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  • Kraft CEO on the Spirit of Volunteerism

    The President and First Lady have asked Americans to volunteer—informally and through the new Serve America Act, which will take effect on Oct. 1. There are many ways to help, but most important, the Obamas have simply said, "Get involved!"Volunteerism is a thread that runs throughout our country's history. But even with the White House call to action, this thread is beginning to fray.According to a report from the National Conference on Citizenship, in the midst of the recession 72 percent of Americans have cut back on civic participation, which includes the time spent volunteering. Two thirds say that Americans are responding to the economic downturn by helping themselves. And while half have given food or money to charitable causes, the numbers suggest that the American tradition of volunteering is stalling.What I'm seeing both at home and abroad is that people want to pitch in, but they are finding it harder to do so in a difficult economic environment.To stop the unraveling,...
  • Women and the Economy: An Emerging Growth Market

    It hasn't been easy to find a bright spot in the global economy for a couple of years now. Growth markets, once as numerous as no-interest mortgage options, have grown scarce. But in the last few months, economists, consultants, and other business types have begun to track the rise of a new emerging market, one that may end up being the largest and most powerful of all: women. According to a new study by the Boston Consulting Group, women are now poised to drive the post-recession world economy, thanks to an estimated $5 trillion in new female-earned income that will be coming on line over the next five years. Worldwide, total income for men ($23.4 trillion) is still more than double that for women ($10.5 trillion), but the gap is poised to shrink significantly because the vast majority of new income growth over the next few years will go to women, due to a narrowing wage gap and rising female employment. That means women will be the ones driving the shopping—and, economists hope,...
  • An Interview with Avon CEO Andrea Jung

    Over her decade-long run as CEO of Avon, Andrea Jung has not only turned the once ailing company around by tripling profits, but also employed an unmatched force of women worldwide. She spoke with NEWSWEEK'S Nick Reilly about the role of women in the global recession. Excerpts: ...
  • Stephen Roach on 'The Next Asia'

    When Morgan Stanley Asia chairman Stephen Roach talks, people listen: his opinions on the global economy have been known to shape policy from Beijing to Washington. For years, as the bank's chief economist, he was one of the Cassandras of the global economy, warning boom-day investors to be wary of the imbalances that eventually led to the financial crisis. Now, as its top executive in Asia, he's got a new book, The Next Asia, out this month. The warning this time: while Asia is rising, the coming power shift from West to East won't be as easy as everyone thinks. "It's a myth that the baton of economic leadership is being seamlessly passed to the BRICs, in particular China. My premise is there is still a lot of work to be done," says Roach.  ...
  • Creating the Chinese Google

    Back in 2002, Chinese billionaire Li Ka-shing, Asia's most successful entrepreneur, founded the Cheung Kong Graduate School of Business in Beijing to turn out a new kind of Chinese global leader. Cheung Kong has since become the country's top business school, with graduates like Alibaba chairman Jack Ma and CNOOC president Fu Chengyu. Here the school's dean, Xiang Bing, tells NEWSWEEK'S Rana Foroohar why China needs to move beyond entrepreneurship. ...
  • Why Disney Bought Marvel

    After animating Disney's profit by acquiring Pixar, CEO Bob Iger has now drawn Marvel Comics into the Magic Kingdom
  • Investors Take a Crack at the Hitler Downfall Meme

    Today, Hitler gets a new reason to throw one of his epic meme-making temper tantrums: he's missed the market bottom.Sadly, this incarnation of the meme is surely one of his lesser efforts. For one, it's about a bull market, not the Cowboys getting gloriously pummeled by the Giants (obviously, I'm biased). More egregiously, though, a slide at the very end makes it clear that the meme has been co-opted by an investment company trying to convince people to, well, invest. It seems Shares Property Money, the website behind the video, has turned Hitler's rant into a long advertisement for their investment strategies DVD.Shameless though it may be, still, they have a point. The video is making the rounds in investor circles, with some saying it perfectly captures the mood of the folks in the know about the markets. Sure enough, smart bulls like Barton Biggs do think people should be in the market now. But before you go stocking up on investment DVDs, just remember:...
  • New Economic Trend Against Freebies

    "You can make money giving things away," says Chris Anderson, author of the bestseller Free: The Future of a Radical Price (price: $26.99). "There really is a free lunch." But powerful economic trends generate equal forces pushing in the other direction. Google may prosper by giving away services and data. But the technological revolution Anderson celebrates—and the challenging economic environment—are pushing many enterprises to ask customers to shell out for goods and services that used to come gratis. Paid is rapidly becoming the new free.When he acquired The Wall Street Journal in August 2007, Rupert Murdoch considered liberating the paper's digital journalism, even though 1.06 million people pay to subscribe to WSJ.com. But as the advertising that supports his many media platforms dried up like the Outback in January, the wily media mogul performed a backflip. "We intend to charge for all our news Web sites," he said in August. Customers of airlines—one of the few industries...
  • Forbes: The New Sexual Harassment

    Sexual harassment isn't about being chased around the desk anymore. It's about flirtation, subtle power plays, retaliation and, of course, text messages.
  • The States Most Likely to Wind Up Like California

    California's crippling deficit resulted from overspending, foreclosures, contradicting ballot initiatives, and a two thirds majority needed to pass a budget. But 48 states face deficits, and some are in real danger of falling into the same hole that the Golden State did.NEW YORKThe state's revenues were hit hard by Wall Street's financial collapse, leading to a $20.1 billion deficit. It's a heavy spender on social services, too. With state senators busy turning off the lights and locking the Senate chamber doors, is there much confidence that the legislature is equipped to handle future crises?FLORIDAWhen home values shot up, property-tax caps prevented Florida from reaping the benefits. The state's $5.9 billion deficit wasn't as high as California's, but Florida has no income tax and foreclosures are eating away at revenues. Florida's 2010 budget diverted property taxes from schools—forcing school boards to raise taxes themselves.NEVADAWithout an income tax, Nevada relies heavily...
  • Cash for Clunkers Gets More Cash

    'Cash for clunkers' has been a success so far for consumers. But the program may not help the U.S. carmakers that need it the most.