Book Preview 2012


Bringing Up Bebe

By Pamela Druckerman

WHAT Amy Chua did for Tiger Mothers, Pamela Druckerman promises to do for French parents. A book sure to generate controversy for her strong case for the Gallic way of parenting. (February)

The Man Without a Face

By Masha Gessen

As Russians take to the streets to protest their once and future president, Vladimir Putin, Masha Gessen steps into the fray with a perceptive account of the new czar. (March)


The Social Conquest of Earth

By Edward O. Wilson

One of the greatest scientists alive delivers his magnum opus: a book that proposes nothing less than a new way of looking at life by saying that group, not kin, selection has determined human evolution. (April)


The Passage of Power

By Robert A. Caro

The fourth volume of Caro’s monumental biography follows Lyndon Johnson’s rise to the vice presidency, through the ordeal of the Kennedy assassination and then to the presidency. (May)



By Jonah Lehrer

From the fiendishly clever Lehrer, a delightful examination of the science of creativity—and how we can all learn how to be more creative. (March)


Behind The Beautiful Forevers

By Katherine Boo

In a deeply reported account by Pulitzer Prize winner Boo, the vicissitudes of modern Mumbai are revealed through the intimate story of one slum community within sight of awesome luxury. (February)



By Thomas Mallon

A master of the historical novel turns Watergate into a dark comedy, rotating point of view among the supporting cast, with Nixon as a sort of Malvolio—comical, pitiable, tragic. (February)



By Kathryn Harrison

After Rasputin’s death, his teenage daughter, Masha, is brought to live with the czar’s family and, in Harrison’s imagined history, becomes close to Prince Alyosha, with whom she schemes and fantasizes of a world that will never be. (March)


In One Person

By John Irving

With his unfailing ability to fuse comedy and tragedy, the political and the personal, and all on the same page, Irving delivers fiction in the first person, featuring a bisexual man living through the ’80s. (May)


What we talk about when we talk about anne frank

By Nathan Englander

Englander returns to doing what he does best: writing stories. Jewishness is a subject, but so are otherness, love and betrayal, marriage, childhood. (February)


Private Empire

By Steve Coll

In truth we haven’t seen it yet, so we can’t tell you much more than that we want to read anything Coll writes and that ExxonMobil, the subject of his new book, should be afraid, very afraid. (May)


The Fear Index

By Robert Harris

In this taut thriller, Harris delivers a superbly entertaining read for our time. A hedge-fund wizard with an artificial-intelligence program for predicting the market finds himself hunted. (February)


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