Susan H.

Stories by Susan H. Greenberg

  • Embracing The Outlets

    It's a gray weekday in mid-November, but Nicolas Sarlandie and Benedicte Poissons are aglow with the thrill of a successful bargain hunt. The pair traveled two hours by car from Paris southeast to Troyes to peruse the 82 shops of the McArthur Glen factory-outlet mall, which offers steep discounts on outdated merchandise by designers like Versace, Armani and Ralph Lauren. Poissons and Sarlandie each spent about $133, Poissons mainly on some black shirts at LA City, and Sarlandie on sports clothes from Lacoste. Heading home, they are tired but happy. "I come here once or twice a year," says Poissons. "But I still remember the bargains I got last year. It's a real kick to get things half price."Europeans are finally catching on to the joys of outlet shopping. New malls are springing up from Manchester to Madrid, offering top labels for discounts of up to 70 percent. With a little careful hunting, shoppers can unearth a coveted Tag Heuer watch, the perfectly fitting Max Mara blazer or...
  • The Ultimate Power Lunch

    Amid world-class gridlock, in-your-face security and scattered protests, some 150 government leaders convened in New York last week for the Millennium Summit, an unprecedented extravaganza at the United Nations to address the world's most urgent problems. The discussions focused heavily on Africa, and included a vow by the Security Council to make peacekeeping operations quicker and more effective. But in the end, the three-day summit achieved little more than vague pledges. Hopes for an extraordinary meeting of North and South Korean officials evaporated when the North's delegates were frisked by American Airlines security personnel in Frankfurt. Offended, the North Koreans turned back home, later denouncing the United States as a "rogue state." And despite President Clinton's determined cajoling, Palestinian leader Yasir Arafat and Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak seemed unwilling to reach a compromise on Jerusalem. Cuban dictator Fidel Castro was in a provocative, even playful...
  • The Crash Of Flight 072

    For Hishama Al-Husseini, bureaucracy turned out to be a blessing. The 27-year-old Egyptian Arabic-language teacher was set to board Gulf Air Flight 072 so he could report for work in Bahrain. But officials wouldn't allow him through the gate because he didn't have the proper work permit. Disappointed, he retrieved his luggage at the airline counter. Then, he says, he noticed a woman standing nearby who was upset because she didn't have a place on the flight. "Don't worry," he told her. "There is one more seat. You will get it." As it turned out, she--and the other 142 people aboard the Airbus A320--couldn't have had worse luck. Four hours after takeoff, and within view of the Bahrain airport, Flight 072 crashed into the Persian Gulf, killing everyone aboard.What caused the twin-engine A320, a plane so highly automated that some Airbus officials say it was designed to be crashproof, to plunge into the water under clear skies? The aircraft made two unsuccessful approaches to the...
  • The Karate Generation

    Vincent Almeroth tried gymnastics. He tried soccer, basketball and baseball, too. But the 11-year-old from Glenview, Ill., is dyslexic, which made it difficult for him to focus on the playing field. There was too much unanticipated movement and interaction with other kids, says his mother, Lisa Terranova. Then three years ago Vincent tried karate. It was an instant hit. His agility and self-confidence improved almost immediately, and his reading has progressed as well. Now the fifth grader is a blue belt. Karate has "given him a greater ability to focus and to struggle with things that are difficult," says Terranova. Vincent puts it more simply: "Karate makes me feel strong and good and happy."Vincent is one of a growing number of kids who are finding success through karate. While martial-arts classes have been popular in America since "The Karate Kid" in 1984, lately they have become as ubiquitous on the extracurricular landscape as Little League and piano lessons. The number of...
  • Play And Pray

    It's Easter time at the American Martyrs Roman Catholic Church in Manhattan Beach, Calif., and the Sunday school is hopping. About 350 preschoolers, many sporting freshly crayoned bunny ears, are bouncing about the school hall while their parents attend mass. The "Easter Lady"--a.k.a. Maggie Wright--arrives, dressed in a colorful spring bonnet. "Merry Christmas!" she bellows, to roars of laughter. "I'm here to tell you about Easter, because Easter's kind of confusing." The room quiets down as she begins to tell a story about an ugly little bulb that blossoms into a beautiful flower. Soon the children are up on their feet, re-enacting the bulb's transformation into shoot, stem and, finally, flower. "Easter is about how things change," Wright tells them. "What starts to happen in spring? The whole world has died and it is brought back to life. God brings it all back every year!" Satisfied, the pre-schoolers dash off for the egg hunt.It may not be the Easter story most grown-ups...
  • Found In America

    Eiko Morokuma has moved to the United States with her husband--twice. The first time, in 1964, it took her many years to adjust. Her husband, Keiji, was doing a post-doctorate in chemistry at Columbia University, and she was stuck at home with a young son. She didn't bond with the other Japanese women she met through the Japan Society of New York, she says, because they were the "snobby" wives of rich executives who spent their time shopping. But after 13 years, three more children and moves to Boston and Rochester, N.Y., Eiko felt so at home in America that she was heartbroken when Keiji accepted an academic position back in Japan. "I felt really sad to be moving back," she says. "I wished we could have stayed longer."Seven years ago they got a chance to return. Keiji accepted a job at Georgia's Emory University, and the Morokumas moved from Nagoya to the Atlanta area. Eiko, now 63, found America vastly changed. For one thing, she says, there were more Japanese everywhere, and not...
  • Mozambique's Tragedy

    The torrential rains began three weeks ago. Yet few outsiders took notice of Mozambique's dangerously rising waters until last week, when it was already too late. In southern Gaza province, the Limpopo River, normally a few hundred meters across, swelled to 16 kilometers wide, washing away village after tiny village as well as the regional capital of Xai-Xai, normally home to 120,000 people. South African military helicopters, which alone came to the rescue, plucked thousands of desperate survivors from rooftops and trees. As many as 100,000 people may still be stranded.So far, nearly a million people have lost their homes in this impoverished African nation. Though the official death count is less than 300, aid workers fear it will climb well into the thousands as floodwaters recede. And with food scarce and livestock rotting in the water, the tragedy can only get worse as hunger and disease begin to spread. According to the Christian aid group World Vision, a tiny local hospital...
  • So Many Causes, So Little Time

    Celebrities have long lent their names and checkbooks to their favorite charity organizations. Not all have shared Bono's savvy and smarts, but they have nonetheless helped raise awareness of--and donations to--a wide variety of causes. A sampling:Princess Diana:Jay and Mavis Leno: The host of American television's "Tonight Show" and his wife recently donated $100,000 to educate the public about the Taliban's oppression of women in Afghanistan. Mavis Leno sits on the board of the Feminist Majority, which is leading the Campaign to Stop Gender Apartheid.Richard Gere: The star of "Pretty Woman" was the first big name to embrace the cause of freedom for Tibet. A devout Buddhist, Gere for more than 15 years has been an outspoken critic of China's occupation of its neighbor. He cofounded New York's Tibet House, a cultural center, and joined the board of the International Campaign, a lobby group with close ties to Tibet's government-in-exile. Gere has met with the Dalai Lama numerous...
  • Pressing The Flesh Online

    It was nearly 10 p.m. on the night before Germany's national elections last fall. Jorg Tauss, a Social Democrat who was fighting to win a second term to the Bundes-tag, stopped by his office to tidy up. When he logged on to his computer, he found scores of e-mail messages waiting for him. "I still don't know why I should vote for you," read one. He sat down and began firing back responses. Typing into the early morning, he outlined his positions and explained why Chancellor Helmut Kohl's Christian Democrats had to go. The effort paid off: Tauss held onto his seat. After the election, constituents e-mailed Tauss to say that his personal attention impressed them and earned him their support. "It definitely got some votes," says Tauss. "I can't say how many, but someone who doesn't use this medium will lose votes."Politicians are getting the electronic message. In the rapidly accelerating world of the Internet, e-campaigning has gone from a novelty to a necessity. From Sweden's Social...
  • Selling The Sun

    Chris Danks is ready. The grass on his Cornwall farm has been neatly mowed. Bright blue plastic pipes carry water to several portable trailers housing toilets, showers and a communal kitchen. In a matter of days, hordes of campers will begin descending on his property, Trevease Farm, for a glimpse of the century's last total solar eclipse. Danks first got the idea to rent campsites on his farm a year ago, when Cornwall started buzzing with hype about the Aug. 11 event. Realizing that his farm, high above the sparkling waters of Falmouth Bay, lies directly in the path of totality, Danks--along with scores of other enterprising Cornish farmers--began advertising on his own Web site. So far, Danks has booked 130 of his 200 makeshift campsites, at £20 per pitch for a minimum of four nights. Though he initially dreamed of earning bundles of quick cash, now Danks says he expects merely to break even. "Hey," he says, "that's fine." After all, it's not everyone who gets to serve as a host...
  • Hatred In London

    It was the start of the long may Day weekend in London, and Soho's streets were jammed with tourists, shoppers, diners and drinkers reveling in the balmy weather and the prospect of a three-day break. Jean-Pierre Trevor, a London-born filmmaker, had just stopped by to see a friend at a film-editing studio, when a deafening explosion suddenly propelled them three feet across the room. At first they thought a plane had crashed into a nearby building. But when they ran outside and saw shattered glass blanketing the sidewalks and streets, says Trevor, "I thought, 'That's got to be a bomb'."He was right. Planted inside the Admiral Duncan, a cozy gay pub on Old Compton Street, the nail bomb abruptly turned a scene of routine weekend merrymaking into a chilling wasteland of smoke, rubble and blood. Outside the gutted pub, people rushed around in panic and confusion. Scores of the injured lay on the ground, their skin red and peeling. Some were bleeding profusely, riddled with nails and...
  • Nursing Trouble

    Sue Anderson always assumed she would breast-feed. She knew about the health benefits of breast milk for babies, and she looked forward to sharing the close physical bond. After Victor was born in a Denver hospital last December, she put him to her breast and he suckled immediately. For the first two days he fed frequently and seemed satisfied. But Anderson's breasts never engorged with milk, and Victor became increasingly agitated, "wailing and sleeping only for short periods of time," she says. "He would even beat my breast with his hand." By the fifth day Victor had lost 12 percent of his birth weight. Both the pediatrician and a lactation consultant advised her to supplement with formula. "I cried all day," says Anderson, 37. "I couldn't believe I was starving my baby and didn't know it."It's something that most new mothers don't know: breast-feeding doesn't always work. The way the baby books describeit, breast-feeding is a foolproof, natural act that every woman can perform....
  • Beyond The Blues

    After Randy Berman gave birth to Jordan five years ago, she couldn't understand why she was so miserable. She had a beautiful, healthy son. Yet she felt hopeless and anxious and couldn't sleep or sit still. She began to fantasize about hurting herself or the baby. When she changed his diaper, she'd think, "What if I pushed him off the table?" Hammering a nail into the wall, she'd ask herself, "What would happen if I hurt myself or Jordan?" She was too ashamed to tell her husband, Brian. "Why were these thoughts running through my head?" says Berman, 33, a former mortgage-company manager who now works at a health club. "I felt so bad, so guilty. I was a terrible mother." One night she decided she couldn't take it anymore. After writing a note to Brian, who was sleeping in their New Jersey home, she swallowed 50 sleeping pills. Then, after having second thoughts, she nudged him awake.Berman spent 10 days in the hospital and another 10 at a psychiatric facility. Misdiagnosed with...
  • The Loving Ties That Bond

    When goslings hatch, they will immediately become attached to the first moving object they see, whether it's their mother or the Energizer bunny. Human babies are smarter. Even in utero, they begin to recognize the muffled voices of those who will care for them. By 10 days of age, they can distinguish the smell of their mother's breast milk from that of another woman. Around 5 weeks, babies demonstrate a preference for their primary caretakers by smiling or vocalizing. They follow them intently, first with their eyes, then later on hands and knees. By 9 months, many infants scream when their parents try to leave, as if to say, "I can't bear being without you!" ...