A Breakdown of Afghanistan War Costs

The current cost to station 68,000 U.S. troops in Afghanistan: just over $65 billion—or, to quote a figure politicians have extrapolated, about $1 million a soldier. (Obama's budget director has cited this ratio in estimating surge costs.) Why so much? A breakdown, using 2010 Defense numbers:

OPERATIONS: The biggest expense—transporting soldiers and equipment to, and around, Afghanistan.
49%*
$473,371

WORN-OUT GEAR: When units leave, their damaged stuff gets a complete overhaul or is replaced altogether.
12.5%
$120,339

PROTECTIVE MATERIALS: Armor and equipment, including 1,080 Òmine-resistant, ambush-protected vehicles.
11.9%
$114,956

TRAINING AFGHANS: Providing Afghan National Security Forces with infrastructure and arms.
11.4%
$109,747

INTELLIGENCE: Includes airborne sensors and surveillance of high-value targets.
5.75%
$55,275

CONSTRUCTION:

Flexible funds for small-scale civil and humanitarian projects and miscellaneous building costs.

3.98%

$38,212

COALITION SUPPORT: Reimbursement for operational and logistical support by cooperating nations.
2.87%
$27,574

RESEARCH: Development of technology to combat IEDs (improvised explosive devices).
1.2%
$11,287

TRAINING PAKISTANIS: Financial support for Pakistani Security Forces to secure borders and fight insurgents.
1.1%
$10,294

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