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  • Wal-Mart Heiress's Museum Unnerves Art Elites

    Alice Walton made a deal last November to buy Thomas Eakins's 1876 masterpiece "The Gross Clinic" from Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia for $68 million. Walton (Sam's daughter and Wal-Mart heiress) wanted it not for her living room but to hang in the public museum she's creating in her hometown of Bentonville, Ark. "This is the holy grail of American painting," said John Wilmerding, a trustee of the National Gallery and Walton's art adviser. But Wilmerding should have remembered that the holy grail is elusive. When news of the sale broke, the City of Brotherly Love went ballistic. Thanks to a clause in the deal, Philadelphia was given 45 days to match the price. Locals turned their pockets inside out, whether it was an art student's dropping a few bucks in a coffee can or the Annenberg Foundation's rushing a $10 million gift. Anne d'Harnoncourt, director of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, thought losing "The Gross Clinic" would be like Amsterdam's losing Rembrandt's "The...
  • Book Excerpt: Holly Peterson's 'The Manny'

    If you want to see rich people act really rich, go to St. Henry’s School for Boys at three p.m. on any weekday. Nothing makes rich people crazier than being around other rich people who might be richer than they are. Private school drop-off and pickup really gets them going. It’s an opportunity to stake their claim, show their wares, and let the other parents know where they rank in the top .001 percent of the top .0001 percent.A cavalcade of black SUVs, minivans, and chauffeured cars snaked its way up the block beside me as I ran to my son’s after-school game. I’d skipped another meeting at work, but nothing was going to keep me that day. Gingko trees and limestone mansions lined the street where a crowd gathered in front of the school. I steeled myself and waded into a sea of parents: the dads in banker suits barking into their phones, the moms with their glamorous sunglasses and toned upper arms-many with dressed-up little darlings by their sides.These children play an important...
  • Talk Transcript: Sean Smith on Angelina Jolie

    "A Mighty Heart," starring Angelina Jolie, is based on the best-selling book by Mariane Pearl about the murder of her husband, Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl, by Al Qaeda members in Karachi, Pakistan, in early 2002. The movie details Mariane's struggle—with the help of Journal editors, Pakistan counterterrorism experts, FBI agents and others—to unravel the terrorist network and find Danny. Much in Mariane's life has changed since then, including the birth of their son, Adam, who is now 5 years old. The film opens June 22. Pearl spoke to NEWSWEEK's Sean Smith from her home in Paris about the film, her friendship with Jolie, the politics of terror, and the true meaning of revenge. Excerpts: ...
  • Fewer Americans Are Hunting and Fishing

    If you’re a squirrel or a trout, we’ve got some good news for you: Americans are hunting and fishing less. Every five years, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service puts together a massive survey of outdoor recreation, and the 2006 preliminary numbers were released today. They show ominous trends, depending on your worldview—or species. The number of anglers has dropped 12 percent since 2001; the hunter count has fallen off by 4 percent during the same five-year period. This doesn’t mean Americans aren’t spending time outdoors or interacting with wild animals; “wildlife watching” is up 8 percent since 2001. They’re just choosing not to kill them so much.Though the final report won’t be available until November of this year, the preliminary findings reveal a downward pattern that worries many sportsmen: over the last 15 years or so, millions fewer people have been hunting and fishing in a country with a rapidly expanding population. There are countless reasons for the trend, chief among...
  • Books: The Return of Arkady Renko

    I was telling a friend the other day that I was nearly done with the Martin Cruz Smith novel “Stalin’s Ghost” and that I was enjoying it. “Well, he’s got a good character,” my friend commented. My friend is no fool. Arkady Renko, Smith’s much-abused Moscow police detective, is, for a fact, a great character. And durable, having now lived through six novels, a trip to Cuba, a sojourn in Chernobyl and an impersonation by William Hurt in the movie of “Gorky Park.”Renko is an unwilling hero. He isn’t particularly idealistic, or if he is, his idealism is all wrapped up in his professionalism. He can’t stand to do anything less than a thorough job. So, near the beginning of “Stalin’s Ghost,” he comes across a crime scene—a man face down at his kitchen table with a cleaver in his neck and a hysterical, blood-spattered wife in the bedroom. Detectives are already on the scene, the woman has confessed, and yet Renko can’t help asking questions. He’s bothered by the angle of the cleaver, by...
  • The Best Endings, and the Worst

    Say what you will about how “The Sopranos” ended—and people are still giving us an earful—it got us thinking about what makes a good ending to a story … and a bad ending. So in the time it takes to say “happily ever after,” we began assembling lists of good endings for movies, television series and books, and some bad ones. Curiously, it was much harder to think of bad endings—remember, we’re not talking about all good or all bad movies, books or shows—that’s a list for another day. No, the trick here is to name works of art that end memorably, one way or the other.
  • Is Reality TV Over?

    Donald Trump has a natural gift for spinning bad news in his favor. When his reality competition show “The Apprentice” turned up conspicuously missing from NBC's fall line-up, he immediately pounced with a statement saying that he wasn't being fired from the show, he was quitting to work on another “major new TV venture.”Trump's “Apprentice” business partner, reality TV's eminent creative mind Mark Burnett, will have much more trouble untangling himself from the wreckage. While his biggest franchises—“Survivor” and “The Apprentice”--effectively revolutionized television and dominated ratings in their early seasons, Burnett's recent endeavors have not yielded the same returns.This summer, Burnett debuted two new series, “On the Lot,” on Fox, and “Pirate Master,” on CBS. “On the Lot,” an “Apprentice”-style competition with aspiring filmmakers, bowed to an audience of just 8.5 million viewers, which means it lost around 70 percent of the 30 million viewers who were watching the ...
  • Oops. The Movie's Leaked Online

    Michael Moore's new documentary about America's health-care system and pharmaceutical industry may be called “Sicko,” but chances are he's the one feeling a little queasy today. Although it's not due to hit theaters until June 29, “Sicko” is already playing on thousands of screens across the country—the result of a leak that has it playing for free on numerous peer-to-peer networks online, including BitTorrent, Pirate Bay and others.Moore, the controversial left-leaning director behind “Farenheit 9/11” and “Bowling for Columbine,” could not be immediately reached for comment. But a spokesperson at The Weinstein Company, Moore's distributor, tried to put a positive spin on the apparent piracy. “Health care impacts everybody right in their homes, and it is not surprising that people are eager to see 'Sicko' and become part of a larger movement,” Sarah Rothman wrote in an e-mail to NEWSWEEK. “We are responding aggressively to protect our film, but from our research it is clear that...
  • L.A. County Sheriff: Too Close to Hollywood?

    Los Angeles County Sheriff Leroy (Lee) Baca has a distinguished record. A popular elected official, Baca, a Republican, has run virtually unopposed since first winning office in 1998. He has been praised by civil-rights groups, civil libertarians, minority activists and others for establishing programs for mental illness, drug abuse and domestic violence, plus an independent office to investigate officer misconduct. Despite all that, Baca will undoubtedly be best remembered as the man who gave Paris Hilton a GET OUT OF JAIL FREE card.Baca drew the world's attention when he released the hotel heiress from jail after having served only a few days of her sentence for violating probation on an alcohol-related reckless-driving charge. The move was swiftly reversed by a Los Angeles Superior Court judge, who sent Paris back to the pokey—and put Baca on the hot seat. A recall petition has been mounted by his critics. And the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors has ordered Baca to report...
  • Starr: Baseball's Racial Divide

    Many black fans believe Barry Bonds is being singled out. He is. But that doesn't necessarily mean his treatment has been unfair.
  • Remembering Ruth Bell Graham

    Mornings were chaos. “Four full-blooded little Grahams,” the young mother wrote in her journal. “ I feel this a.m. it’s gotten quite beyond me. They fight, they yell, they answer back. Breakfast is dreadful ... Now they’ve gone off to school looking nice enough (for once) and with a good breakfast but with the scrappiest of family prayers ... Grumbling, interrupting, slurring one another, impudent to me. So now they’re off, I’m in bed with my Bible thinking it through—or rather, trying to.”Ruth Bell Graham wrote this in 1957 while her husband Billy Graham was off crusading in New York City, a reminder that behind public lives—for no one has lived more publicly than Billy Graham—are extraordinary lives lived in private. The passage also makes the poignant point that with her death on June 14 at age 87, the Graham family has lost its heart. “I am so grateful to the Lord that He gave me Ruth,” Billy Graham said in a statement issued after her death. “Especially for these last few years...
  • 'Ocean's 13': Let's Hear It for the Boys

    Supercool and superclever, "Ocean's Eleven" was everything you'd want in a heist movie. "Twelve" was everything you didn't want in a sequel: Steven Soderbergh, George Clooney, Brad Pitt, Matt Damon & Co. threw a party, and forgot to invite the audience. In "Thirteen," the boys are trying to make amends. They partly succeed. The fog of self-satisfaction has mostly lifted. There's actually a coherent script (by Brian Koppelman and David Levien), and there are some real laughs. Not big laughs, mind you, but a fairly steady stream of smiles and chuckles. And their newest caper is, as expected, fiendishly complex and outlandishly executed.Here's the deal: Danny Ocean's gang reconvenes to get revenge. Their target: the nastiest, most unscrupulous casino tycoon in Vegas, Willy Bank (Al Pacino). He double-crossed their old pal Reuben (Elliott Gould) out of his partnership in Bank's new hotel, so the guys want to make sure everything goes wrong on the opening night of Bank's spectacular...
  • Rebuilding Rome as a Virtual City

    How do you say megabyte in Latin? Ancient Rome was reborn—as a virtual city—today, when a team of American and Italian academics unveiled Rome Reborn, a real-time 3-D computer reconstruction that allows visitors to navigate the ancient city as if it were 320 A.D. again. Thanks to the complex software run on PCs, modern visitors can fly over the ancient city, pan down into the Colosseum, cruise the Roman Forum and stroll into the Senate building. The aim is to provide a new tool for scholars of the ancient city to imagine how the buildings may have looked in greater detail than two-dimensional models afford.Virtual Rome wasn’t built in a day, either. The first digital real-time reconstruction of the ancient city marks the end of a 10-year effort by an academic team of architects, computer scientists and archaeologists from UCLA, the Milan Polytechnic and the University of Virginia, headed by UCLA architecture and urban-design professor Diane Favro and Bernard Frischer, a classics...
  • 'Truth Is, I'm the Same Guy I Always Was'

    Paul McCartney hasn't slowed down. In the midst of a messy divorce, the 40th anniversary of "Sgt. Pepper" and preparations for his 65th birthday, McCartney is releasing his 22nd post-Beatles studio disc, "Memory Almost Full," on Starbucks' Hear Music label. Nostalgic yet inventive, it's his most vibrant record in years—and the first one to come out on Apple's iTunes store. McCartney spoke to NEWSWEEK's Andrew Romano and Daniel Klaidman last week by phone while driving through the English countryside to rehearse with his band for an upcoming series of (shh!) secret, small-club shows. Excerpts: ...
  • Talk Transcript: Islam in America

    It's near midnight in a small Fairfax, Va., bar, and Omar Waqar stands on a makeshift stage, brooding in a black tunic and brown cap. He stops playing his electric guitar long enough to survey the crowd—an odd mix of local punks and collared preps—before screaming into the microphone: "Stop the hate! Stop the hate!" Stopping hate is a fairly easy concept to get behind at a punk-rock show, and the crowd yells and pumps its fists right on cue. But it's safe to say that Waqar and his band, Diacritical, aren't shouting about the same kind of hate as the audience. Waqar wants to stop the kind that made people call him "sand flea" as a kid and throw rocks through the windows of the Islamic bookstore he worked at on 9/11. Waqar, 26, the son of a Pakistani immigrant, is a Muslim—a punk-rock Muslim.Muslim punk rock certainly sounds like an oxymoron, especially since fundamentalist Muslims condemn all music as haram (forbidden). But Diacritical is one of about a dozen Islamic punk-rock bands...
  • Tony Soprano, Harry Potter: The Same Story?

    It is, in a way, a sort of split-level love affair. For the past decade, children have been staying up late to finish the latest installments concerning the fortunes of Harry Potter. Meanwhile, downstairs in the TV room, Mom and Dad have been watching the saga of Tony Soprano. Harry got out of the gate a little earlier, in 1997, but Tony, whom we first observed wading after those ducks in his swimming pool in 1999, wasn't far behind. Now the serial stories that have captivated American children and their parents for much of the last 10 years are ending within two months of each other. That's a coincidence. What's less a matter of chance is that the big question about each series is the same: will Harry/Tony die in the end? And that raises a truly fascinating question: have these two sets of fans been obsessed with two versions of what is, in fact, the same story?Superficially, the two stories could not be more different: One occupies a magical realm where apprentice wizards learn...
  • ‘Sexsomnia’: Rare Form of Sleep Walking

    When Jan Luedecke of Toronto was arrested and tried for sexual assault, he had an unusual defense—he did it in his sleep. Really. It may sound farfetched, but Luedecke, who was 33 at his 2005 trial, had a history of sleepwalking. On the night in question, he'd been drinking at a party and found himself sacked out on the couch with a woman he'd met there. Hours later, she jolted him awake and demanded to know what he was doing. Luedecke claimed he was unaware he was having sex with her. "Under the law, if there's no intent to commit a crime, you haven't committed a crime," says Dr. Colin Shapiro, director of the Youthdale Child and Adolescent Sleep Center in Toronto, who testified for the defense. Luedecke was acquitted (to the outrage of women's organizations in Canada), and the case is now on appeal.Add sex to the roster of unlikely sleep behaviors known as parasomnias, which range from sleep driving to sleep eating. Last week psychiatrist Carlos Schenck and neurologist Mark...
  • Sloan: It's Not All About Money

    If all you care about is reported profits, you wouldn't want any part of owning The Wall Street Journal. The paper, for all its cachet and influence, is at best marginally profitable; the profits of its parent, Dow Jones, come primarily from electronic data distribution. But the Journal, financial laggard though it may be, is the primary reason that Rupert Murdoch and possibly other players are willing to pay $5 billion or more for Dow Jones.Here's the deal. In a fragmenting world in which anyone with an Internet connection can become a "content provider" and start-ups like Google or Yahoo can lure tons of targeted advertising dollars, the Journal is still a central, trusted institution that's required reading for much of the business world. A journalistic megabrand, the Journal tries to make sense of what's going on in the financial world, then presents its findings in what I consider a highly professional, generally disinterested manner. (I'm talking about the Journal's news pages...
  • BeliefWatch: Budding Buddhists

    The Beliefnet.com post is typical teenage angst, but with a twist. Mother is a zealous new convert to Roman Catholicism. Father is along for the ride. "Silentmist" wants an answer to this question: "How should I go about telling [my mother] about my Buddhism?"We should have seen this coming. The baby boomers experimented with everything; they left their childhood faiths for other faiths or nothing at all; they intermarried and raised their children to be "spiritual but not religious." Now a small but growing number find themselves in the uncomfortable but not necessarily unhappy position of driving their high-school-age kids to Buddhist retreats. Diana Winston, the author of "Wide Awake: A Buddhist Guide for Teens," has been teaching Buddhism to youth for more than a decade, and she says she's seen it change from a fringe practice to something normal and accepted, especially on the coasts. (In the middle of the country, Winston says, kids sometimes practice Buddhism in secret; they...
  • After 'The Sopranos', HBO's Next Act

    To help remodel the house that Tony Soprano built, HBO will unveil five original series over the next year, including a show about a combustible family of California surfers, a broad satire of filthy-rich Friends of Dubya set deep in the heart of Texas and a relationship drama with scenes of raw sexuality between four different couples, among them a pair of white-haired sixtysomethings. That last show is called "Tell Me You Love Me," and it could lead to a revision of HBO's time-honored slogan: it's not TV, it's an old man's butt. Yet HBO's most radical new show might turn out to be "In Treatment," debuting this fall and starring Gabriel Byrne. It's about a therapist who talks to his patients about their problems. "I know. Yawn," says Carolyn Strauss, HBO's president of original programming. But just as "The Sopranos" was no ordinary Mafia tale, "In Treatment" is not your average show about a shrink. It's a half-hour drama—a rarity in itself—and it will air five nights a week for...
  • 'Mr. Brooks': Murder in 12 Steps

    If you've seen the trailer for the Kevin-Costner-is-a-killer movie "Mr. Brooks," you might fear that the entire plot has been given away. The good news: there are many twists, turns, subplots and surprises that the coming attractions don't even hint at. The bad news: these twists and turns are so preposterous, or so irrelevant, that they undermine the movie they're meant to tart up.The title character, played by Costner, is a pillar of the Portland, Ore., community, a happily married husband and father who has an unfortunate addiction to murder. He even goes to AA meetings to deal with his problem, though he's understandably reticent about sharing. His only confidant is—himself: Mr. Brooks has a devilish alter ego who goads him on in his life of crime, and this evil id-dude is played, very cannily, by William Hurt. As the bickering sides of Mr. Brooks's twisted psyche, Costner and Hurt have a delicious chemistry, but it doesn't bode well for a movie when the only two compelling...
  • New Laws to Protect Public Breast Feeding

    A few weeks ago, the actress Maggie Gyllenhaal visited a public park in New York—and breast-fed her 8-month-old daughter, Ramona. Kudos, right? After all, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that moms nurse for at least a year. Nope. Gawker.com posted a picture of a partially exposed breast and called it a "momtroversy." The photo is now on a "nude" Web site.What gives? Even formula makers say "breast is best." Nursing reduces a baby's risk of diarrhea, ear infections, urinary-tract infections and bacterial infections (and perhaps food allergies, obesity and diabetes). It also lowers a mom's risk of breast and ovarian cancer—and, since it burns 500 calories a day, helps her lose weight. And it's free, while formula costs about $1,500 a year. Yet new evidence shows that there has been a decline in the number of women breast-feeding, reversing a steady increase over the past three decades. "The culture does very little to support mothers in what they need—information,...
  • Quindlen: Driving to The Funeral

    If someone told you that there was one behavior most likely to lead to the premature death of your kid, wouldn't you do something about that?
  • Book Excerpt: 'The Keep' By Jennifer Egan

    The castle was falling apart, but at 2 a.m. under a useless moon, Danny couldn’t see this. What he saw looked solid as hell: two round towers with an arch between them and across that arch was an iron gate that looked like it hadn’t moved in three hundred years or maybe ever.He’d never been to a castle before or even this part of the world, but something about it all was familiar to Danny. He seemed to remember the place from a long time ago, not like he’d been here exactly but from a dream or a book. The towers had those square indentations around the top that little kids put on castles when they draw them. The air was cold with a smoky bite, like fall had already come even though it was mid-August and people in New York were barely dressed. The trees were losing their leaves—Danny felt them landing in his hair and heard them crunching under his boots when he walked. He was looking for a doorbell, a knocker, a light: some way into this place or at least a way to find the way in. He...
  • Q&A: Elder-Care Technology

    Elder Care expert Marion Somers talks about easy ways to use technology to help take care of aging relatives.
  • Award Offered for Loch Ness Monster Photo

    Whether an elephant, a plesiosaur, a real monster or nothing at all, Nessie is back. After a new film of the Loch Ness monster was released early this month, a British bookmaker has decided to offer 1 million pounds to anyone who takes a picture of the sea creature at this weekend’s Rock Ness music festival. They’re even providing disposable cameras to 50,000 eager participants. Of course, this isn’t the first time that monster hunters have trekked to the Scottish Highlands. Here’s a timeline of the Nessie legend. ...
  • Paris Hilton's Celebrity Justice

    Hotel heiress Paris Hilton went to jail, came home for medical reasons—and has now been sent back again. Inside the strangest journey into celebrity justice since O.J.
  • TV: The End of 'The Sopranos'

    One of the perks of being a TV critic is that you get to see all the shows before the public does. So you can imagine what my week has been like. Everyone who knows what I do for a living has asked me: "Does Tony die at the end of 'Sopranos'?" One person framed the question like this: "Do we know what happens at the end of 'Sopranos'?" To which I responded: "We can't know because you obviously do not." I know—bitchiness is never becoming, but I couldn't help myself. The fact is, I don't know how "The Sopranos" ends, and I'm very, very bitter about it. After all the hours I wasted watching "Lucky Louie," at least HBO could slip me the finale. I promise I won't tell anyone.OK, that's probably not true—I am a reporter, after all. I'd have to tell someone, even if it were only my mother. But since HBO doesn't trust me, I have no choice but to make something up. What follows are my theories of what might happen to Tony and the gang (what's left of it) on this Sunday's series finale: ...
  • Murakami's Novel of Night

    A few days ago, my daughter, who just graduated from high school, was bemoaning the fact that when college runs out she'll never have summer vacation to look forward to again (this is a young woman who thinks ahead). I told her she was wrong, that summer vacation is a state of mind, and that as soon as the Memorial Day buzzer goes off, your brain somehow switches to a more relaxed frequency for the duration of summer. You may still go to work each morning, or carry on with the everyday responsibilities of life, but somehow it's not as onerous as it is the rest of the year. This is one of those things that's hard to explain, but I know it's true.How else to explain beach reading? We don't go on vacation the whole summer, but come June a lot of us do lighten the content of our reading lists for the next three or so months. (The phrase "beach reading" is, in fact, hideously misleading. Trust me, I lived at the beach for 12 years and have done the research: even under a beach umbrella,...
  • Listening In: Paris and the Pokey

    Should the Hilton hotel heiress be forced back to jail? Should she be allowed to serve out her term under house arrest? Should you care?
  • Q&A With 'La Vie En Rose' Star

    In ‘La Vie En Rose’ Marion Cotillard portrays legendary French chanteuse Edith Piaf in a performance that has been called extraordinary. Piaf ("the Little Sparrow") had a tumultuous life. Born in 1915 in the Belleville section of Paris to a 17-year-old Italian mother and a contortionist father, she was left as a young girl in the care of her fraternal grandmother who ran a brothel.When she was a young child, a severe case of conjunctivitis left her nearly blind. She recovered her sight after her grandmother’s prostitutes pooled their money to send her on a pilgrimage honoring Saint Theresa.Her life included being accused as an accessory to murder (she was acquitted), friendships with Charlie Chaplin and Marlene Dietrich, helping the French Resistance, having the love of her life (boxer Marcel Cerdan) die in a plane accident, a serious addiction to methadone and, oh yes, recording some of the most unforgettable songs of the last century. When she died in 1963, the streets of Paris...
  • Why Michael Moore Helped Save Enemy Site

    Jim Kenefick, 36, is the founder of Moorewatch.com, one of the Web's most visited anti-Michael Moore sites. So imagine Kenefick's surprise when he received a friendly voice mail last month—from Moore himself, calling from the Cannes Film Festival premiere of his agitprop documentary “Sicko.” The lefty filmmaker had two things to tell his cybercritic. First, he wanted Kenefick to know that he and his Web site appear prominently (albeit anonymously) in “Sicko,” his soon-to-be-released attack on the American health-care industry. In the film, Moore shows several of Kenefick’s blog posts where he pleads for money to keep MooreWatch.com alive because his wife's medical bills (Kenefick says she has a neurological disorder) have almost bankrupted him. He is saved at the last minute when a mysterious donor sends a $12,000 check, enough to keep the site going and pay insurance premiums for a year—which brought Moore to his second point. Before the world found out from his film, the filmmaker...
  • Horror: The New Chick Flick?

    In 1980, Roger Ebert reviewed the brutal grindhouse horror movie “I Spit On Your Grave,” about a woman who takes revenge on the four men who savagely raped her. Ebert called the film “a vile bag of garbage” that is “without a shred of artistic distinction.” He said watching it was one of the most depressing experiences of his life. When Hannah Forman, a 26-year-old amateur film theorist and feminist, saw the film for the first time in 2003, her reaction was quite different. “I felt really good after watching it,” Forman says.Having known about the film since her early teens, Forman was terrified to see it until, drawn in by intellectual curiosity, she gathered a group of friends to watch it. By the end, they were all cheering. “It was one of the first films I’d ever seen that showed a rape in natural lighting and from the victim’s perspective,” she says. “It’s not glamorized or sensationalized in any way. And it shows the woman getting revenge on the men who violated her, and she...
  • Q&A: 'Monster Pig' Hunter Tells His Story

    Last month, an 11-year-old Alabama boy made headlines across the globe when he felled a giant hog on a hunting reserve. Photos swept the Internet, and Jamison Stone’s trophy was dubbed Monster Pig and Hogzilla II (the original Hogzilla, killed in Georgia in 1994, weighed about 1,000 pounds). But animal-rights activists, hunting purists and even a few Photoshop aficionados began voicing doubts about the story, suggesting the photograph was a hoax or that the big pig was less wild, huge and terrifying than its nicknames implied. In fact, the hog was very real and very big, but it wasn’t feral, as the hunter originally believed. NEWSWEEK’s Kendyl Salcito caught up with Jamison and his father, now in their 14th minute of fame. Excerpts: ...