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  • Real Estate: Why the Market Will Worsen

    Economist David Lereah was once the housing market's biggest cheerleader. Now he says the bust isn't near over, and home prices still have a long way to fall.
  • Samuelson: Protecting the Jobless

    Lengthening the coverage period for unemployment insurance from 26 to 39 weeks is common sense--but will it get bogged down in partisan politics?
  • Gross: The Age of Grand Dilution

    Given that National City had to raise capital quickly, selling stock at a huge discount was 'the least unattractive' alternative.
  • Travel: At Your Service

    The typical butler is no longer a tuxedo-clad gentleman who does everything from answer the door to assist with personal grooming. These days, butlers are becoming more specialized, as top hotels hire them to provide such niche services as drawing baths, serving frozen snacks and supplying technological support.At the El Dorado Maroma in Riviera Maya, Mexico, beach butlers supply guests with tanning products, reading material, water vaporizers and towels (karismahotels .com; $677 per night).The Personal In-Loft Spa Butler at the MGM Grand's Skylofts hotel in Las Vegas sets each room's lighting, aromatherapy and sound systems, while the Dream Butler guarantees a good night's sleep with a selection of pillows, herbal teas and soothing music (skyloftsmgm grand.com; $510 per night).At the Hotel Monasterio in Cuzco, Peru, bath butlers fill tubs to guests' specifications, drawing from a menu that includes candles, aromatic salts, rose petals and bubbles; they also offer champagne,...
  • ‘What’s The Red Key For?’

    Teens may not know much about big business, but they sure know about cell phones. A Dutch firm is now sending high-schoolers into corporate settings to tutor technologically challenged workers. Both populations benefit, says Anita van der Stap, who created a company, Bellen doe je zo (translation: "this is how you call") to run the workshops.The students are typically 15- and 16-year-olds from lower socioeconomic immigrant families. They study in an Amsterdam vocational program that prepares them for trade school or apprenticeships. Van der Stap, who runs entrepreneurship classes at the school, got the idea when a bank executive speaking to her students needed their help to answer a text message. She persuaded wireless firm KPN Telecom to underwrite workshops, recruited a dozen students and spent three months training them. The one-hour workshops use a funny quiz (Q: What's a booty call?), PowerPoint presentations and individual coaching to teach text messaging, photo-sharing and...
  • Hot Spots: Al Faisaliah Hotel, Riyadh

    This luxury Rosewood property, in the oversize Al Faisaliah building, caters to both business and leisure travelers. Rooms: The 197 rooms and 27 suites range from approximately $320 to $3,700. Décor: The look is classic, focused on clean lines and neutral colors, with art-deco and Oriental accents. The supersize bathrooms are among Saudi Arabia's biggest, and a touchscreen remote adjusts each room's lighting, curtains and temperature. Food: For those not in the mood for the more formal Globe, Il Terrazzo serves Brazilian churrasco, a variety of slow-roasted meats, on an open-air terrace overlooking a lushly landscaped plaza. Amenities: All rooms are attended by a round-the-clock butler, who can make bookings, arrange couriers, pack and unpack bags and handle just about any request—no matter how indulgent.
  • Smart Giving

    Writing checks isn't enough. The new style of philanthropy is hands-on and disciplined.
  • Roses Are Not Always Red

    A rose is always a rose, and this spring they'll be on lots of garments and accessories. For chilly days, Anthropologie puts a golden vine of roses on a silk and wool scarf ($88). They garnish Prada's satin clutch ($695; bergdorfgoodman.com). Jean-Michel Cazabat covers a black silk shoe with a blossoming vine ($495, available in June; barneys .com). Rosettes accent a sterling-silver Tiffany bangle ($395), and hang with cultured pearls on a necklace ($850; tiffany.com). Fendi's short lemon-chiffon dress is flush with cascading silk rose petals ($1,710; bergdorfgoodman .com). And Judith Leiber's Precious Rose purse features a tiered mosaic of 1,169 pink sapphires, 800 tourmalines and 1,016 diamonds—more than 42 carats' worth (about $92,000, dependent on the market; 212-223-2999). Don't say we never promised you a rose garden.
  • An Oil Oasis

    Saudi Arabia challenges our ideas about the Gulf world.
  • The Road Ahead for Cars

    A General Motors leader says small and electric are the wave of the future. But don't expect the U.S. fleet to resemble Europe's until gas passes $10 a gallon.
  • Quick Read

    The Turnaround Kid: What I Learned Rescuing America's Most Troubled Companies By Steve MillerSteve Miller has had an extraordinary career that many of his readers may be glad they haven't shared. After making his name as Lee Iacocca's wingman during the 1979 rescue of Chrysler, he became the go-to guy for foundering companies, the CEO you hired to parachute in to save the likes of Bethlehem Steel, real-estate colossus Olympia & York and, most recently, the still-bankrupt auto-parts maker Delphi. Miller resists the temptation to burnish his own legacy, frankly examining his failures along with his successes while also sympathetically recounting the struggles of his late wife, who died of cancer as he fought to keep Delphi going.Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth, and Happiness By Richard H. Thaler and Cass R. SunsteinDespite the hypey, buzzy title, which evokes too many superficial books that purport to define the hidden forces lurking behind everyday life, there's...
  • Samuelson: The End of Shopping

    For two decades, it's been driven by rising debt levels. At the end of 2007, household borrowing was a dizzying $14 trillion.
  • BAILEY: With McCain and the Economy, Is the Third Time the Charm?

    Here's my NEWSWEEK colleague Holly Bailey with a report from the McCain caravan in Pennsylvania, where the Arizona senator sought this morning to establish greater credibility on 2008's top issue: the struggling economy. Read my earlier dispatch from last week's Brooklyn event here.PITTSBURGH, Penn.--For the ...
  • Five Star And Far Out

    Luxury hotels are cropping up in such remote locales as Azerbaijan and Inner Mongolia.
  • Escape From Caracas

    High inflation is encouraging Venezuelans to spend their cash on foreign travel—while they still can.