Richard Wolffe

Stories by Richard Wolffe

  • Singing Different Tunes

    They are the states the candidates forgot. Utah, Idaho and Hawaii dropped off the traveling schedules of the surviving contenders for the Democratic nomination for president (with the exception of Dennis Kucinich, who found a fine excuse for a couple of tropical trips). Yet the voters of those three great states pointed clearly to what lies ahead in next week's showdown on Super Tuesday. Sure, there may be the world of difference between Salt Lake City and San Francisco. But the numbers are surprisingly similar.Kerry swept Tuesday's contests with more than 50 percent of the vote in Utah and Idaho, and only a little less (46 percent) in Hawaii. That tracks closely with Kerry's latest figures in the far bigger states next week. In New York, the most recent polls give Kerry between 53 and 66 percent of the vote. In California he's also running at more than 50 percent, and in the crucial swing state of Ohio he's around 45 percent. The three states that just voted may be relatively...
  • A Win is a Win

    Just when he thought it was safe to turn his fire on George W. Bush, John Kerry was ambushed in Wisconsin by an old political foe: high expectations. Less than a week ago the polls gave Kerry a 37-point lead over John Edwards, setting the bar sky high for the Democratic frontrunner in the Badger state. The numbers were only 31 points wide of the mark. "A win is a win," Kerry said as the exit polls gave the first hint of a surprise. That was the mantra his aides repeated over and over as the TV screens showed a razor-thin gap between the senators from Massachusetts and North Carolina.A win is indeed a win, even if it's Kerry's slender 6-point victory in Wisconsin. But as Bill Clinton showed in New Hampshire 12 years ago, a strong second place can also be a win-as long as you beat expectations. John Edwards leaves Wisconsin with a new lease of life, especially from the fundraisers who must bankroll a nationwide, two-week race towards Super Tuesday's primaries. (In contrast, a distant...
  • RUN TO DAYLIGHT

    After all the cheap motels, the long hours on the road and two bruising defeats, they were looking forward to regrouping back home in Burlington, Vt. But when Howard Dean's senior aides met the day after their latest failure in New Hampshire, it was anything but a cozy get-together. At a downtown law firm's offices, Dean cleared a private room to sit alone with Joe Trippi, his unsuspecting and bedraggled campaign manager. To the outside world Trippi once looked like the lone mastermind, the creator of the Internet-driven machine that had lifted the former Vermont governor from obscurity to the front of the pack last year. But inside the campaign, he was actually losing endless battles with Dean's inner circle of Vermont aides, Kate O'Connor and Bob Rogan, over control of the campaign's cash pile and the candidate's road trips. Now, after burning through $40 million and a double-digit lead in the polls, it was Dean who was pushing Trippi aside in favor of Roy Neel, a cool Washington...
  • Moving On

    John Kerry had just won big victories in two critical states, almost burying what remains of a bitter rival who once buried him. But instead of a high-pitched celebration, Kerry hit what may well be the defining note of his White House race. "They're the ones who are extreme," he said at the Jefferson-Jackson dinner in Richmond, Virginia, on Saturday. "We're the ones who are mainstream."He wasn't talking about Howard Dean's anti-war activists. In fact Kerry made no mention of the survivors in the Democratic presidential slugfest. After two thumping victories in Washington state (by 19 points) and Michigan (by 35 points), Kerry resisted the temptation to declare he owned what was once Dean Country. Nor did the Massachusetts senator gloat when he won Maine by 19 points on Sunday.Instead, the clear Democratic frontrunner used the media spotlight on Saturday to launch a pre-emptive strike on the Bush-Cheney '04 campaign. The president may have close to $200 million to spend on defining...
  • Can He Keep Winning?

    The first word of John Kerry's big win came as his Boeing 737 jet prepared to land in Seattle on Tuesday. The Massachusetts senator was shooting the breeze with some reporters, who were scrolling through their Blackberries for the latest results and exit polls from the seven states that voted in Democratic presidential contests yesterday. "You got 51 per cent in Missouri," one TV producer called out. Kerry raised an eyebrow and smiled serenely. "That's fabulous," he said, "I'm very pleased with that. I'll take 50 per cent anywhere, any time." But what about South Carolina, where he was heading for his first loss (and a 15-point one at that)? "We expected that pretty much," he shrugged. "I think coming in second is enormous, given where I've been."One of the biggest signs of a campaign's runaway success is when the candidate can be understated in victory and encouraged by defeat. Another is when his target shifts from his party rivals to his ultimate opponent: George W. Bush. Kerry...
  • Comeback Kerry

    Victory rallies are always tough when you lose. But they're even tougher when your last celebration ranks as one of the worst self-inflicted wounds in recent political history. So when Howard Dean stepped on stage inside the cavernous gym at Southern New Hampshire University on Tuesday, the sense of expectation was almost greater than waiting for the results. This time it was the crowd, not the candidate, that went wild. For at least five minutes, the former Democratic front runner could only say "Wow!" as his fans roared his name and stomped their feet, ignoring the fact that they'd lost by another double-digit margin. Dean's most public display of emotion was to arch his eyebrows, several times.Last night belonged unquestionably to John Kerry. The Massachusetts senator took a strong first place in the New Hampshire primary, drawing 39 percent of the vote statewide by the time 97 percent of the precincts had reported. Dean came in second with 26 percent; Wesley Clark and John...
  • Worlds Apart

    It's a long, long way from the Midwest to the Middle East. But voters in Iowa and Iraq have rarely shared so much at any point in their vastly different histories.Four years ago in the Democratic presidential race, the debate in Iowa was dominated by farming subsidies, agricultural mergers and occasional references to prescription drugs. Today the Democratic frontrunner cannot stand before an unsuspecting group of Iowans without citing the name of Saddam Hussein at least three times. Howard Dean spits out Saddam's hometown of Tikrit as if it were half way to Omaha, Nebraska.Dean's Iraq strategy in Iowa may be just a sign of an excruciatingly close race that has less than a week to run. After all, it was Iraq that first propelled the obscure doctor to the front of the pack last year. And Iraq remains by far the biggest challenge for the Bush White House--a challenge big enough and unpredictable enough to shape its chances of reelection.But can Iraq really help Democrats decide who...
  • Q&Amp;A: 'When I'm Pushed, I Tend To Push Back'

    It was a big week for Howard Dean. Al Gore's Dec. 9 endorsement of Dean solidified his position as the Democratic front runner. But news of the capture of Saddam Hussein on Sunday threw Dean on the defensive. NEWSWEEK's Jonathan Alter and Richard Wolffe interviewed Dean both before and after the latest events in Iraq. Excerpts:NEWSWEEK: You said this week that the United States is no safer after Saddam's capture. Even though there's no evidence he had WMD, aren't we safer not having to worry about his developing them in the future?Howard Dean: We would be a lot safer if we vastly increased the amount of money we spent to track down known nuclear materials from the former Soviet Union and elsewhere--as I proposed this week--and if we paid more attention to North Korea, which is on the verge of becoming a nuclear power. These are not hypothetical instances, they are urgent national-security matters. Yet this administration was determined to pursue what appears at times to be a...
  • Diplomatic Diary: Where They Stand

    Maybe it was Saddam Hussein's capture. Or maybe it's because there's not much more than a month before the voting starts in Iowa. Either way, the Democratic pack of presidential candidates have spent the last few days sharpening their rhetoric on foreign policy--and on one bogeyman in particular. Not the former Iraqi president, but the former Vermont governor.Everyone says that Howard Dean has pulled away from the pack because of his position on the war in Iraq. Of course that means everyone is ignoring everything else Dean and his campaign have achieved. But Dean's foreign policy remains the single biggest defining factor in the Democratic race so far. In fact, he's done almost as much to define the rest of the field as George W. Bush. As Bush's polls rise in the wake of Saddam's arrest, and Dean comes under new fire, it's worth taking another look at the leading Democrats' foreign policy.DEANIn journalistic shorthand, Howard Dean is the antiwar candidate. In truth, he is more...
  • Diplomatic Diary: Let's Face It

    Judging by the protests, you could be forgiven for thinking one of two things as George W. Bush arrives in London today. Either the British have lost all sense of hospitality, or the president is flying into enemy territory. YES, IT MAY BE just the usual anarchists who get their faces on TV. Yes, it's their right to say what they want and demonstrate as they please. But the sense of foreboding about the first state visit by an American president to Buckingham Palace speaks volumes about the British view of the trans-Atlantic relationship. It's not just the dark threats of an Al Qaeda attack. It's the gloomy sense in London's political circles that Nothing Good Will Come of This.Time and again, the question posed in Britain about Bush's trip is deceptively simple: Why? Why is Bush in London at all? Why would a British prime minister want to be associated with him? Why is Tony Blair such a poodle?It's all the same question, and all the same problem. And in spite of appearances, the...
  • 'The Deficits Are Quite Manageable'

    They may be polar opposites when it comes to the Bush tax cuts. But there was a time when Stephen Friedman and Robert Rubin shared an economic outlook and even the same job. Friedman and Rubin were co-chairmen of the investment bank Goldman Sachs a decade ago, and like Rubin, Friedman was once a deficit hawk. Friedman now heads the National Economic Council inside the White House (a job that was first created for Rubin). NEWSWEEK's Richard Wolffe spoke to Friedman after he returned from a tour of the West Coast last week, where he was talking to businesses about tax cuts, investment and regulatory reforms.WOLFFE: Robert Rubin says the Bush administration "dismissed mainstream views" about the harm caused by big deficits. What's your response?FRIEDMAN: We believe the deficits are quite manageable. No one is pleased by the deficits. The president has laid out a strong plan to cut the deficits in half within the next five years. We think the way to do it is by pro-growth policies and...
  • Diplomatic Diary: Foreign Policy Candidate

    As a former general who led NATO forces in the Kosovo conflict, Wesley Clark may well have the most expertise in world affairs of any presidential candidate in 2004. But as he gets ready to launch his presidential campaign on Wednesday, Clark needs a little intel on the weird world affairs of election politics.Of course, foreign policy is vitally important in any election for the White House, not least because the candidates hope to become commander-in-chief. And in this election, with at least two continuing military operations in Afghanistan and Iraq, foreign policy may loom larger than in any other election since the Vietnam era.But the foreign policy of a presidential debate is often far removed from reality. During the Republican primaries in 2000, the most important figure on the world stage was not Saddam Hussein but a small Cuban boy who had washed up on Florida's shores: Elian Gonzalez. In fact, it was the primaries themselves that elevated Elian's story to national and...
  • Diplomatic Diary: Not Just Name-Calling

    Which country do you think is the greatest threat to world security? If you named any member of the "axis of evil"--a nuclear-armed North Korea, a terrorist-sponsoring Iran or a lawless Iraq--you'd have come close to our friends across the Atlantic. According to a European Union poll of more than 7,500 Europeans, more than half (some 52 per cent) placed the founding members of the so-called axis close to the top of their list of threats to the planet. Only they added a couple of nations to join the ranks of the world's greatest evildoers. Precisely the same number of Europeans said America was a threat to world peace, ranking the Bush administration alongside Kim Jong Il's tyranny in Pyongyang and the hard-line theocracy of Tehran. In fact, the United States was only beaten into joint second place by a country that has never sponsored terrorist attacks on European soil. A staggering 59 per cent of this huge poll--released this week--placed Israel at the top of the list of world...
  • How North Korea Got The Bomb

    Few North Koreans have suffered more directly for Pyongyang's nuclear ambitions than Kimchaek University's class of '62. Shortly before graduation day, the campus began buzzing with news that atomic scientists were needed for a new research lab being built for the "Great Leader," Kim Il Sung. "Our professors really pushed the need for nuclear development," recalls one class member who escaped the country two years ago and recently told NEWSWEEK his story. "The rumor circulating among students was that those of us sent there wouldn't have long to live."The defector can't be sure how many of his friends died young. He was lucky enough to be assigned elsewhere after college. As years passed, though, he kept running into former classmates who were wasting away from radiation sickness. "It was exactly what we feared," the defector says. "Many of them lost their eyebrows. Some of them had constant nosebleeds. They looked so weak it was hard to even face them." He blames the government's...
  • Bush's News War

    It started out as a little crowd control in Baghdad. But as U.S. troops entered the streets to restore order earlier this month, the protest turned ugly. Someone threw a homemade grenade at the Americans, wounding 13 servicemen. According to the Oct. 8 Daily Threat Assessment--the Coalition's internal casualty report, which was shown to NEWSWEEK--eight soldiers were wounded seriously enough to be evacuated to military hospitals. Yet at a press conference the next day, there was no mention of the attack. Pushed by reporters, U.S. officials would only say the incident was under investigation. It was as if the ambush, and the casualties, had never happened.In Baghdad, official control over the news is getting tighter. Journalists used to walk freely into the city's hospitals and the morgue to keep count of the day's dead and wounded. Now the hospitals have been declared off-limits and morgue officials turn away reporters who aren't accompanied by a Coalition escort. Iraqi police refer...
  • A Man With A Mission

    At a little before 6 each morning, a wiry, 27-year-old political operative fires up his computer in his Washington, D.C., apartment. While other Democratic spinners are still in bed, dreaming about their next power breakfast, stubble-faced, bleary-eyed David Sirota is already at the keyboard, hacking out a daily barrage of anti-Bush media clips, commentary and snappy quotes. Sirota's e-mails--sent to the capital's journalists and political pros--tend to portray President Bush as a bullying huckster (Sirota branded the illegal leak of a CIA agent's name "Intimigate"). But they occasionally cause the administration genuine headaches. One Sirota blast last month diverted Colin Powell from an exhaustive round of talks at the United Nations. Working on a tip from an obscure Australian Web site, Sirota unearthed an embarrassing comment the secretary of State made two years ago. In Cairo, Powell had said that Iraq posed no threat to its neighbors, and possessed no "significant capability"...
  • Diplomatic Diary: Bush's Good-News Agenda

    Has Iraq turned the corner? At the White House and throughout the Bush administration, they'd like us to believe that the corner is far behind them. Electricity is now in greater supply than it was before the war. Iraqi police training is well under way. The economy is showing signs of life.Yet as you pick up the newspapers or tune into cable news, there is no escaping the dismal facts of life on the ground. On Tuesday a car bomb detonated outside the Turkish embassy in Baghdad, just two days after a suicide bomber struck at the hotel headquarters of U.S. security officials, killing eight people.For the moment, the administration is blaming the media for this parallel universe. The negative picture of Iraq has been painted in the twisted minds of news executives and their liberal allies. Either journalists are morbidly fascinated by death and destruction or they are colluding in political manipulation of the facts on the ground.It was George W. Bush himself who best delivered that...
  • Arafat: No Way Out: The Mideast In Deepening Chao

    Yom Kippur, the Jewish day of atonement, is a time of deep reflection and symbolism about the challenges that life presents. In the midst of another cycle of violence in Israel, that symbolism rarely felt heavier. A suicide bomb in the northern port city of Haifa left at least 19 dead on the Sabbath before Yom Kippur, and pushed the Israeli government another step closer to removing Palestinian Chairman Yasir Arafat.In public, the Bush administration recited the usual condemnations and offered the familiar condolences. But between the lines of the statements, and in private conversations with the region's leaders, there is a sense that the United States has reached the end of the line. The White House is stuck with an Israeli leader it will not oppose and a Palestinian leader it cannot abide. The White House used to talk about peace in the Mideast. Now the talk focuses on how to stop the region from falling into the abyss.In a written statement, President Bush never mentioned Arafat...
  • Force Versus Diplomacy

    The world has split into two. On one side, there are the anti-war peaceniks who thought the United Nations and its weapons inspectors could keep Saddam Hussein in his box. On the other, there are the hawkish warmongers who thought Saddam was already out of his box and building the bomb. Both sides know in their heart of hearts that they are right and their opponents are both dangerous and dumb. If anything, in the months since Saddam fled Baghdad, the divide between them has only grown deeper and more scornful.But what if both sides were right? What if the U.N. had worked in part and failed in part? What if war had succeeded and faltered at the same time? Then where would we be?We'd be living in the real world--which turns out to be the same world as David Kay's, the man leading the hunt for Saddam's weapons in Iraq. Most of the headlines about Kay's interim report picked out one glaring fact: Kay has found no weapons of mass destruction. That is indeed striking, and worrying for...
  • Phoenix From The Ashes

    Inside the dowdy lobby of the United Nations headquarters, opposite a collection of children's paintings about world peace, there's a photo display of about two dozen U.N. officials. Through the course of last week, as the world's leaders met nearby, a steady procession of U.N. staff would walk up to the photos, shake their heads and sigh.The photos are only the most visible reminder of the United Nations' trauma since a truck bomb destroyed its offices in Baghdad last month. To U.N. officials, the pictures of their fallen colleagues are a daily reminder of the deep sense of dismay and discomfort they feel about rebuilding Iraq.For Kofi Annan, the United Nations' mild-mannered secretary-general, Iraq has become the biggest personal and professional crisis of his career. Annan was already taking the heat from world leaders--especially in South Africa, Brazil and the gulf states--to condemn President George W. Bush's war and his roughing up of the Security Council earlier this year....
  • Diplomatic Diary: Credibility Gap

    It started out as just 16 words in the president's State of the Union address. But like all good examples of political chaos theory, it's the smallest details that can cause the biggest dislocations. If only the White House had dropped the brief line about Saddam's nuclear program and the link with Africa. That, at least, was the sentiment inside the Bush administration back in July, when it first got a taste of the kind of trial by fire that Tony Blair, the British prime minister, has been enduring for months.Back then, at the start of summer, the White House halted the runaway train by tying two senior officials to the track: George Tenet, the director of the CIA, and Stephen Hadley, deputy national security advisor to the president. With not one but two officials sacrificing themselves (at least with public admissions of guilt), the seemingly technical story just evaporated into the summer heat. But the truth is that the story never went away. The White House tactics of dumping...
  • Diplomatic Diary: Short On Friends

    One year ago, George W. Bush stood in front of the green-marble podium inside the United Nations to issue a stark challenge to the rest of the world. Iraq, he said, was a mortal threat to the U.N. and to peace. "All the world now faces a test, and the United Nations a difficult and defining moment," he warned. "Will the United Nations serve the purpose of its founding, or will it be irrelevant?"By most measures, the U.N. flunked the Bush test. The Security Council spoke of serious consequences, but refused to support the war. In the president's terms, the U.N. was now irrelevant.Yet there was President Bush again on Tuesday, standing by the same green marble. On the sidelines, his diplomats were pressing for U.N. help to rebuild Iraq while Bush made his own case. Rather than irrelevent, the United Nations he described in his speech is doing "vital and effective work" in Iraq. According to the president, the U.N. is now even united about its "fundamental principles" including global...
  • Here We Go Again

    Another Iraq resolution, another go-round at the U.N. Security Council. Surely it couldn't be as bad as the last time, when those warmongering Americans and Brits slapped down the Franco-German "axis of weasels" and invaded--right on schedule. The war was won, Iraq was liberated. True, there's the matter of the missing WMD, not to mention a spot of bother on the postwar road to peace and reconstruction. Now come the Americans, hat in hand, asking the United Nations for a little help. Surely, we'll all be spared the rancor and recrimination of last winter, won't we?Not a chance. If anything, the next confrontation promises to be as nasty as the last, and possibly more damaging to the transatlantic relationship. Reason: the Bush administration is desperate. With Iraq in chaos, it needs the semblance of multinational cooperation more than ever. And this time, it's personal. President George W. Bush was angry with Germany and France half a year ago; this time, with the 2004 elections,...
  • Diplomatic Diary: Style Over Substance

    It's turning into an end-of-summer ritual, as seasonal as the cooler air and the start of the school year. If it's September, it must be time to talk Iraq to the United Nations.This year, judging by the press coverage, you might think we're headed for one of two versions of fall at the U.N.. Either the Bush administration has just reversed its go-it-alone policy and the world is about to give itself one giant group hug in Iraq. Or the rest of the world (led by those ever-untrustworthy French and Germans) are going to slash and burn the latest olive branch from President Bush.In fact, there is a third scenario that is far more likely--and far closer to what happened in New York last year. Amid all the fanfare about Bush's challenge to the U.N. last September, and the anti-Saddam resolution that followed, one thing is now clear: nothing much changed. The United States invaded Iraq with just the British on board, and most of the rest of the world turned away. In reality, all sides got...
  • Diplomatic Diary: The Failure Of Rhetoric

    Just one week after the war against the Taliban began, George W. Bush issued a series of promises that might sound a little familiar by now.He pledged to work with other nations to make the country stable once the battle was won. He suggested the United Nations could play a vital role by taking over "the so-called nation-building" after the war. "I would call it the stabilization of a future government," he told reporters at a White House press conference. He even promised to "stay the course" to win the wider war against terror.That was October 2001 and the country in question was Afghanistan. Almost two years later, it's worth looking back at the first battleground in the war on terror if you want to look forward to figure out the future of Iraq.Two years is hardly staying the course, but even in that short period, the White House--along with its allies--has largely failed to live up to its rhetoric in Afghanistan. Take the Bush administration's current focus, for instance. In...
  • Diplomatic Diary: The Ever-Expanding War on Terror

    Make no mistake: the war on terror just expanded. As President Bush and his senior officials fan out across the media and the country making big speeches this week, it's clear they are preparing America and the world for what's to come in Iraq. And what's to come is a far longer, more ambitious project than anyone imagined.Of course, the White House always said it would be long. But that was in the days when it was just fighting Al Qaeda, and the shadowy terrorist network was hard to hunt down. After those post-9-11 weeks, the war expanded in two other ways. The first was the shift from Al Qaeda to weapons of mass destruction in Iraq. The second was what we've seen over the last week or so: the shift from Iraq to the broader Middle East.The war on terror is such an elastic phrase, it can mean almost anything you want. Today, White House officials say the war on terror that began on 9-11 has moved to what they call "three main theaters"--Iraq, Afghanistan, and the Palestinian...
  • Diplomatic Diary: The Real Target

    It wasn't just the United Nations headquarters in Baghdad that was blown apart by Tuesday's truck bomb. It was the long-standing hope and belief inside Washington that some day soon the reconstruction of Iraq would turn around from torment to triumph.The deaths of at least 20 U.N. workers and Iraqis--including Sergio Vieira de Mello, the U.N. Secretary General's special representative in Iraq--were devastating in themselves. But like all acts of terrorism, the political target was just as important. That target was the reconstruction process itself, especially the prospect that Iraqi citizens or the international community could help the United States in its grand vision for Iraq's democratic future.In the past week alone, terrorists blew up the water supply to parts of Baghdad as well as the newly reopened oil pipeline to Turkey. The former was supposed to keep Iraqis alive in the searing heat of the summer; the latter was supposed to keep the new Iraqi government alive with some...
  • Diplomatic Diary: Two Allies--And Two Brothers

    What kind of alliance is there left between the United States and Saudi Arabia? First came the second-guessing over the pre-9/11 intelligence after last week's congressional report. Now the really lasting impact of that report looks like the further weakening of ties between Washington and Riyadh.Prince Saud Al Faisal, the Saudi foreign minister, pleaded with President George W. Bush on Tuesday to declassify some 28 blank pages dealing with Saudi Arabia. Saudi officials said they were desperate to rebut in public the suggestion that Saudi officials supported the 9/11 hijackers. Yet in an unusually public dispute for what is traditionally a highly private relationship, the U.S. president said no. "It makes no sense to declassify when we've got an ongoing investigation," Bush said at a Rose Garden news conference. "That could jeopardize that investigation. And it made no sense to declassify ... during the war on terror, because it would help the enemy if they knew our sources and...
  • Walking Into Trouble

    The phone rang at 5 a.m. in early July at the home of a North Korea expert in the Bush administration. The caller had serious news from the U.S. Air Force's nuclear-detection team. For months the team had been sampling the air above the Yongbyon nuclear complex, looking for evidence that the facility was back in the arms business. Now there was no doubt: the team's sensors had detected the radioactive gas Krypton-85--proof that the North was turning its stockpile of spent fuel rods into weapons-grade plutonium, just as dictator Kim Jong Il had been threatening. And what was the reaction to the dawn alert? "I was back to sleep in 30 seconds," the expert told NEWSWEEK.If Bush's advisers are at all worried by North Korea's doomsday behavior, they're doing a great job of hiding it. South Korea's military analysts are predicting that military conflict could come before winter. The warning was echoed in a Washington Post interview last week by former Defense secretary William Perry. Yet U...
  • Diplomatic Diary: The End Of The Crown Princes

    Call it the tale of three corpses. The first two marked the end of one of the biggest mysteries in Iraq. The third marks the beginning of one of the biggest mysteries in London.The deaths of Uday and Qusay--confirmed on Tuesday by U.S. CENTCOM in Iraq--represent more than just the delivery of American justice to the murderous and sometimes psychotic sons of Saddam Hussein. Their demise in a protracted battle in the northern Iraq city of Mosul is one of the single most important stages in helping to rebuild the traumatized nation.As critical as repairing the decrepit electricity network, their deaths should lay to rest two of the ghouls haunting Iraqi citizens, and blocking their cooperation with the occupying forces. Iraqis have been terrorized by decades of Saddam's tyranny and remain terrified of the criminals and militias operating as saboteurs and guerrillas today. But the terror really lies within: the terror of Saddam's return. According to one group of Pentagon advisers, a...