Stories by Ron Moreau

  • Aftershocks In Kashmir

    If there's a bright spot in quake-ravaged Kashmir, Lt. Col. Chiragh Haider has glimpsed it. The Pakistani Army officer sent out a rescue team, looking for a squad of five soldiers who had been on sentry duty at the Line of Control that divides the disputed former kingdom. When the searchers reached the end of a ruined mountain road last week, they saw that a massive landslide had obliterated every trace of the soldiers and their hillside bunker. Nearby they crossed paths with a team of Indian soldiers on a similar mission, looking for several of their own men who had vanished in an avalanche of earth and rock just across the narrow valley.Scarcely three years ago the two nuclear-armed nations were on the verge of all-out war in Kashmir. But the search parties found themselves exchanging words of sympathy and good will. "Our side offered the Indians help, and they offered us help in finding the missing," says Haider. "Unfortunately the men are buried too deeply to do anything now."...
  • PAKISTAN: A 'SERIOUS' CRACKDOWN

    Has Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf seen the light? He's been criticized for his ambivalent stance on extremism in his country--especially after it was learned that one of the London suicide bombers may have spent time at Pakistani madrassas. Although Musharraf has vowed regularly to crack down on militant religious organizations, as well as madrassas that preach jihad, his government's follow-through has been weak. Indeed, one of the president's chief political allies has been the Muttahida Majlis-e-Amal, or MMA, an Islamist alliance of six religious parties that opposes Pakistan's cooperation with the United States in the war on terror, supports the Taliban, is sympathetic to Al Qaeda and objects to any government intervention in religious seminaries that promote radical Islamist ideology.During the October 2002 general elections, Musharraf aligned himself with the MMA and refused to allow the secular Pakistan People's Party and an opposition faction of the Pakistan Muslim...
  • A NEW KIND OF COMPANY

    A new kind of multinational corporation is emerging out of India, the hot newcomer in the global economy. It is the Tata Group, a family conglomerate that has gone professional without losing a distinct set of old-school values. Forged from both India's struggle for independence from Britain and the influence of early-20th-century Fabian socialists, Tata is a ferocious competitor with a very liberal touch. Consider: one of the largest of its 32 businesses, Tata Steel, has cut almost half its work force in the last 15 years to become the lowest-cost competitor in this brutal industry--yet has kept its promise to pay all laid-off workers full salary until retirement.In some ways, Tata could exist only in India, where wages of $1.20 an hour make cradle-to-grave corporate welfare far more affordable than it would be even in China. But Tata is unique even inside India, where its rigid ethical standards are so well known that corrupt officials typically don't even bother asking Tata...
  • FAMILY FEUDS: COLLIDING SONS

    Just because Tata Sons is thriving doesn't mean that Indian family conglomerates have a bright future. Indeed one key reason Tata works is that it's not really a family company. Chairman Ratan Tata has no children. The conglomerate has moved so firmly to professionalize its management ranks that the only other Tata with a high post is Noel, 47, a half-brother of Ratan who runs a retail business that is so low in the pecking order, he's not seen as a viable candidate for the top job.Meanwhile many of the other clan empires that once ruled Indian business have crumbled or are in disarray. The Bajaj family, who run a multibillion-dollar conglomerate with holdings from autos and auto finance to sugar and cement, is in internal negotiations to settle a dispute with a younger son who wants to break out on his own. The Ambanis just resolved a similar battle between brothers, when the matriarch of the clan put her elder son, Mukesh, 48, in charge of its main subsidiaries, two energy...
  • OF YOUTH AND GHOSTS

    Philip Jones Griffiths, who to my mind is Vietnam's pre-eminent photographer, rightly focuses many of the frames in his new book, "Vietnam at Peace," on the country's children. Vietnam is a very young nation indeed--70 percent of its population of more than 80 million was born after April 1975, when Hanoi defeated the U.S.-backed Saigon regime and unified the country, ending what the Vietnamese call the "American War." Not apparently scarred by the brutal, 15-year-long conflict, they look hopefully to the future. In one frame a smiling, bright-faced young schoolgirl, saluting during a class assembly, is an icon of optimism. Another school girl, with her student briefcase strapped to her back, poles a makeshift raft of wood and Styrofoam along a filthy canal to school, showing the drive that these youngsters have to build more prosperous lives.Building a modern Vietnam will be an uphill struggle--as hard, in its way, as the war. Griffiths, 69, who has brilliantly photographed the...
  • BOMBAY DREAMS

    Air travelers arriving in Mumbai can be forgiven if they suddenly get the urge to turn around and go elsewhere. At touchdown, the city's sprawling slums are literally a stone's throw from the plane's wingtips, and visitors are sometimes welcomed by the sight of locals relieving themselves on the hillside next to the airport. Outside the terminal, beggars besiege passengers as they wait for taxis.Things don't get much better on the 30-kilometer trip from the airport south to Mumbai's luxury hotels, a journey that takes a minimum of two agonizing hours at rush hour. The city's slums--where 60 percent of Mumbai's 15 million residents live--are everywhere: along the roadsides and railroad tracks, even atop the two-meter-diameter pipes that carry Mumbai's drinking water. The sea view along south Mumbai's Marine Drive is spectacular, but the area's aging but handsome seaside buildings appear untouched since independence from Britain. The city's infrastructure is crumbling. "The city is...
  • 'I DECIDED TO FIGHT BACK'

    Soon after Mukhtar Mai was savagely gang-raped on the orders of a village council three years ago, she considered her options. She had never been accused of any crime. (The rape was carried out as supposed retribution for an alleged and implausible affair between Mai's teenage brother and a 30-year-old woman.) But according to rural Pakistan's strict Islamic code, she was forever "dishonored." The local Mastoi clan, which dominates the village council, expected her to keep her mouth shut or simply disappear. Her own Gujar clan refused to support her. "My choice was either to commit suicide or to fight back," Mai recalled last week. "I decided to fight back."She's still fighting. Although an anti-terrorist court convicted and sentenced to death six of the 14 men initially charged with the rape in 2002, an appeals court overturned the sentences last month. Within days of that ruling, the Federal Sharia Court, which has unclear jurisdiction, nullified both verdicts. Then the Supreme...
  • Green Profits

    Two years ago, Indian corporate giant ITC set up a computer inside the modest, one-story brick house of wheat and soybean farmer Amar Singh Verma. Powered by rooftop solar panels and connected to the Internet by a satellite dish, the desktop links Verma and dozens of neighboring farmers to ITC-designed, Hindi-language Web pages that provide district-specific weather reports, the market price of soybeans and wheat and tips on modern growing methods. By following ITC's advice and using hybrid seeds, wider spacing between plants and better application of fertilizer, Verma dramatically increased his soybean yield on a two-and-a-half acre test plot by 50 percent last year. "It was like magic," says Verma, the largest and most successful farmer in Siradi village in the central Indian state of Madhya Pradesh. This season he plans to use the new practices to grow soybeans on his entire 25-acre farm. Other farmers are following suit.ITC is a $7.5 billion tobacco, food and hotel corporation-...
  • DOUBLE VISION

    It looked like a formula for disaster. Against all odds, Sonia Gandhi led her Congress party and its 15 coalition partners to victory in India's parliamentary elections last May. Hindu zealots in the defeated Bharatiya Janata Party responded by threatening massive protests against India's first "foreign born" prime minister. To quell the rancor, Gandhi (who is of Italian descent) arranged for her friend and adviser, the technocrat Manmohan Singh, to become prime minister. Yet Gandhi remained Congress party president and became chair of the ruling coalition.Not surprisingly, many Indians doubted the two-headed arrangement would survive. For most of its 57 years of independence, the world's largest democracy has been ruled by a lone charismatic leader. Whether Jawaharlal Nehru, Indira Gandhi or Sonia's late husband, Rajiv, these political leaders singlehandedly ran the government and party: convention-al wisdom held that the fractious country--a mosaic of competing languages,...
  • A CHANGE OF ADDRESS

    India's robust outsourcing industry grew up in the country's major cities--New Delhi, Mumbai and Bangalore, to name three. Prominent information-technology firms like Wipro, TCS and Infosys set up shop in those places, took advantage of smart but inexpensive technical talent, and flourished. In the mid- to late 1990s, Bangalore became one of the world's hottest IT centers. The city was clean, leafy, uncongested and offered financial incentives to businesses. Many firms grabbed them and turned the southern city into a symbol of India's low-cost tech prowess.But nearly a decade later, Bangalore's success is turning into a liability. The city's infrastructure is creaking; citizens face power shortages, maddening traffic jams and poor public transportation. The cost of living has soared. Other big cities are experiencing similar urban problems, including high real-estate prices and worker salaries that are rising by 10 to 15 percent annually.That's an alarming trend for an industry...
  • Drifting To The Right

    Uma Bharti, a militant leader of India's Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP), has always courted controversy. A self-styled sanyasin, or Hindu ascetic, she's been at the forefront of the Hindu nationalist BJP's most confrontational anti-Muslim maneuvers in recent years. In 1992, when Hindu fanatics destroyed a mosque that had allegedly been built on the birthplace of the Hindu god Ram, she helped to lead the charge dressed in her saffron robes. Two years later Bharti rallied Hindu extremists in an illegal protest over a piece of land in the southern state of Karnataka that was claimed by both Hindus and Muslims. Several people died in an ensuing riot, and Bharti was accused of attempted murder. Because of her high political profile, the charges were filed away.But late last month the Congress-party- led state government clumsily resurrected the accusations and asked the 45-year-old rabble-rouser to surrender to state authorities. The move seems to have re-energized the BJP, still reeling...
  • PAKISTAN: MIGHT MAKES RIGHT

    In the war on terror, few foreign leaders produce results like Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf. His security forces have arrested some of Al Qaeda's most-wanted leaders, including Osama bin Laden's operational whiz, Khalid Shaikh Mohammed. Since the September 11 attacks, Musharraf has turned over more than 500 terrorist suspects to the United States for questioning. And only last month, in joint operations with U.S. personnel, the Pakistanis nabbed a senior Tanzanian Qaeda operative, Ahmed Khalfan Ghailani, as well as Muhammed Neem Noor Khan, a Pakistani computer expert who had been running a--communications center for bin Laden's outfit in the eastern city of Lahore. For this and other antiterror successes, Musharraf has received nothing but admiration from American and other Western leaders. Wearing his favorite bemedaled commando's uniform, the president regularly meets in Islamabad with a parade of visiting European and U.S. officials who come to consult with and...
  • OPEN ARMS

    Mohammed Abbas and his brother, Mohammed Ibrahim, fled Kabul 19 years ago after Soviet forces occupied Afghanistan. They were among millions of Afghans who took refuge in neighboring Pakistan. In partnership with three other Afghans, they opened a small restaurant in Islamabad that soon became one of the most popular eating spots in the capital. "We have total freedom here," says Ibrahim. "We received tremendous support from Pakistanis." Like many successful Afghans, Ibrahim views Pakistan as his new home: "We have no intention of going back to Afghanistan."Over the past quarter century, Pakistan has played host to, and treated honorably, more refugees than any other country in the developing world. That's saying a lot for one of the world's poorest nations. Since the Soviets invaded Afghanistan in 1979, Pakistan has housed, fed and educated more than 5 million refugees, mainly Afghans, without isolating them and confining them to fetid, overcrowded camps. Rather, refugees have been...
  • More Miracles, Please

    Probably no human being could do what's being asked of Manmohan Singh. The 72-year-old economist, widely known as "Mr. Credibility," took over last week as India's new prime minister. Now he's faced with the problem that brought down his predecessor, Atal Bihari Vajpayee. As the man who ushered India's tech sector into the 21st century, Vajpayee worked a few wonders himself, like the 10.4 percent annualized growth rate the economy posted in the quarter just before the May elections. The trouble was, too many people had nothing to show for the country's successes. A third or more of India's 1.1 billion inhabitants subsist below the poverty line. Nearly 150 million live without water fit for bathing, never mind drinking. Barely half the adults have learned to read. And the government has nowhere near the money to make much difference.Singh didn't ask for this hopeless task. The mild-mannered former Finance minister, an adviser to practically every Indian government for the past three...
  • Ready For Prime Time?

    The week began with a meltdown. As Congress Party leader Sonia Gandhi--fresh from a surprise election victory that ousted Prime Minister Atal Bihari Vajpayee and his ruling Bharatiya Janata Party from power--worked to form a new coalition government, India's stock markets went into free fall. Congress's prospective communist allies, who garnered a record 62 seats in the recent polls, had begun spouting leftist-party dogma that sent panic through the private sector. The Mumbai Stock Exchange shed 11 percent of its value--its largest one-day plunge.Although regulators stepped in to halt trading, the market started to gain confidence only when a new rumor began to make the rounds: rather than take the post for herself, Gandhi was going to nominate Manmohan Singh as India's next prime minister. By midweek, when it was clear that the 72-year-old former Finance minister would indeed lead the new government, the markets had bounced back nearly to their pre-panic highs. "We know he'll take...
  • Royal Return

    Sonia Gandhi never harbored great expectations for this election. In 1999 the Italian-born leader of the Congress party, who had only reluctantly allowed herself to be dragged into politics the year before, had presided over her party's worst electoral defeat, in elections that brought Prime Minister Atal Bihari Vajpayee back to power. But by 10 a.m. last Thursday, only three hours after the vote count had begun, all signs suggested that this shy--some say reclusive--leader was about to lead Congress to its most dramatic political upset since independence in 1947. Huddled in front of the television with her staff at her New Delhi home as the poll returns rolled in, she was herself taken by surprise, sources said later. By noon Vajpayee and his Hindu-nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party had accepted defeat, and for the first time in 20 years, a member of the Nehru-Gandhi dynasty had led the party to victory. On Saturday Sonia's party elected her as its candidate for prime minister. "We...
  • AN INDIAN CHAMPION

    Indian Prime Minister Atal Behari Vajpayee is not the picture of health. The 79-year-old leader is overweight, has had both knees replaced and is physically feeble. With the help of two security guards he emerges with difficulty from his black BMW sedan and shuffles slowly, leaning from side-to-side, toward a speakers' stage. He climbs the dozen or so stairs hesitantly, his fingers tightly gripping the handrail. Just as he is about to sit down, a local politician presents him with a traditional, saffron-colored turban and a long sword--even though the senior statesman looks ready for anything but battle. When it is his turn to speak, two security guards help him rise from his chair and walk slowly to the podium.Vajpayee is, almost at once, a man transformed. His voice is deep, forceful and resonant. Now wearing the turban and wielding his blade, he quickly captivates an adoring crowd of several thousand supporters. They hang on his every word, and campaigning hard for a second five...
  • INTERVIEW: A LEADER RIDING HIGH

    Indian Prime Minister Atal Behari Vajpayee was all smiles as he sat down for an exclusive interview with NEWSWEEK's Sudip Mazumdar and Ron Moreau at his official residence in New Delhi late last week. His top aides had just informed him that India's GDP economic-growth rate in the last quarter was a whopping 10.4 percent and that India's cricket team was soundly beating Pakistan in their first test match in Multan. The 79-year-old Indian leader looked relaxed and confident as he talked about his plans for a second term. Excerpts:NEWSWEEK: Do you have a new vision for India?Vajpayee: I see India becoming a developed nation by 2020: economically strong, free of the problems of underdevelopment and playing a meaningful role in the world as befits a nation of more than 1 billion people. Our first priority is to speed up our economic-growth rate to 8 percent on a more sustainable basis. We will make India a service provider to the world, a major manufacturing hub and a center of the...
  • New Tales Of Graft And Greed

    Indians can be forgiven if they are suffering from corruption fatigue. Almost daily they seem to be bombarded with yet another official scandal. Despite her vociferous denials, the chief minister of Uttar Pradesh was forced to resign this summer amid allegations that she was accepting kickbacks from a real-estate developer, tucking the money away in her 87 personal bank accounts. Last month Dilip Singh Judeo, the ruling Bharatiya Janata Party's state minister for Environment and Forests, was caught on videotape accepting bundles of rupees in a posh New Delhi hotel room from a man claiming to represent an Australian mining company looking to secure mineral rights in two Indian states. And over the past few weeks what may amount to the country's largest scam has been slowly coming to light: a $5 billion nationwide forgery racket, allegedly run by a former south Indian village peanut vendor, which reportedly involved some of the nation's top cops and politicians.Official venality, of...
  • Walking A Fine Line

    Around 8 each morning, Afghan President Hamid Karzai emerges from his two-story residence within the sprawling grounds of Kabul's royal palace and walks to his presidential office, several hundred yards away. He is not alone. An American agent armed with a concealed pistol walks by his side; another is in front and another behind, both carrying M-4 automatic rifles. More than a dozen U.S. trained Afghan guards trot alongside, also heavily armed. U.S. and Afghan sharpshooters watch from the rooftops of nearby buildings as he passes. Karzai survived a hail of assassin's bullets last September, but neither that memory nor the blanket security seems to dampen his mood. He waves cheerily to palace staff and visitors, then ducks inside the granite-block presidential building, pockmarked by bullets from the long civil war, and bounds up a flight of stairs to his office. There, more American and Afghan agents stand at the ready.There are good reasons that Karzai is guarded like a national...
  • Stepping Away From Doomsday

    The peace gesture was as sudden as most declarations of war. Late last week India's prime minister, Atal Bihari Vajpayee, stunned Parliament with plans to send a new ambassador to Pakistan, resume air traffic and open peace talks with Islamabad. "The talks this time will be decisive," he promised. "I am confident I will succeed." Islamabad quickly confirmed the news. "Talks will begin very soon," said Pakistan's Information minister, Sheikh Rashid Ahmed. "Things are moving very fast."The two nuclear-armed neighbors have been perilously close to all-out war since the end of 2001, when five terrorists were killed trying to seize New Delhi's Parliament building. India blamed separatist guerrillas supported by Pakistan in the disputed territory of Kashmir. Both countries withdrew their ambassadors and traded tit-for-tat ballistic-missile tests, as well as artillery fire and mortar barrages.This April, Vajpayee visited the Kashmiri city of Srinagar, where he made the first public speech...
  • Reining In The Warlords

    Afghan warlord Ismail Khan, the governor of Herat province, tries his best to sound like a loyal subordinate. When asked if he submits to President Hamid Karzai's authority, Khan laughs and points to a portrait of the president hanging on the wall behind his desk. "If I didn't respect him and his authority I wouldn't have his picture hanging up there." But posters plastered on shop windows around Herat City come closer to the truth: they feature a large, imposing portrait of Khan with a smaller image of Karzai tucked away in the background.Indeed, Khan, the self-styled "Emir of the Southwest," pays little more than lip service to Karzai and Kabul. With a military--force some 25,000 strong, Khan keeps a tight grip on the trade routes from Iran and Turkmenistan. Last year his control of this border trade netted him an estimated $100 million to $300 million in customs revenue alone. With that kind of money, Afghanistan's warlords need not answer to anyone, least of all Karzai. They run...
  • Pakistan: A Growing 'Talibanization'

    For 40 years, Shaukat Khan has made a modest income singing and dancing to traditional Pashtun music at weddings and family celebrations. Now the 50-year-old performer, along with hundreds of other musicians, is being run out of show business in Pakistan's North-West Frontier province. They are among the first casualties of the aggressive "anti-obscenity" crackdown being orchestrated by the Islamist United Action Council, or MMA in its Urdu-language acronym. "The mullahs hate us," says Khan, sighing. "They only want us to study the holy Qur'an."The MMA rode to victory in October's NWFP provincial election on the strength of a campaign that was virulently anti-American and that promised to uphold Islamic values. Like the stridently religious Hindu nationalists in neighboring India, the pro-Taliban coalition of six conservative parties says it is doing exactly what the voters asked it to do. "People elected us to destroy culture that is alien to Islamic values," says Bakht Jan, the...
  • A New Game

    President Pervez Musharraf thought he had the election all sewn up. His powerful Inter-Services Intelligence agency, or ISI, assured him that Pakistan's Oct. 10 race would produce what he wanted: a friendly Parliament filled with "new faces." And he had no reason to doubt his spooks. His political operatives had already organized a pro-military breakaway faction of former prime minister Nawaz Sharif's Pakistan Muslim League, called the PML-Q, as the president's political vehicle. Over the summer his advisers crafted a slew of laws and constitutional amendments that barred charismatic former prime ministers Benazir Bhutto and Sharif from the contest. And Musharraf's camp made one other pre-election gambit: it allowed the candidates of a coalition of six right-wing religious parties, called the United Action Council, or MMA in its Urdu-language acronym, to campaign freely on their virulently anti-American platform long before other parties entered the contest. The mullahs had won only...
  • A Big Vote For Jihad

    The Islamist leader could scarcely contain his glee. "This is a revolution!" crowed Qazi Hussain Ahmed, promising to evict not only U.S. troops but every trace of Western culture from Pakistan's soil. No one, not even Qazi himself, had expected the pro-Taliban candidates of his United Action Council (also known by its Urdu-language initials, MMA) to show such power at the polls. The coalition's six parties had always clung to the rag-ged fringe of Pakistani politics: the last time National Assembly elections were held, in 1997, they won only two seats. But when last week's ballots were in, the mullahs had captured at least 51 out of 342 seats--and at least an outside chance of helping form Pakistan's new government. What's more, they seem eager and able to disrupt the cooperation of Pakistan's military ruler, Gen. Pervez Musharraf, in the war on terror.The MMA ran on a venomously anti-U.S. and anti-Musharraf platform--a message warmly received in the tribal areas near the Afghan...
  • Power And Privilege

    A score of Pakistani peasants, dressed in shalwar kameez and turbans, stood nervously before a table piled high with land contracts. They had come to the sprawling Military Farms--a 17,000-acre dairy, meat and grain-producing agribusiness in the heart of the fertile Punjab--at the urging of its owner, the Pakistani Army. According to Army Col. Saleem Khan, the commander of a paramilitary unit assigned to the area, the tenant farmers were voluntarily signing new land-tenure contracts. After two years of resistance, he claimed, a majority of the 15,000 tenant families who'd been working the land had agreed to the military's new terms. As proof, he pointed to several "signed" contracts on the table marked by a farmer's thumbprint in purple ink. (Most of the farmers are illiterate.)But when retired Adm. Fasih Bokhari--who personally visited Military Farms to investigate charges of Army coercion--asked the peasants if they were signing willingly, almost all of them demurred. "We are...
  • Failed Cities: Terror's Urban Jungle

    The tragedy of 9-11 brought home the danger posed by failing states like Afghanistan and Pakistan, where poverty, chaos and corruption formed petri dishes for would-be radicals. Now Pakistan's largest city and commercial capital--the sprawling port of Karachi, teeming with 14 million people--is highlighting the danger posed by failing cities, where the same combination of factors may prove even more destabilizing.Since their Taliban allies were ousted in Afghanistan, Qaeda terrorists have infiltrated Karachi, making the city--already known for ethnic, sectarian and political violence--one of the epicenters of the war on terror. At Karachi International Airport, banks of video cameras now watch every arriving and departing passenger. The cameras and new immigration computers are both linked to the U.S. FBI, so that American agents can quickly check faces and names against lists of wanted terrorists. Pakistani Army Rangers, dressed in flak jackets and carrying automatic weapons, guard...
  • Tailoring Democracy

    In Pakistan, politics is often a family affair. This week's parliamentary election called by Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf is no different. ...
  • Pakistan: Christians Under Fire

    Since the start of U.S. military actions in Afghanistan last October, terrorists in Muslim Pakistan have attacked three Christian churches and a school with automatic weapons and hand grenades, killing more than 30 people and wounding more than 50. Increasingly, Pakistani Christians fear that these Islamic extremists, who are bent on settling scores with America for its war against the Taliban and Al Qaeda, will target them, now that Western diplomatic missions have hardened their defenses against attacks. "[The extremists] say, 'Americans are Christian, the West is Christian, so let's kill Christians here in retaliation'," says Shahbaz Bhatti, head of the All Pakistan Minorities Alliance.Pakistan's President Pervez Musharraf has denounced the attacks in recent weeks, and Pakistani security forces boasted that they'd arrested 12 militants who belong to outlawed extremist groups. The government is also making it easier for Christian communities to get firearms licenses. Still,...
  • Her Eye On The Prize

    Former Pakistani Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto has been knocked down many times. Dictator Mohammad Zia ul-Haq hanged her father in 1979 and imprisoned her after her return from exile in 1986. She has been elected prime minister twice and twice been pushed out by the military. For the past six years her husband has sat in a Pakistani jail for corruption charges he denies. Avoiding similar charges, Bhutto has lived in exile--dividing her time between London and Dubai--since 1997. Now Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf is dead-set on blocking her return to power. He recently issued a package of executive orders and constitutional amendments largely aimed at preventing her from becoming prime minister for a third time. But Bhutto, 49, is still on her feet. She's vowing to make a political comeback despite the long odds. "I am returning home to contest the October elections," she told NEWSWEEK recently. "No one can stop me."Bhutto can't be written off. She is a talented, hands-on...