Sean Smith

Stories by Sean Smith

  • peace-sc30-hsmall

    Goodbye, Hollywood. Hello, Peace Corps!

    Angelina Jolie is to blame, really. Because of something she said to me in India four years ago, I have quit my 13-year career as an entertainment journalist, have given away almost everything I own, and at 43, have joined the Peace Corps.
  • Talk Transcript: Sean Smith on Angelina Jolie

    Perhaps it wasn't the best idea to dress actors in Pakistani police uniforms, hand them AK-47s and stand them in the dirt courtyard of a Muslim school in India while children were in class. Still, that gaffe would have been fast forgotten if the film being shot on campus, "A Mighty Heart," weren't about the murder of Jewish American journalist Daniel Pearl by Muslim extremists—and weren't starring Angelina Jolie. When parents showed up that Nov. 16 afternoon to pick up their kids, the gates were closed to keep out the paparazzi who had surrounded the school, their telephoto lenses aimed like rifle scopes. The parents became anxious, so the school opened the gates, and the paparazzi flooded in with them. The film's security guards tried to hold back the crowd. A scuffle ensued. No one was injured. But the following morning, two of Jolie's bodyguards were arrested for intimidation. Unnamed sources in local newspapers claimed that the white British guards had shoved parents and kids...
  • Talk Transcript: Sean Smith on Angelina Jolie

    "A Mighty Heart," starring Angelina Jolie, is based on the best-selling book by Mariane Pearl about the murder of her husband, Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl, by Al Qaeda members in Karachi, Pakistan, in early 2002. The movie details Mariane's struggle—with the help of Journal editors, Pakistan counterterrorism experts, FBI agents and others—to unravel the terrorist network and find Danny. Much in Mariane's life has changed since then, including the birth of their son, Adam, who is now 5 years old. The film opens June 22. Pearl spoke to NEWSWEEK's Sean Smith from her home in Paris about the film, her friendship with Jolie, the politics of terror, and the true meaning of revenge. Excerpts: ...
  • Homer Simpson's Big-Screen Odyssey

    To make it on the big screen, you have to give people something spectacular. Something extraordinary. Something like Bart Simpson—full frontal. It happens early in "The Simpsons Movie," when the animated 10-year-old takes a dare from his goofball father, Homer, to skateboard naked through the streets of Springfield. Hidden by plants and picket fences, he whizzes along, past kids, down hills, through traffic lights, until, in one shocking moment, little Bart flashes his little part to the entire world. Which may make this the first Hollywood film to show that kind of skin and to escape an R rating.In a summer bursting with comedies—including major animated fare "Shrek the Third" and the new Pixar film, "Ratatouille"—"The Simpsons Movie," which opens July 27, is both the least hyped and the most anticipated. Since "The Simpsons" debuted in 1989, it has built a fanatical fan base, earned 23 Emmys and generated more than $2.5 billion in revenue, if you include the never-ending selection...
  • Homer Simpson's Big-Screen Odyssey

    To make it on the big screen, you have to give people something spectacular. Something extraordinary. Something like Bart Simpson—full frontal. It happens early in "The Simpsons Movie," when the animated 10-year-old takes a dare from his goofball father, Homer, to skateboard naked through the streets of Springfield. Hidden by plants and picket fences, he whizzes along, past kids, down hills, through traffic lights, until, in one shocking moment, little Bart flashes his little part to the entire world. Which may make this the first Hollywood film to show that kind of skin and to escape an R rating.In a summer bursting with comedies—including major animated fare "Shrek the Third" and the new Pixar film, "Ratatouille"—"The Simpsons Movie," which opens July 27, is both the least hyped and the most anticipated. Since "The Simpsons" debuted in 1989, it has built a fanatical fan base, earned 23 Emmys and generated more than $2.5 billion in revenue, if you include the never-ending selection...
  • Will Smith: Hollywood's most powerful actor?

    A few decades ago, paleontologist Stephen Jay Gould developed the theory of punctuated equilibrium, which states, in essence, that evolution doesn't happen at a slow, steady rate. It happens fast, in bursts, after long periods of stasis. Maybe he should be required reading in Hollywood.For almost as long as there have been power lists, Tom Hanks and Tom Cruise—"The Toms"—have jockeyed for first position, occasionally letting Mel Gibson sneak up on the rail, just to keep things interesting. But just like that, the race has changed. Gibson hasn't starred in a major film in five years. Cruise lost his cool on Oprah's couch, and it's unclear if he can get it back. And Hanks, while undeniably bankable, is, at 50, no longer viable for most leading-man scripts. In the past year, all three men have been eclipsed. With a worldwide career box office of $4.4 billion, Will Smith is now the most powerful actor in Hollywood, followed by Johnny Depp and Ben Stiller. Talk about punctuated (or maybe...
  • Will Smith: Hollywood's most powerful actor?

    A few decades ago, paleontologist Stephen Jay Gould developed the theory of punctuated equilibrium, which states, in essence, that evolution doesn't happen at a slow, steady rate. It happens fast, in bursts, after long periods of stasis. Maybe he should be required reading in Hollywood.For almost as long as there have been power lists, Tom Hanks and Tom Cruise—"The Toms"—have jockeyed for first position, occasionally letting Mel Gibson sneak up on the rail, just to keep things interesting. But just like that, the race has changed. Gibson hasn't starred in a major film in five years. Cruise lost his cool on Oprah's couch, and it's unclear if he can get it back. And Hanks, while undeniably bankable, is, at 50, no longer viable for most leading-man scripts. In the past year, all three men have been eclipsed. With a worldwide career box office of $4.4 billion, Will Smith is now the most powerful actor in Hollywood, followed by Johnny Depp and Ben Stiller. Talk about punctuated (or maybe...
  • Now, Watch Very Carefully

    Even obsessive "Harry Potter" fans don't seem to have noticed that Hogwarts has had a makeover from the first two films. "As you approach, the Great Hall and the tower housing Professor Dumbledore's office are off to the left, and there's a viaduct connecting them to a series of buildings on the right," says Oscar-winning art director Stuart Craig, who has designed all five "Potter" movies, including this summer's "Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix." "If you look to the right of that viaduct, there are considerable changes there": a whole new set of towers and spires. "Sometimes it was done to improve a particular shot, but sometimes it was just because I was anxious to improve the silhouette," he says. "Nobody's objected so far, and hopefully they won't." Craig has made lots of alterations to Harry's world over the past six years. He agreed to share a few of them in an exclusive NEWSWEEK interview:* Hagrid's house was an octagonal one-room hut in the first film, but Craig...
  • Hollywood Royalty

    Security was tight. For the first time, NEWSWEEK'S annual roundtable was held in public, at the Egyptian Theater in Hollywood. We made sure to keep a few of the celebrities' names secret, and arranged for all of them to arrive via an inconspicuous side entrance to the theater. So imagine our surprise when Brad Pitt--the most paparazzi-hounded star on the planet--was dropped off on Hollywood Boulevard and strode blithely through the theater's front doors, disguised only by a pair of sunglasses. Onstage, Pitt was joined by five other remarkable actors of 2006: Cate Blanchett, Forest Whitaker, Helen Mirren, Penelope Cruz and Leonardo DiCaprio. Needless to say, the audience was buzzing. But so were the stars, who listened with obvious delight as their fellow actors discussed their lives, their craft, their passions and their fears. Pitt teased DiCaprio, who said he didn't appreciate being seen as "a piece of cute meat" after "Titanic." "That you are ," Pitt told him. Blanchett, who...
  • James Cameron Back in Action

    It has been 10 years since "Titanic" grossed $1.8 billion worldwide and earned a record 11 Oscars. Writer-Director James Cameron hasn't made a feature film since. Last week, he announced that he will begin shooting "Avatar," a $195 million action-adventure film set on a distant planet, shot in digital 3-D, using a camera he developed. He spoke with NEWSWEEK's Sean Smith.NEWSWEEK: Why has it taken so long for you to direct another feature film?James Cameron: Well, there's not a quick answer. I've done 70 ocean expeditions in the last 10 years, and I love that world. I've been living out a kind of childhood dream of doing real exploration. But I always knew that I would come back to feature filmmaking. We're announcing "Avatar" right now, but I've been working on it for a year and half.A year and a half?! I can't believe you kept that quiet.[ Laughs ] I can't either. We've got, like, a hundred people working it full time. But they're pretty dedicated. They believe in this thing. It's...
  • Steven Spielberg and Mark Burnett

    The most-anticipated new reality show of next year was conceived in Steven Spielberg's backyard. In early 2006, the Oscar-winning director was at his Los Angeles home chatting with Mark Burnett, the creator of "Survivor" and "The Apprentice." The topic was not television, but a movie they'd like to make together. The movie remains a secret, but "in the course of talking about the film, I mentioned that I was interested in sweeping the world to find new actors and directors," Spielberg recalls, standing next to his black luxury golf cart on the Universal lot. "I said, 'You know, it could also be a reality show'." Why yes, Steven, it could. A week later Burnett was back with a pitch for "On the Lot," a Fox reality series that pits 16 young film directors against each other for a shot at a $1 million development deal with Spielberg's studio, DreamWorks. "It's a fairly simple concept," Burnett says. "Most good things are fairly simple.""Lot" breaks the contestants into four teams, which...
  • Rocky's Final Round

    Boy, did I get a beating," says Sylvester Stallone, sitting in the living room of his Italian-style villa high above Beverly Hills. A year ago the 60-year-old actor was in the ring being pummeled by a 37-year-old professional boxer for the climactic scene of "Rocky Balboa," the sixth and final installment of the franchise that launched Stallone's career. That kind of hammering can't be healthy. "The second knockdown in that scene was real. It doesn't hurt so much as it stuns you. You're lying facedown, going, 'I'm fine. Just let me stand here a minute'." He laughs. "I had to spend a couple of nights in a hyperbaric chamber to get oxygen back in me. It helps repair injuries quicker, but it kind of felt like Poe's 'Premature Burial'." He knows a thing or two about that.If you've been in a theater when the trailer for "Rocky Balboa" plays, you've probably witnessed--or participated in--the rather unkind response: laughter, mixed with a few cheers. When Stallone announced he was doing...
  • Movies: Who's That Guy With Harry Potter?

    Mention the name of the new "Harry Potter" director and the near-universal response is, "Who?" After creating a $3.5 billion franchise with a string of high-profile filmmakers--Chris Columbus, Alfonso Cuarón and Mike Newell--Warner Bros. hired David Yates to take the reins for "Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix," which will be released next summer. Yates is unknown here, but he's been building an impressive résumé in his native Britain. His movie "Sex Traffic," about women forced into international prostitution, was widely praised. In 2004 he won a British Directors' Guild award for the TV series "State of Play," a political thriller. And his last film, HBO's "The Girl in the Café," is a romance set at the G8 economic summit (yes, really), and earned an Emmy this year. "He's one of the most exciting directors coming out of this country at the moment," says longtime "Potter" producer David Heyman. Fair enough. But what's a guy who makes gritty, hyperreal socially conscious...
  • Living the Dream

    When Oprah Winfrey phoned the hotel room, Jennifer Hudson refused to take the call. "Tell her I'm not talking," Hudson told her makeup artist, who had answered the phone. Relaying this story a week later, Hudson laughs. "I was resting my voice, and I thought it was my manager playing around!" she says. "It took about 30 seconds before I realized, 'Oh, my God, this is Oprah for real!' " Winfrey had just seen Hudson's debut in "Dreamgirls," the film adaptation of the Tony- winning Broadway musical about the rise of a 1960s girls singing group. Hudson plays Effie White, a big woman with a big attitude and an even bigger voice. The movie stars Beyoncé Knowles, Eddie Murphy and Jamie Foxx, but Effie is its soul, and Hudson more than delivers. She dazzles. Winfrey was calling to tell her so. "She said my performance was like a religious experience," Hudson says, and looks down at her lap. "She said words were not enough to define it. She said, 'I'm so proud of you'.""Dreamgirls" is a...
  • Living the Dream

    When Oprah Winfrey phoned the hotel room, Jennifer Hudson refused to take the call. "Tell her I'm not talking," Hudson told her makeup artist, who had answered the phone. Relaying this story a week later, Hudson laughs. "I was resting my voice, and I thought it was my manager playing around!" she says. "It took about 30 seconds before I realized, 'Oh, my God, this is Oprah for real!' " Winfrey had just seen Hudson's debut in "Dreamgirls," the film adaptation of the Tony- winning Broadway musical about the rise of a 1960s girls singing group. Hudson plays Effie White, a big woman with a big attitude and an even bigger voice. The movie stars Beyoncé Knowles, Eddie Murphy and Jamie Foxx, but Effie is its soul, and Hudson more than delivers. She dazzles. Winfrey was calling to tell her so. "She said my performance was like a religious experience," Hudson says, and looks down at her lap. "She said words were not enough to define it. She said, 'I'm so proud of you'.""Dreamgirls" is a...
  • Holy Hollywood

    “The Nativity Story,” a new movie that tells the narrative of the birth of Jesus Christ, won’t be in theaters until December, but Anne Graham Lotz has already seen it. Lotz, who is Billy Graham’s daughter, was one of the dozens of pastors, religious scholars and historians who were consulted on the script. Still, she says, she was nervous when the studio, New Line, brought the film to North Carolina to screen it for her. “I’d never really had any communication with Hollywood before this, and my impression is that Hollywood doesn’t quite get it when it comes to Christians,” she says. “So I was very concerned about showing the movie to people before I’d seen it. I just didn’t know what the finished product would be.” As the final credits rolled and the lights came up, she had her answer. “I’m not an emotional person,” she says, “but when I finished watching it I … it was just overwhelming to me, the tenderness and beauty of it. The tears came down my cheeks. I couldn’t speak.”Almost...
  • Stars: Revealing the Whole Harry Potter

    Before you see Harry Potter on screen next summer, you'll be able to see him naked onstage in London. Daniel Radcliffe, 17-year-old star of the "Potter" franchise, will make his West End debut next year in the Tony-winning drama "Equus." The role--a troubled young man with a religious-erotic obsession with horses--requires Radcliffe to be nude for one scene. What was he thinking? "Part of me wants to shake up people's perception of me, just shove me in a blender," Radcliffe told NEWSWEEK in an exclusive interview on the set of the fifth film, "Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix." "It's a really challenging play, and if I can pull it off--we don't know if I can yet--I hope people will stop and think, 'Maybe he can do something other than Harry'."Not that Harry's been bad to him. The films have grossed more than $3.5 billion worldwide and made Radcliffe a rich teen. Still, you can't blame a young actor for wanting to reveal another part of himself, so to speak. What's...
  • Being Bening

    Annette Bening is a picture of poise and reserve. She's warm, yes, but not one to use an interview as therapy. She'll chat forever about the brilliance of Maggie Smith or Frances McDormand, ask about the state of the media or discuss a novel, but questions about, say, why she's drawn to certain characters elicit polite deflections. So it's a shock when Ryan Murphy, the director of "Running With Scissors," announces, "Annette is really dishy, which nobody knows. She's hilarious. When I met with her to discuss this movie, one of the first things she said to me was 'The most important thing we can do on this movie is get the wigs right. If the wigs are wrong, we're f---ed '."They got the wigs right, and Bening took care of the rest. She has been nominated for three Oscars--for best supporting actress in "The Grifters," and for best actress in "American Beauty" and "Being Julia." This year she's almost certain to get another shot at the gold for her performance as a narcissistic,...
  • Ask Tip Sheet

    When a Hollywood star is said to make $20 million a picture, how much does he actually get to keep?--Pam Lackey, Albuquerque, N.M.Of an actor's $20 million salary, 10 percent goes to his agent. His business manager and lawyer each get 5 percent. About $7 million goes to taxes, unless the money is diverted into tax shelters. So, in general, from a $20 million salary, the star takes home only about $9 million. Some actors have a career manager--separate from the business manager--who lops off another 10 percent, leaving a net income of $7 million. Which is still enough to pay the plastic surgeon.--Sean Smith
  • Exclusive: Harry Potter and the Wavering Costar

    Harry Potter" might lose one of its stars. The fifth film in the series, "Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix," is currently filming at Leavesden Studios north of London. Negotiations to lock in Daniel Radcliffe (Harry Potter), Rupert Grint (Ron Weasley) and Emma Watson (Hermione Granger) for the final two films are in the preliminary stages, and while the boys are likely to commit, Watson, 16, is unsure. "I don't know yet," she told NEWSWEEK near the set of 12 Grimmauld Place, secret headquarters of the Order of the Phoenix. "Every film is such a huge production, and it's a long time." Saying yes would mean she'd be playing the studious Hermione until she's 20. Watson scored near- perfect grades on her national exams. College must be on her mind, not to mention a career, and she's not sure acting is in the cards. "Daniel and Rupert seem so sure," she says, and looks sincerely plagued that she isn't. "I love to perform, but there are so many things I love doing." Pause. "Maybe...
  • Newsmakers

    Mel Gibson had a miserable week. Arrested early on July 28 for driving drunk--he was doing more than 85mph in a 45mph zone in Malibu, Calif., with an open bottle of tequila in the car--the star ranted to police, "F---ing Jews . . . Jews are responsible for all the wars in the world." The Web site TMZ.com broke the news, and it created a media maelstrom. Gibson had been accused of--and had denied--anti-Semitism in his 2004 film "The Passion of the Christ," and his father, Hutton, has been widely characterized as a Holocaust denier. For many, Gibson's outburst proved what they had long suspected. By midweek, Gibson, an alcoholic who had been in recovery since the early '90s, had begun an unspecified treatment (his publicist says he "is not just being treated at home, but he hasn't checked in to a full-time facility, either") and issued two apologies. The second read, in part: "I am asking the Jewish community, whom I have personally offended, to help me on my journey through recovery....
  • The Mice That Roared

    They weren't exactly Hollywood's idea of a power couple: Disney CEO Robert Iger, once derided as a "suit," and stu-dio chief Richard Cook, who got his start as a monorail operator at Disneyland. But last week Iger and Cook dropped a bomb bigger than any of the explosions you'll see in "Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest." Just weeks after the record-smashing release of the sequel--soon to be the highest-grossing film in Disney history--Cook fired studio president Nina Jacobson and announced Disney was slashing 20 percent of its studio staff and cutting the number of films it makes each year by a third.As usual, Hollywood thought it was all about them. "People are concerned that if Disney is cutting back on live-action movies, then what are other companies going to do," says Jim Wiatt, chief executive of the William Morris Agency. The unflappable Iger's response: "We're focused on our own issues and strategies. If it has an effect on the industry, so be it. But it really is...
  • Career Intervention: M. Night Shyamalan

    The Crisis:notSince that article four years ago, Shyamalan's movies--namely "The Village" and "Lady in the Water"--have certainly become more artificial and less engrossing. The success of "The Sixth Sense" gave him total creative autonomy, and he has isolated himself in Pennsylvania, where all his movies are made. "When someone is given total artistic freedom," says one blockbuster producer, "the result is usually bad."The Cure: No one doubts his talent, or believes he has done irreparable harm to his career. What remains to be seen, though, is how he will react if "Lady in the Water" fails. "Will he be one of those guys who self-destructs," asks an Oscar-nominated producer, "or will he pick himself up and reinvent himself?" The solution, most suggest, is for him to break out of his self-imposed cocoon. "The smaller you make your world, the less of an artist you can really be," says an indie exec. "Look at Stanley Kubrick. If you see 'Eyes Wide Shut,' it's clear he hadn't left the...
  • A Flying Leap

    two years ago Bryan Singer walked away from the "X-Men" franchise he had created to direct "Superman Returns." Good call. Early reviews, including NEWSWEEK's, have been raves. As the film begins, Superman (Brandon Routh) has returned from a five-year search for Krypton to discover that Lois Lane (Kate Bosworth) has a 5-year-old son, a devoted boyfriend (James Marsden) and a Pulitzer Prize for writing the column "Why the World Doesn't Need Superman." Lex Luthor (Kevin Spacey), meanwhile, is hatching a plan for global destruction.In casual conversation, Singer can be charming, hilarious company. During interviews, however, he can be twitchy and guarded, like a man who's just been read his Miranda rights. Over lunch in the Warner Bros. commissary last week, the director, 40, was exhausted but cheerful and talkative on most, if not all, subjects. ...
  • A Pirate's Life

    He wasn't looking for superstardom, so superstardom came looking for him. Johnny Depp on family, 'Pirates of the Caribbean 2'--and how he got a chest of gold without selling his soul.
  • The Girl Can't Help It

    Celeb-baiting comedian Kathy Griffin, whose show 'My Life on the D-List' returns this month, has a foul mouth and a bad attitude. And it's made her a star.
  • Mission: Impossible III: Who's Smiling Now?

    Hollywood celebrated the lackluster opening of "Mission: Impossible III" by dancing on Tom Cruise's grave. "There's a certain part of this town that loves to watch somebody self-destruct," said one film-industry exec, who, like others in the business, makes it a policy not to criticize anyone publicly. "People were rooting against that movie. They were rooting against Tom." Rooting against him so much that they may have overhyped his demise. Cruise has been the closest thing to a sure thing in Hollywood for almost two decades, and the $48 million opening weekend gross for "M:i:III" ($10 million below the opening for "M:i:II"), while disappointing, hardly qualifies as a flop.But does it mean Cruise's star is starting to fall? And if so, are his Scientology-promoting, Katie Holmes-gushing, couch-jumping antics of the past year to blame? "That's the easiest thing to say, but I don't think it's all because Tom Cruise is a nut job," says one seasoned Hollywood veteran. It may be simply...
  • 'DA VINCI': Tom, Hollywood Hates Da Hair

    Nothing is going to stop the movie of "The Da Vinci Code" from being an unqualified success--except maybe Tom Hanks's terrible hairdo. Sounds silly, right? But Hollywood, like high school, is a silly place, and folks never pass up a chance to play their favorite parlor game: trying to put a dent in a rival movie's prospects by quietly trashing it. For "Da Vinci," they've zeroed in on the flowing mane of hair that Hanks, 49, chose for his role in Ron Howard's screen adaptation. "In Hollywood, it's not enough that I win. You have to lose," says one studio executive who didn't want be identified discussing a competitor's project. "People are really trying to sabotage each other. It's not a sport anymore. It's a science." (Of course, when asked about Hanks's hair, this source didn't blink: "I loathe it. It looks greasy.") Columbia, the studio releasing "Da Vinci," declined to comment, but in a NEWSWEEK interview last winter, Hanks was jocular on the subject: "Let's just say I got...
  • A Dark Day Revisited

    If movie trailers are supposed to cause a reaction, the preview for "United 93" more than succeeds. Featuring no voice-over and no famous actors, it begins with images of a beautiful morning and passengers boarding an airplane. It takes you a minute to realize what the movie's even about. That's when a plane hits the World Trade Center. The effect is visceral. When the trailer played before "Inside Man" last week at the famed Grauman's Chinese Theatre in Hollywood, audience members began calling out, "Too soon!" In New York City, where 9/11 remains an open wound, the response was even more dramatic. The AMC Loews theater on Manhattan's Upper West Side took the rare step of pulling the trailer from its screens after several complaints. "One lady was crying," says one of the theater's managers, Kevin Adjodha. "She was saying we shouldn't have [played the trailer]. That this was wrong ... I don't think people are ready for this."We're about to find out. "United 93" is the first feature...
  • A Dash of Fresh 'Pepper'

    Actors can be fans, too, and they're not above lifting a memento--a prop, a costume--from the set once filming is over. When she finished her third "X-Men" movie, Rebecca Romijn walked off with an unusual keepsake: a bottle of blue paint. Technically, it's called Mystique blue, because it's the color of her scaly character, Mystique. Even stranger, Romijn still uses the stuff. You can see it in her new WB comedy, "Pepper Dennis," in which she plays a hard-charging, ridiculously glam TV reporter. In one episode, Pepper arrives at the scene of a bank robbery and interviews the security guard about the exploding dye packs hidden to catch a thief. She reaches for a stack of bills on the ground when the guard stops her. "The bomb inside that puppy has not detonated," he says, which of course means in 15 seconds--boom. Pepper is splattered with Mystique blue. "It was such a nice little cathartic wink-wink, you know?" says Romijn. "And the shot of my feet in the shower with the blue paint...
  • Sharon Stone Strikes Again

    If you think Sharon Stone's movies have been revealing over the years, you should check out her lawsuits. In June 2001, the actress sued the producers of "Basic Instinct 2: Risk Addiction" for $100 million because they had failed to make the movie and (more to the point) failed to pay her. During her deposition, Stone, now 48, said she'd initially been wary of appearing nude again. "I put up 'Basic Instinct' in my projection room in L.A., put up the naked scene, froze it, took off my clothes," she said. "I had my best friend come over, stood in front of it and she said, 'You look fabulous, you're ready to go.' And I felt great."It's been 14 years since "Basic Instinct" riveted the world with its unabashed voyeurism, its lethal bisexuals and its ice pick. It became the must-see movie of 1992, igniting the rage of gay and lesbian groups--and the fantasies of straight men--and grossing $353 million worldwide. The movie rescued Stone from a career of forgettable babe roles, and turned...

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