Steve Tuttle

Stories by Steve Tuttle

  • Fewer Americans Are Hunting and Fishing

    If you’re a squirrel or a trout, we’ve got some good news for you: Americans are hunting and fishing less. Every five years, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service puts together a massive survey of outdoor recreation, and the 2006 preliminary numbers were released today. They show ominous trends, depending on your worldview—or species. The number of anglers has dropped 12 percent since 2001; the hunter count has fallen off by 4 percent during the same five-year period. This doesn’t mean Americans aren’t spending time outdoors or interacting with wild animals; “wildlife watching” is up 8 percent since 2001. They’re just choosing not to kill them so much.Though the final report won’t be available until November of this year, the preliminary findings reveal a downward pattern that worries many sportsmen: over the last 15 years or so, millions fewer people have been hunting and fishing in a country with a rapidly expanding population. There are countless reasons for the trend, chief among...
  • Aloha, President Obama. Do You Have a Hall Pass?

    What do actress Kelly Preston, teen golf phenom Michelle Wie, AOL founder Steve Case and Senator Barack Obama have in common? They all attended the Punahou School in Honolulu, Hawaii. Founded in 1841 to educate the kids of missionaries, Punahou is one of the largest private schools in the United States, with 3,750 coed students, kindergarten through 12th grade. Other famous alums include two members of the Kingston Trio, eBay founder Pierre Omidyar, professional football and baseball players, artists, Broadway producers and a whopping 28 Olympians, including Buster Crabbe. What can account for such a spectacular pool of graduates? Maybe there's something in the water. "Ka Punahou" means "new spring" in Hawaiian.
  • The Elusive Hunter

    It's a way of life that dates to the dawn of the nation. But hunting is on the wane in America. A sportsman's lament.
  • Vietnam: Adding to the Wall

    NEWSWEEK got an early look at plans for the recently approved Vietnam Veterans Memorial Center in D.C. Among the details: after entering the underground museum through a tunnel, visitors will see a huge video wall with larger-than-life photos of the men and women who died in Vietnam, set to fade in and out on their birthdays. From Army boots to baseball gloves to unopened packages addressed to dead soldiers, evocative artifacts from among the 85,000 left at the wall over the years will be displayed on a rotating basis. There will be a bookstore and library, but no movie theater--nor simulated paddy fields, as rumored. Disney consultants have been hired to study crowd flow at the museum, which isexpected to handle 350 at a time. Jan Scruggs, the decorated Vietnam vet who was the force behind the memorial and the museum, disagrees with critics who say the wall should stand alone. "Forty percent of the people who visit the wall are younger than the memorial itself, much less old enough...
  • 'He Lost Control of His Emotions'

    Like Dick Cheney, veteran hunter John Freck knows the feeling of raising a shotgun to a covey of quail. "You get a huge adrenaline rush when the birds flush," says Freck, who regularly pursues quail with his German shorthaired pointer, Gunnar. That rush is one of the reasons hunters love the sport. But it's also the cause of accidents. No matter what ...
  • Conventions: Start the Speculation

    It's only 32 months before summer 2008: time to start speculating about where the Dems and GOP will hold their conventions. Might a post-Katrina New Orleans emerge as a sentimental favorite? Stephen Perry, president of the New Orleans Convention & Visitors Bureau, said the idea "is one we've obviously been thinking about. It's patriotic and it makes business and political sense for either party." The city made the GOP's top three in 2004, and RNC press secretary Tracey Schmitt said about the upcoming bids: "Any interest by New Orleans to host a convention will certainly be a testament to the resiliency of the city. [But] it's premature to speculate at this point." And New Orleans might make good sense for the Dems, reminding voters of the administration's feeble Katrina response. DNC press secretary Josh Earnest said, "We'd be pleased to consider the bid of a rebuilt New Orleans." The parties have said host cities should have at least 20,000 hotel rooms and a 20,000-seat arena....
  • 'They Can Kiss My Ass'

    Only one comedian has ever debuted an album in Billboard's Top Ten, and his last name's not Rock or Romano, Carlin or Cosby. He's Dan Whitney, a.k.a. Larry the Cable Guy, 42, the hillbilly comedian Jay Leno calls "the hottest comic in the country."The accolade belongs to a guy whose act is, in his own words, "the dumbest show you ever seen in your whole life." A typical line: "A buddy of mine's kid had sex with his teacher. The bad part there was he was home schooled." NEWSWEEK's Steve Tuttle talked to Larry last week as he headed to a show in Fresno, Calif.NEWSWEEK: So you have a big rock-star tour bus now?Dan Whitney: I basically live on the bus. I wanted to get something nice. It's going to be home. It's one of them big long ones with a picture of a greyhound on the side. I tour constantly. I did 287 dates last year.Do you think of yourself as a Red State comedian?It's all states. I don't even work that much in the South. I'm from the Midwest. I've got an accent but I acquired...
  • EXCLUSIVE: HE'S AN INDICTED FUGITIVE. BUT IS HE A TERRORIST?

    Unemployed and financially strained, Chris Hajaig lives in suburban Essex, England. He says he spends his days reading the paper and being a stay-at-home dad. He missed a PTA meeting last week, not because he was too busy--he just didn't want to face the other parents. That's because Zayead Christopher Hajaig is an indicted fugitive wanted by the FBI.Scotland Yard's been keeping close tabs on Hajaig, interviewing him in person and, he believes, surveilling his movements. Nonetheless, over the last two weeks he has slipped out to the local Internet cafe to exchange e-mails with NEWSWEEK. Melancholy and regretful, defensive and angry, he laid out his version of what it's like to get ensnared in the antiterror dragnet.Hajaig's name first surfaced on April 7, when an Atlanta Joint Terrorism Task Force bulletin leaked to the press. The bulletin said Hajaig, a 35-year-old Briton born in Nigeria, became aggressive after being denied the chance to upgrade his pilot rating while taking...
  • Getting Out to the Game

    Thirty-four long years have passed since the Senators limped off to Texas to become the Rangers. Now Major League Baseball is finally returning to Washington DC--and the nation's capital is buzzing in anticipation of Thursday's sold-out inaugural home game between the Washington Nationals and the Arizona Diamondbacks. Of course, this being DC, the talk is as much about politics as sports. The former owner of the former Senators is now the current president: George W. Bush is expected to throw out the first pitch, resuming a long dormant Washington tradition. The last DC first ball was thrown out by Richard Nixon; the first by William Howard Taft exactly 95 years ago, on April 14, 1910. In 1950 the ambidextrous Harry Truman threw out two first pitches: one with his left hand and one with his right. If he chooses, this president might watch the game from diamond box 113. The seats, which in the old Senators' days were painted white, are next to the visitors' dugout and have been the...