AMRO?Actually, yes. Giant Western banks--or, rather, their Islamic banking subsidiaries--are leading the market for financing that complies with Qur'anic laws on money-lending. Bahrain-based Citi Islamic, a subsidiary of Citigroup that was first into the market in 1996, now leads the pack with deposits of more than $6 billion. Citi and at least 10 other Western majors dwarf the biggest locally owned rival, the Bahrain-based Al Baraka, worth a little more than half a billion. And though still a niche market, Islamic financing is booming. Sharia-compliant bank deposits now top $265 billion, estimates Islamic Banking and Finance magazine, and other investments are worth a further ...

Kemal Dervis: A Fireman's New Blaze

Recently named head of the United Nations Development Program, Kemal Dervis is the first of what U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan hopes will be a series of prominent outsiders brought in to head U.N. agencies under new rules that open senior jobs to international competition. Dervis, a former World Bank executive, was credited with saving the Turkish economy from disaster after a currency crash in May 2001. His steady management turned a crisis into an opportunity: aided by a massive IMF bailout, the inflation-plagued Turkish state finally imposed fiscal discipline, and a cronyish banking sector was heavily pruned. U.N. critics hope that Dervis will bring new dynamism to the UNDP. NEWSWEEK's Owen Matthews spoke to Dervis in Istanbul. Excerpts: ...

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