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  • How to Make an '08 Campaign Ad

    In March Philip de Vellis (a.k.a. ParkRidge47) ushered in an era of voter-generated campaign ads with his Hillary "1984" spot. Want to generate buzz? Andrew Romano asked him for tips: ...
  • Rudy: 'Swift Boat-able' on 9/11?

    As Rudy Giuliani's presidential campaign rolls along, there are more and more voices protesting that he's not the 9/11 hero America considers him to be. First among them: some firefighters. Many in New York City blame the former mayor for refusing to let them direct recovery efforts for their fallen brethren at Ground Zero in the weeks after the attack. (Giuliani cited safety concerns.) Others involved in the unprecedented recovery operation claim the Giuliani administration did not adequately enforce safety procedures, leaving workers exposed to harmful toxins at the attack site. (At the time, the Giuliani administration said it was doing all it could to protect workers in a stressful period.)Questions also persist about Giuliani on the day itself. As Wayne Barrett, a Giuliani biographer, has pointed out, the very images themselves of the mayor's trekking through apocalyptic ash in lower Manhattan suggest a Giuliani blunder: placing the city's emergency command center in the World...
  • Campaign 2008: Follow the Money!

    As Campaign 2008 heats up, so will fund-raising efforts. Some names and numbers to know: $4,600: That's the max individual donors can give a campaign—$2,300 for a primary, the same for a general election. It's still primary season, but some '08 candidates are taking in the full amount, thanks to a loophole that lets campaigns accept checks early. BUNDLING: To raise big bucks, campaigns hit up donors to solicit checks from their friends, family and colleagues. Elite members of Hillary Clinton's "Hillraisers" have pledged to raise $1 million apiece for her campaign. 527 GROUPS: Named for the federal tax code under which they file, these independent groups can raise and spend unlimited amounts of money on the election, as long as they don't coordinate with other campaigns. One famous 527: the Swift Boat Veterans for Truth, which spent $22 million in 2004 to defeat John Kerry.
  • Who's in Line To Be China's Next Leader?

    With no rival in sight, Hu Jintao, 64, is easy money to win five more years as No. 1 man at this year's party plenum. But he's already grooming a whole roster of successors for his likely retirement in 2012. The two at the top of the list: Li Keqiang  The favorite, 52 in July, has law and economics degrees and a Hu-like aura of prudence. A former Youth League head (also like Hu), he's now party chief of smokestack Liaoning province. Li Yuanchao No relation, 56. Another longtime Hu aide, also trained in law and econ, the party boss in Jiangsu is known for boldness—and has even hired some former Tiananmen activists.
  • BeliefWatch: Ground Zero's 'Shrine'

    Carole Pizzolante, from Ontario, Canada, is standing in a historic church in New York City, and she is trying not to cry. Before her is a wall, plastered with the faces of people killed on 9/11. "It's all so bloody senseless, I can't get through it," she says with a wave of her hand, and then her composure falters. She pauses and says, through tears, "What could anyone gain from doing something like this?"For years, St. Paul's Chapel was an important but overlooked tourist attraction. What St. Paul's had to offer was its history—it was built in 1766—and a pew, located at the side of the church where George Washington sat and worshiped after his Inaugural in 1789. Almost no one went there, in other words, and those who did were mostly financial-district office workers who liked to eat their lunches under the shade trees in the chapel's ancient cemetery. For years and years, six people, on average, attended Sunday-morning services there, says the Rev. Stuart Hoke, staff chaplain at St...
  • Far, Far Away From Home

    Buying a villa in Tuscany is so cliché. These days, luxury consumers want their holiday refuges to be off the beaten path.
  • Suites for the Sweet

    With accommodations like these on the market, nobody should be understated all the time.
  • Q&A With Steve Carell

    Steve Carell talks about 'The Office,' about keeping the elephants happy and about how to use irony in a sentence.
  • A Kapuscinski Valedictory

    Plenty of Central European writers have been obsessed with the theme of human memory. The poems of the late Polish Nobel Prize winner Czeslaw Milosz, the prose of Czech émigré Milan Kundera and the writings of countless others have focused on, as Kundera put it, how "ultimately everyone lets everything be forgotten."No one fought harder against that than Ryszard Kapuscinski, the Polish journalist turned literary superstar who died last January at age 74. And nowhere is this more explicit than in his last book, "Travels with Herodotus." Like many of his works, this is a collage of sorts, part travel writing, part self-reflection. But as befits a work that feels almost like a last testament, it's far more of the latter. He describes how in his travels he took along Herodotus' "The Histories," snatching it up as soon as a Polish translation was available during the post-Stalinist thaw in 1955. He views the Greek who lived in the fifth century B.C. as his role model, someone who set out...
  • Media Ethics: Should Paris Get Paid to Talk?

    Should news organizations pay celebs for their interviews? The issue hit the headlines this week amid reports that NBC had outbid its rivals at ABC by offering Paris Hilton $1 million to dish on her 45 days behind bars for violating her parole on a drunk-driving conviction. ABC confirmed that it had made a $100,000 offer for video rights to accompany the interview, which was rejected in favor of an NBC offer. NBC said only that "we don't pay for interviews." On Friday, in the face of intense criticism, both news organizations said they had no plans to air a Hilton interview.That doesn't end the debate about media outlets paying for access. Fierce competition to secure exclusive material have led to creative deals in which companies pay for related expenses, like production materials, while shying away from paying the subjects themselves. NEWSWEEK's Alexandra Gekas spoke with Tom Rosenstiel, director of the Project for Excellence in Journalism, a Washington-based nonpartisan research...
  • Actress Lucy Liu Speaks Out

    Considering that she has been traveling for almost two days to get from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) to London, Lucy Liu looks fresh-faced and enthusiastic. The actress—known for her roles in “Ally McBeal,” “Charlie’s Angels” and more recently on the hit show “Ugly Betty”—traveled to the DRC as a UNICEF ambassador visiting a rehabilitation center for child soldiers, a hospital for young girls who have been raped and an internally displaced persons (IDP) camp. The 38-year-old actress, who has a bachelor's degree in Asian studies from the University of Michigan, has been quietly working with UNICEF since 2004. But it is not just the plight of children that she wants to spotlight. She says she chose to play the role of an HIV-positive Chinese woman in last year’s film “3 Needles” to spread awareness about HIV and AIDS across Asia. Last year she also produced a documentary, “Freedom’s Fury,” that told the story of the 1956 Hungarian Revolution through the lens of the infamous...
  • David Ansen Reviews 'Sicko'

    Whatever you think of Michael Moore—and who doesn't have an opinion?—the man has an impeccable sense of timing. His newest polemic, "Sicko," takes aim at our disastrous health-care system at a moment in the national debate when even the die-hardest boosters of free enterprise acknowledge that major changes have to be made, if not the free universal health care that most Western countries offer, and that we resist.The "we," as Moore takes pains to show us, are the drug companies, the hospital industry, the bought-and-paid-for politicians and the health-insurance companies, the latter being the true focus of this alternately hilarious and heartbreaking screed. This time around, Moore spares us the spectacle of himself storming the offices of his villains, his camera ever ready to capture their clench-jawed embarrassment. He's more concerned with the victims—not the 50 million uninsured, but the much vaster numbers who have private health insurance, and suffer for it. We see their...
  • The Genius of P. G. Wodehouse

    Evelyn Waugh considered P. G. Wodehouse the greatest comic writer of his time: that would be from 1900, when he sold his first magazine article, to 1974, when his last book came out. (He died a year later, at 93.) And Waugh predicted that his determinedly escapist stories and novels “will continue to release future generations from captivity that may be more irksome than our own.” Right on both counts. The irksomometer overloaded years ago, and on the jacket of the new Everyman’s Library anthology “The Best of Wodehouse,” Waugh shares blurb space with David Foster Wallace.Wodehouse’s most popular creation, the team of foppish, feeble-brained Bertie Wooster and his quietly omniscient valet Jeeves, is a common literary archetype: Don Quixote/Sancho Panza, Mr. Pickwick/Sam Weller, Lear/the Fool, Frodo/Sam. But Wodehouse adds a folktale element: Bertie is a descendent of those witlings and third sons who complete their quests because of their innocence. In Wodehouse, the servant not...
  • Up Close & Edible: Apples

    To peel or not to peel? For apple lovers, that is the question. An apple's peel contains many important nutrients that, according to new research, can help fight cancer. But the apple has also gotten flack for its heavy pesticide content, which can be reduced by tossing the peel in the trash. What is an apple eater to do?In general, apples are a pretty healthy—and popular—snacking decision. The average American ate just under 17 pounds of fresh apples in 2005 alone, according to the U.S. Apple Association. Nutritionally, they're making a wise choice: the apple is low in calories, high in fiber and a good source for potassium and vitamin C."In terms of getting fiber, it's a great choice," says Marisa Moore, spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association. "It's also good for potassium, which most people don't get enough of."And there's good news about apple peels: a number of studies at Cornell University have found that that eating apples may help reduce the risk of cancer. The...
  • Egypt: The Problem With Wearing a Veil

    It was a risky—and frightening—experiment.  Taxis refused to stop for me, but male drivers kept pulling over to compliment my eyes (the only part of my body on show) and inviting me into their vehicles. Others just stared.  Why the unwelcome attention? Because I was wearing a niqab, the full face veil, on the streets of Cairo. Egypt may be a Muslim country, but its government places numerous restrictions on those who make this religious commitment. That, however, may be about to change in the wake of a decision earlier this month by Egypt’s High Administrative Court.A special chamber of the court ruled on June 9 that the American University in Cairo (AUC) could not bar a female scholar who wears the niqab from using university facilities.  That decision upheld a 2001 ruling by a lower court, which cited personal and religious freedom as the reason that Iman al-Zainy could not be barred from campus for wearing the garment. (Zainy was pursuing a Ph.D. in English at Egypt's prestigious...
  • BeliefWatch: An Atheist Uproar

    It may not be fair to call what's happening in the atheist community a backlash, since atheists have always been and continue to be one of the smallest, most derided groups in the country. In a recent NEWSWEEK Poll, only 3 percent of respondents called themselves atheists and only 30 percent said they'd ever vote for an atheist. No, what's happening in the "atheist, humanist, freethinkers" community is more like what happens to any ideological or political group as it matures: the hard-liners knock heads with the folks who want to just get along, and the cracks are beginning to show.At the center of this controversy is the humanist chaplain of Harvard University, a 30-year-old "secular rabbi" named Greg Epstein. In March, in remarks to the Associated Press, Epstein called the popular writers Sam Harris and Richard Dawkins "atheist fundamentalists." He accused the best-selling authors—he now includes Christopher Hitchens among them—of being more interested in polemics, in tearing...
  • Nancy Drew Is Back … On the Silver Screen

    Go get your flashlight—there's a mystery we need to solve. Nancy Drew, girl sleuth, who vanished from movie theaters nearly 70 years ago, suddenly reappears this week. Where has she been? And can the teenager time forgot appeal to a generation obsessed with the Pussycat Dolls? Let's get to the bottom of this.Before the new "Nancy Drew" movie, the 16-year-old crimefighter had last hit the silver screen in 1939. Back then, the Stratemeyer Syndicate's series of novels (by the pseudonymous Carolyn Keene) was just nine years old. Now, nearly 200 books later, the Nancy of the novels has traded the blue roadster for a hybrid, and she's been one of Simon & Schuster's most bankable brands since 1979, when it bought the rights from Stratemeyer. Apparently that didn't impress the movie industry, which has co-opted just about every other boomer-era character, from Inspector Gadget to the Brady Bunch. In Hollywood, Nancy Drew couldn't get, as they say, arrested.Nancy did have a short-lived ...
  • My Turn: I'm Happiest Dressed In My Birthday Suit

    I am a nudist. I am not a naturist. I am not awestruck when I see a green mountain range or a waterfall or a babbling brook—whatever that is. I love to look at tall glass buildings. I like to look at magnificent bridges. I was born in Manhattan, and when I moved to Queens, which is one of the boroughs of New York City, I was amazed that it had trees!I grew up with lustful images of Sophia Loren and Jane Russell—though I also liked Mitzi Gaynor. I used to watch Dagmar on TV and thought if I stood close to the TV I could see down her cleavage. In the 1960s and '70s, I would fantasize about women in their bikinis at the beach.Then, in 1999, I made my first visit to a clothing-optional beach in New Jersey. When I realized where I was, I tried to maintain my poise. My buddy said that he had never been there either, so this was a first for him too. We took off our shirts, but neither of us took off our bathing suits. I felt very uncomfortable wearing a suit while mostly everyone else was...
  • Does Your Child Need a Personal Trainer?

    Like many 13-year-olds, Adam Hillen likes sports. As a seventh grader in Mason, Ohio, he plays on his junior high school's football and wrestling teams. But his father became concerned when Adam began working out with his friends. "He would go to the weight room with a bunch of kids, and I just thought that invited injury," says Doug Hillen.So he took Adam to meet Doug Gibson, a personal trainer and president of Sensible Fitness in nearby Blue Ash. "I wanted Adam to learn the right way to lift weights," says Hillen. "I thought a personal trainer was the way to go."Gibson started Adam on basic strengthening moves, using lunges and leg presses to build up his leg muscles and glutes, and then eventually worked him into speed training, sprinting and lateral running drills, useful for his position as fullback on the football team. The sessions also helped him with his workouts outside the gym. "Doug teaches me a lot that I can do at my house," says Adam. More than eight weeks after Adam...
  • Kids and Injuries: Don't Go Overboard

    Kids need exercise, but how much is too much? Karen Springen asked Dr. Joel S. Brenner, a runner and pediatric sports-medicine specialist in Norfolk, Va., and lead author of "Overuse Injuries, Overtraining and Burnout in Child and Adolescent Athletes" in this month's Pediatrics, the journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics. ...
  • Will: Is Fred Thompson All Charm, No Substance?

    Tulip mania gripped Holland in the 1630s. Prices soared, speculation raged, bulbs promising especially exotic or intense colors became the objects of such frenzied bidding that some changed hands 10 times in a day. Then, suddenly, the spell was broken, the market crashed—prices plummeted in some cases to one one-hundredth of what they had been just days before. And when Reason was restored to her throne, no one could explain what the excitement had been about. Speaking of Fred Thompson ...Some say he is the Republicans' Rorschach test: They all see in him what they crave. Or he might be the Republicans' dot-com bubble, the result of restless political investors seeking value that the untutored eye might not discern and that might be difficult to quantify but which the investors are sure must be there, somewhere, somehow.One does not want to be unfair to Thompson, who may have hidden depths. But ask yourself this: If he did not look like a basset hound who had just read a sad story...
  • Cracking Down on 'Murderabilia'

    It's called 'murderabilia'—the buying and selling of items connected to grisly crime scenes. And it's a brisk business online. Inside the campaign to police the murder market.
  • Design: Serious Fun

    Taking your children to the playground is a good way to fool them into getting exercise. But all playgrounds were not created equal. TIP SHEET found five that go well beyond the obligatory slide, seesaw and swing set. ...
  • Wal-Mart Heiress's Museum Unnerves Art Elites

    Alice Walton made a deal last November to buy Thomas Eakins's 1876 masterpiece "The Gross Clinic" from Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia for $68 million. Walton (Sam's daughter and Wal-Mart heiress) wanted it not for her living room but to hang in the public museum she's creating in her hometown of Bentonville, Ark. "This is the holy grail of American painting," said John Wilmerding, a trustee of the National Gallery and Walton's art adviser. But Wilmerding should have remembered that the holy grail is elusive. When news of the sale broke, the City of Brotherly Love went ballistic. Thanks to a clause in the deal, Philadelphia was given 45 days to match the price. Locals turned their pockets inside out, whether it was an art student's dropping a few bucks in a coffee can or the Annenberg Foundation's rushing a $10 million gift. Anne d'Harnoncourt, director of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, thought losing "The Gross Clinic" would be like Amsterdam's losing Rembrandt's "The...
  • Book Excerpt: Holly Peterson's 'The Manny'

    If you want to see rich people act really rich, go to St. Henry’s School for Boys at three p.m. on any weekday. Nothing makes rich people crazier than being around other rich people who might be richer than they are. Private school drop-off and pickup really gets them going. It’s an opportunity to stake their claim, show their wares, and let the other parents know where they rank in the top .001 percent of the top .0001 percent.A cavalcade of black SUVs, minivans, and chauffeured cars snaked its way up the block beside me as I ran to my son’s after-school game. I’d skipped another meeting at work, but nothing was going to keep me that day. Gingko trees and limestone mansions lined the street where a crowd gathered in front of the school. I steeled myself and waded into a sea of parents: the dads in banker suits barking into their phones, the moms with their glamorous sunglasses and toned upper arms-many with dressed-up little darlings by their sides.These children play an important...
  • Talk Transcript: Sean Smith on Angelina Jolie

    "A Mighty Heart," starring Angelina Jolie, is based on the best-selling book by Mariane Pearl about the murder of her husband, Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl, by Al Qaeda members in Karachi, Pakistan, in early 2002. The movie details Mariane's struggle—with the help of Journal editors, Pakistan counterterrorism experts, FBI agents and others—to unravel the terrorist network and find Danny. Much in Mariane's life has changed since then, including the birth of their son, Adam, who is now 5 years old. The film opens June 22. Pearl spoke to NEWSWEEK's Sean Smith from her home in Paris about the film, her friendship with Jolie, the politics of terror, and the true meaning of revenge. Excerpts: ...
  • Fewer Americans Are Hunting and Fishing

    If you’re a squirrel or a trout, we’ve got some good news for you: Americans are hunting and fishing less. Every five years, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service puts together a massive survey of outdoor recreation, and the 2006 preliminary numbers were released today. They show ominous trends, depending on your worldview—or species. The number of anglers has dropped 12 percent since 2001; the hunter count has fallen off by 4 percent during the same five-year period. This doesn’t mean Americans aren’t spending time outdoors or interacting with wild animals; “wildlife watching” is up 8 percent since 2001. They’re just choosing not to kill them so much.Though the final report won’t be available until November of this year, the preliminary findings reveal a downward pattern that worries many sportsmen: over the last 15 years or so, millions fewer people have been hunting and fishing in a country with a rapidly expanding population. There are countless reasons for the trend, chief among...
  • Books: The Return of Arkady Renko

    I was telling a friend the other day that I was nearly done with the Martin Cruz Smith novel “Stalin’s Ghost” and that I was enjoying it. “Well, he’s got a good character,” my friend commented. My friend is no fool. Arkady Renko, Smith’s much-abused Moscow police detective, is, for a fact, a great character. And durable, having now lived through six novels, a trip to Cuba, a sojourn in Chernobyl and an impersonation by William Hurt in the movie of “Gorky Park.”Renko is an unwilling hero. He isn’t particularly idealistic, or if he is, his idealism is all wrapped up in his professionalism. He can’t stand to do anything less than a thorough job. So, near the beginning of “Stalin’s Ghost,” he comes across a crime scene—a man face down at his kitchen table with a cleaver in his neck and a hysterical, blood-spattered wife in the bedroom. Detectives are already on the scene, the woman has confessed, and yet Renko can’t help asking questions. He’s bothered by the angle of the cleaver, by...
  • The Best Endings, and the Worst

    Say what you will about how “The Sopranos” ended—and people are still giving us an earful—it got us thinking about what makes a good ending to a story … and a bad ending. So in the time it takes to say “happily ever after,” we began assembling lists of good endings for movies, television series and books, and some bad ones. Curiously, it was much harder to think of bad endings—remember, we’re not talking about all good or all bad movies, books or shows—that’s a list for another day. No, the trick here is to name works of art that end memorably, one way or the other.
  • Is Reality TV Over?

    Donald Trump has a natural gift for spinning bad news in his favor. When his reality competition show “The Apprentice” turned up conspicuously missing from NBC's fall line-up, he immediately pounced with a statement saying that he wasn't being fired from the show, he was quitting to work on another “major new TV venture.”Trump's “Apprentice” business partner, reality TV's eminent creative mind Mark Burnett, will have much more trouble untangling himself from the wreckage. While his biggest franchises—“Survivor” and “The Apprentice”--effectively revolutionized television and dominated ratings in their early seasons, Burnett's recent endeavors have not yielded the same returns.This summer, Burnett debuted two new series, “On the Lot,” on Fox, and “Pirate Master,” on CBS. “On the Lot,” an “Apprentice”-style competition with aspiring filmmakers, bowed to an audience of just 8.5 million viewers, which means it lost around 70 percent of the 30 million viewers who were watching the ...
  • Oops. The Movie's Leaked Online

    Michael Moore's new documentary about America's health-care system and pharmaceutical industry may be called “Sicko,” but chances are he's the one feeling a little queasy today. Although it's not due to hit theaters until June 29, “Sicko” is already playing on thousands of screens across the country—the result of a leak that has it playing for free on numerous peer-to-peer networks online, including BitTorrent, Pirate Bay and others.Moore, the controversial left-leaning director behind “Farenheit 9/11” and “Bowling for Columbine,” could not be immediately reached for comment. But a spokesperson at The Weinstein Company, Moore's distributor, tried to put a positive spin on the apparent piracy. “Health care impacts everybody right in their homes, and it is not surprising that people are eager to see 'Sicko' and become part of a larger movement,” Sarah Rothman wrote in an e-mail to NEWSWEEK. “We are responding aggressively to protect our film, but from our research it is clear that...
  • L.A. County Sheriff: Too Close to Hollywood?

    Los Angeles County Sheriff Leroy (Lee) Baca has a distinguished record. A popular elected official, Baca, a Republican, has run virtually unopposed since first winning office in 1998. He has been praised by civil-rights groups, civil libertarians, minority activists and others for establishing programs for mental illness, drug abuse and domestic violence, plus an independent office to investigate officer misconduct. Despite all that, Baca will undoubtedly be best remembered as the man who gave Paris Hilton a GET OUT OF JAIL FREE card.Baca drew the world's attention when he released the hotel heiress from jail after having served only a few days of her sentence for violating probation on an alcohol-related reckless-driving charge. The move was swiftly reversed by a Los Angeles Superior Court judge, who sent Paris back to the pokey—and put Baca on the hot seat. A recall petition has been mounted by his critics. And the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors has ordered Baca to report...
  • Starr: Baseball's Racial Divide

    Many black fans believe Barry Bonds is being singled out. He is. But that doesn't necessarily mean his treatment has been unfair.
  • Remembering Ruth Bell Graham

    Mornings were chaos. “Four full-blooded little Grahams,” the young mother wrote in her journal. “ I feel this a.m. it’s gotten quite beyond me. They fight, they yell, they answer back. Breakfast is dreadful ... Now they’ve gone off to school looking nice enough (for once) and with a good breakfast but with the scrappiest of family prayers ... Grumbling, interrupting, slurring one another, impudent to me. So now they’re off, I’m in bed with my Bible thinking it through—or rather, trying to.”Ruth Bell Graham wrote this in 1957 while her husband Billy Graham was off crusading in New York City, a reminder that behind public lives—for no one has lived more publicly than Billy Graham—are extraordinary lives lived in private. The passage also makes the poignant point that with her death on June 14 at age 87, the Graham family has lost its heart. “I am so grateful to the Lord that He gave me Ruth,” Billy Graham said in a statement issued after her death. “Especially for these last few years...