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  • Anna Nicole Smith and Human Growth Hormone

    The dead starlet's autopsy revealed that she was injecting human growth hormone to counter the effects of aging and promote weight loss. Does that work? Inside the HGH boom—and the backlash.
  • Humor: Choose Your Own Hillary Positions

    Crisscrossing the nation in her quest for the 2008 Democratic nomination, Sen. Hillary Clinton today unveiled new state-of-the-art software that will enable voters to customize her positions on a host of issues. Dubbed "Hillary 8.0,” the software will be handed out for free at all of Clinton’s campaign rallies and could provide the technological advantage she needs to sew up her party’s nod.At a rally in Chicago, campaign workers handed out the software disks to supporters while Clinton told the crowd, "Hillary 8.0 means victory for Hillary in '08." The New York senator told her supporters that the new application "will make me the very best Hillary you want me to be, whatever that happens to be."The software, compatible for both Mac and PC users, allows potential Hillary voters to configure their very own version of Sen. Clinton, choosing from over 57,000 positions on a variety of issues ranging from health care to immigration to the war in Iraq.But according to one early user,...
  • Study: A Downside to Day Care?

    A new study finds that children who regularly attend day-care centers develop more behavioral problems in kindergarten than those that don't. What's a parent to do?
  • Vanessa Redgrave at 70: A Magical Role

    Vanessa Redgrave is standing in the damp chill of a New York City street smoking a cigarette. It's early January and she's just given a talk, with writer Joan Didion, about "The Year of Magical Thinking," the upcoming one-woman Broadway show that Didion adapted from her 2005 memoir of her husband's death. Suddenly, the door of the building flies open and out bounds none other than Jane Fonda, Redgrave's costar from "Julia," the 1977 film for which Redgrave won an Oscar. They hug, and then Redgrave spills some big news: "I got married!" Fonda squeals, and the two clutch hands and beam like schoolgirls. Redgrave hasn't gone public about her marriage to her longtime companion, Franco Nero (and seems to have forgotten a reporter is standing nearby). But it's not surprising that matrimony is on her mind. Marriage is a powerful thread in "The Year of Magical Thinking," Didion's exploration of mourning and the near-madness it caused. She and the writer John Gregory Dunne were married for...
  • Health: Can Exercise Make You Smarter?

    Exercise does more than build muscles and help prevent heart disease. New science shows that it also boosts brainpower—and may offer hope in the battle against Alzheimer's.
  • A New Battle Over Gays in the Military

    Brian Fricke says he played the "pronoun game" for about three years. The Marine Corps sergeant substituted "she" for "he" when he told peers about his relationships, keeping the fact that he was gay from all but a small number in his unit. It wasn't until the day he left for Iraq in 2004 that the pretending got to be too much. Fricke, a Tennessean stationed at Miramar air base near San Diego, was being driven to the departure point by his boyfriend, Brad. The two had been together for several months, and it dawned on Fricke at the staging area that, with the bombings in Iraq, he might not see Brad again. Around them, Marines were taking leave of their own loved ones. Fricke felt the resentment rise. "I'm putting my life on the line like the others," he recalls feeling. "Damn it, if I'm not going to say goodbye to the person I love." Fricke kissed Brad hard on the lips. When he turned to face his unit, he realized no one cared. "People want to know that you'll be there for them in...
  • Book Excerpt: Frank Portman's 'King Dork'

    It seems as if I am always horny.That’s bad because the chances that I will ever get to express that horniness in the context of a fulfilling relationship with an actual other person have always seemed pretty slim. It’s a thing you have to live with. In fact, before October 1 of this year, I had never even touched a girl in “that way.” And even then—but I’ll explain all that soon enough.In youth-oriented movies and books, the guy like me often has a huge crush on a specific blond cheerleader who doesn’t know he exists and would never stoop to talking to him. Or maybe she is kind of mean to him even though she’s friends with him and asks him for advice on how to get the football guy to make out with her, which drives him crazy, and so forth. Now, don’t get me wrong, I’m definitely that guy. But there isn’t any one particular girl that fits that formula, and the idea that someone like that would ever be friendly with me in any sense, even as a device to dramatize my own pain and...
  • Will: The Ferocious Power Struggle in American Politics

    "Look at him," said Casey Stengel, expressing incomprehension about a clean-living pitcher. "He don't smoke, he don't drink, he don't chase women and he don't win." In politics, too, winning is the objective. Today, both parties have an unusually small number of kamikaze activists—people willing, even eager, to go down in flames with a presidential candidate they consider so ideologically lovely that they do not care that he or she probably cannot cobble together 270 electoral votes.Both parties must calculate how much would, or should, this or that facet of a candidate's political program be an impediment to his or her winning the presidency. Today, as usual, but in unusual ways, such calculations must be guided by this rule: Think regionally.The nation long ago removed such impediments to voting as property requirements, poll taxes and literacy tests. Perhaps we should add one: No one should be allowed to vote until he or she has driven across the country. Why? Because voters...
  • The Editor's Desk

    The ancients, it turns out, were right: there is a connection between the brain (what they called the mind) and the body. From Confucian philosophy in China to yoga in India to the centrality of the "gymnasium" in Greece, fitness, or at least the quest for fitness, was not an afterthought, or what we might refer to as a "lifestyle choice," or an occasional resolution. It was essential. In what I suspect is one of the few links between George W. Bush and the Father of Medicine, the Web site of the President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports cites Hippocrates: "All parts of the body, if used in moderation and exercised in labors in which each is accustomed, become ... healthy, well-developed and age more slowly, but if unused and left idle they become liable to disease, defective in growth and age quickly."Health is one of those subjects that can be of little interest until, in an instant, circumstances make it compelling and consuming. For decades we have been committed to...
  • GodTube: What Would Jesus Download?

    What would Jesus download? One of the hottest sites on the Internet is GodTube.com, the Christian answer to YouTube. It's a goofy, fascinating window into the world of Christian youth. There's a clip of Ray Comfort, the popular evangelical preacher, demonstrating the perfection of God's creation with an actual banana. It's hard—OK, impossible—not to see it as an (unintentional?) dirty joke. Another clip sends up the hip-hop anthem "Baby Got Back": This version is called "Baby Got Bible" and contains hilarious lyrics like "Bless me, bless me and teach me about John Wesley."GodTube is the brainchild of Chris Wyatt, an excitable 38-year-old student at the Dallas Theological Seminary and former television producer and Internet entrepreneur. In 1999, he says, he "hit a bump in the road, and my mother told me I had to get to know the Lord." Within six weeks he had found Jesus, and in the years that followed, he tried his hand at various Christian enterprises, including a Christian version...
  • War Film: The Politics and Drama of '300'

    The New York Times and the government of Iran agree: the movie "300" has no redeeming social value. The movie, which depicts the brave stand of 300 Spartans against a marauding army of hundreds of thousands of Persians at Thermopylae in 480 B.C., "is about as violent as 'Apocalypto' and twice as stupid," according to A. O. Scott, the Times' movie critic. The Iranians, who presumably don't screen many Mel Gibson movies, were nonetheless even more offended. The movie is aimed at "humiliating" Iranians, who are descendants of the ancient Persians, said Javad Shamghardi, cultural adviser to Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad: "300" is "part of a comprehensive U.S. psychological warfare aimed at Iranian culture." And this was the headline in the Ayan No newspaper: HOLLYWOOD DECLARES WAR ON IRANIANS.To most moviegoers, "300" may or may not evoke the Clash of Civilizations, but it certainly is popular among young American men. The R-rated film grossed more than $70 million its opening...
  • Growing Lights: What's New in Chandeliers

    No longer are chandeliers necessarily stodgy, showy and crystal-studded. Today's eye-catching modern fixtures come in a variety of shapes and incorporate unusual—and often recycled—materials, from goose feathers to Bic pens. They can work just as well in traditional homes as in contemporary ones. Some are even designed to be energy efficient as well.Online retailer Inmod sells an assortment of its signature space-age "Sputnik" chandeliers. The chrome designs are at once retro and modern and can be customized to suit any space. One customer recently ordered a 127cm model, with 50 shiny silver arms jutting out in every direction, according to cofounder Casey Choron. Its higher-end, imported models include handblown glass versions in red, white or black. The Ika Trio in red looks like a three-tiered bundle of red-hot chilis and retails for $1,699 (inmod.com).New York-based retailer Moss has long been known for infusing a whimsical streak into its furniture and interior design; the...
  • What the Doctors Do

    They know what's best for us when it comes to exercise, but do they follow their own advice? Read all about it.
  • An 'Exercise Snack' Plan

    You don't have to train for a marathon or pump iron to burn calories. How to make the most of the workout opportunities that are built into your day.
  • Is Pet Food Good For Fido?

    Is pet food good for your animals? After the deaths of 15 cats and one dog from commercial products that had been contaminated by rat poison, some pet owners wondered whether any store-bought food is really safe. NEWSWEEK’s Alexandra Gekas spoke with Dr. Tony Buffington, Professor of Veterinary Clinical Sciences at Ohio State University and spokesman for the American Veterinary Medical Association about whether animal lovers should give up on kibble for good. Excerpts: ...
  • Lethem's Rock and Roll Romance

    I haven’t kept strict count, but I’m pretty sure this is only the second time Jonathan Lethem has put a kangaroo in one of his novels. If so, maybe I should stick with the ones with the ’roos. Because I loved “Gun With Occasional Music,” Lethem’s debut, and I have been only fond, but not wild, about everything since. Now comes “You Don’t Love Me Yet,” and once I got by the awkward title, I found myself in a bumpy but charming novel about a Los Angeles rock band on its way up. Lethem’s not trying to prove anything here—and every time I caught myself wishing he’d tried a little harder, I’d recall that trying too hard has been his big problem the last few novels. This time, he’s coasting, having fun and not out to prove anything. The result is a novel with some air in it—not air as in airheaded but air as in atmosphere and breathability. This novel is not going to expand Lethem’s reputation as a serious novelist, but its cleverness and the good will with which it creates and then...
  • Books: Why Was 1919 So Bad?

    While reading journalist Ann Hagedorn’s “Savage Peace,” a wide-ranging, information-rich, sometimes frustrating study of the United States in 1919, you can’t help thinking you’d even prefer to live in 2007. Though she subtitles the book “Hope and Fear in America,” she has to look hard to find the hope. A nonstop transatlantic flight! A ringing minority opinion in a free-speech case! The first dial telephones! One of the Hagedorn’s hopeful figures, Helen Keller—who became famous by appearing in a 1919 movie—was genuinely inspirational, not merely for overcoming both blindness and deafness, but for her progressive politics. Who remembers now that she was a pacifist, a feminist and a cofounder of the ACLU? But Hagedorn oversells another chief exhibit, British physicist Arthur Eddington’s experimental verification of Albert Einstein’s theory of relativity, as a “real articulation of international cooperation” that “transcended earthbound troubles”—without mentioning the atomic bomb....
  • Movies: Soccer and Sexism

    In Iran, women are not allowed to attend soccer games. This rule is supposed to protect them from the bad language and crude behavior of men. But many soccer-loving girls try to get around this by disguising themselves as boys and sneaking into the stadium. In "Offside," the acclaimed Iranian director Jafar Pahani—whose powerful film "The Circle" examined the plight of women in a sexist, repressive country—shows us what happens when a group of savvy Tehran girls tries to sneak into the World Cup qualifying match between Iran and Bahrain.This buoyant but barbed comedy, which opens in the U.S. today, uses nonprofessional actors and was shot while the actual soccer match was unfolding. (Like the girls, Pahani had to use subterfuge to make the movie, lying to the authorities about its subject.) These spirited girls aren't overtly political: they just love the sport, and the young soldiers who round them up and guard them in a makeshift pen inside the stadium are equally ardent soccer...
  • Gellman: Religious Freedom, Captain America and '300'

    The great spiritual questions of our time concern the use of power to secure freedom. The world of Islam has never faced the jarring revolution of the Enlightenment, which severed Christianity’s ties between faith and power, and, lacking a Muslim Voltaire, some segments of Islam still pine for a restored caliphate in which the sword is wielded by mullahs and the line between religion and the state is obliterated. In the West, this melding of faith and secular power was rejected 400 years ago. Rendering worldly power unto Caesar left faith free to focus on the promise of personal salvation.One crushing obstacle to personalized religion always remained, however, and that was the threat to freedom. Religion can choose to live outside of what Marx called “the noisy din of world history” only as long as that din does not become a deafening roar. Fascism, communism, and now jihadist terrorism compel religions to ask whether faith can truly survive without freedom.If faith is truly...
  • Men, Chlamydia and the Cycle of Infection

    Chlamydia is on the rise, and according to a recent study, more young women are suffering from recurring bouts of this common STD than previously thought. Is it time to start testing men who may be unwitting carriers?
  • Q&A: America's Political Divide

    Why does every election leave the country holding its collective breath? Why have campaigns become more bitter, even with increasing numbers of voters who identify with neither party? According to political scientists Earl Black and Merle Black in their new book, "Divided America: The Ferocious Power Struggle in American Politics" (Simon & Schuster), neither Democrats nor Republicans, neither conservatives nor liberals represent governing majorities in the United States. The parties, they write, "are locked in a power struggle in which victory or defeat is possible in every round of elections for every national institution." NEWSWEEK's Karen Breslau spoke with Merle Black, professor of politics and government at Emory University (and the twin brother of Earl Black, a professor of political science at Rice University), about his findings. Excerpts: ...
  • TV: A Radio Classic Gets a Look

    Last summer, the Chicago Tribune printed a peculiar story about the nationally syndicated public-radio show “This American Life.” The story wasn’t so much about the show, which has a loyal weekly following of 1.7 million listeners, so much as it was about the show’s staff and their struggles to get situated in their new home, New York City, after a decade of happy times in Chicago, where “This American Life” got its start. It contained anecdotes about braving the New York real-estate market, good-natured grumbling about cockroaches and nostalgic sighs over beloved cafes and doggy-care centers that had been left behind in the Windy City. In short, the story had no journalistic merit whatsoever. “What’s funny is, while the guy was writing it, I kept asking him, ‘Why is this a story for a newspaper?’” says Ira Glass, the geek-chic host of “This American Life,” whose clever-but-not-too-clever, folksy-but-not-too-folksy stories about ordinary Americans with extraordinary tales have...
  • Fighting Cancer: What Elizabeth Edwards Can Expect

    Last fall, Elizabeth Edwards was the guest speaker at a Boston conference sponsored by NEWSWEEK and Harvard Medical School. She was in the midst of a tour promoting her recently published book, "Saving Graces." Although Edwards spoke in detail about the greatest trials in her life, especially the death of her 16-year-old son in a car accident and her struggle with breast cancer, she conveyed an inspiring optimism about her future. That optimism reappeared today when she and her husband, presidential contender John Edwards, announced that her cancer has returned, this time to her bones. Still, she told a crowded press conference: "I don't look sickly. I don't feel sickly." Despite the devastating news, the couple vowed to continue campaigning. "This is the most extraordinarily unselfish woman I have ever known," her husband said, with a touch of awe in his voice. Her doctor is waiting for the results of some tests taken this week before starting treatment. To find out more about what...
  • Is Pet Food Properly Regulated?

    It's been nearly a week since Canadian pet-food manufacturer Menu Foods Inc. recalled some 60 million cans and pouches of wet food linked to the deaths of at least 15 cats and one dog, yet authorities still can't explain exactly what went wrong. Some critics and animal lovers are honing in on what they see as lax regulation of the $15 billion pet-food industry in the United States."There's almost a void there," says Bob Vetere, president of the American Pet Product Manufacturers Association. "There is no real pet-food department of any federal agency."Technically, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is responsible for ensuring that pet foods, like human foods, are safe to eat, truthfully labeled and produced under sanitary conditions. But on Tuesday, FDA officials admitted that the regulation of pet food takes a back seat to its regulatory obligations of other food and drug sectors, and that inspections of pet-food processing plants are done only on a for-cause basis."There are...
  • Bush's Latest Stab at Damage Control

    Bush's latest efforts at damage control are extraordinarily fair-minded and cooperative. Or so the president says. Reading between the lines at the White House press conference.
  • Sloan: When Private Equity Goes Public

    You've got to be kidding me. That may be the only appropriate response to the news that the kings of "private" equity, Blackstone Group, may soon take their own company public.Private-equity houses, you see, always talk up the joys of being private, about how you can manage for the long term as a private enterprise rather than having to tailor your business to Wall Street whims. Private companies don't have to tell anybody anything about what they're doing. Forget having to give quarterly guidance to Wall Street. Stop sweating Sarbanes-Oxley. And no more of those embarrassing disclosures about how many zillions of dollars top executives make.So if being private is such a good thing for the companies that Blackstone buys on behalf of its clients, why would going public be a good thing for Blackstone itself? Blackstone — still a private company — declined to comment, as usual. So I'll have to answer that question myself.No, I don't think the answer is "hypocrisy." I think it's...
  • Humor: Iran Declares War on Sparta

    In what foreign policy experts believe to be a direct response to the hit American movie “300,” Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad today declared war on Sparta. Even for the mercurial Ahmadinejad, the move struck many diplomatic insiders as extraordinary, since the consensus in the international community is that the city-state of Sparta no longer exists.But, according to a close associate of Ahmadinejad, the Iranian president’s thoughts turned to war after seeing a matinee showing of “300” this past Saturday at the Tehran Cineplex 12. “He was hopping mad at the way the Spartans kicked the Persians’ butts,” the aide said. “I haven’t seen him this angry since he saw that thing with Hugh Grant and Drew Barrymore.”At a press conference in Tehran today, President Ahmadinejad directed his most barbed comments at the 300 Spartan warriors depicted in the film. “So you think you are a match for the entire Persian army?” Ahmadinejad said. “Well, let’s see if you’re a match for Iran’s...
  • Sloan: The Double Dummy Can Be Very Smart

    Tax law isn't exactly a bundle of laughs. But tax lawyers occasionally compensate by inventing hilarious terms like "horizontal double dummy" to describe the paper-shuffling that they do. Most of us, of course, wouldn't recognize a double dummy if we tripped over it (or is it them?). But knowing about double dummies—a term apparently borrowed from bridge— is the key to unlocking one of the little mysteries of the newspaper business. To wit: why can McClatchy Newspapers get a tax break by selling its Minneapolis operations for less than it paid, while the New York Times Co. can't do that with The Boston Globe, and Tribune Co. can't do it with the Los Angeles Times? The answer: McClatchy did a double-dummy deal when it acquired the Star Tribune's parent company, Cowles Media, in 1998. But Times and Tribune did standard corporate reorganizations when they bought Affiliated Publications and Times Mirror, respectively, in 1993 and 2000. Most acquiring companies could do double dummies,...
  • Which Is Better?

    We face important food choices each day: Fries or salad? Juice or soda? Think you always know which has fewer calories and grams of fat? Test your nutritional IQ here. 1. a) Big Mac and small fries b) Uno's individual deep-dish pizza 2. a) Tuna-salad sandwich b) Roast-beef sandwich 3. a) Cheesecake Factory's cheesecake slice b) Cheesecake Factory's carrot-cake slice 4. a) Dunkin' Donuts Caramel Creme hot latte b) Dunkin' Donuts glazed doughnut
  • Richard Nixon Makes It to Broadway

    Near the end of the new play "Frost/Nixon," about the former president's 1977 post-Watergate interview with television journalist David Frost, the phone rings in Frost's hotel room. Thinking it's his girlfriend calling to ask what he wants for dinner, Frost picks up and barks: "I'll have a cheeseburger." But it's Nixon, and he's been drinking. "Mmm. Sounds good. I used to love cheeseburgers," the ex-president says. "But Doctor Lundgren made me give them up. And switched me to cottage cheese and pineapple instead. He calls them my Hawaiian burgers." Then Nixon—who had a habit of drunken dialing—remembers the real reason for his call. Frost has been interviewing him for two days and in the morning will conduct the final session on Watergate. Nixon wants to acknowledge that only one of the men can survive the next day's face-off with his image intact, but he relishes the prospect of the fight—and he's not above baiting his opponent. "Watergate. It's a small consolation to me that for...
  • BeliefWatch: Evangelical Split Over Environment

    What has Rich Cizik done to make Jim Dobson so mad? Cizik has, for 26 years, been the Washington-based lobbyist for the National Association of Evangelicals, a job one would hardly call high profile. Over the past year, though, he has become something of a celebrity: the evangelical leader who speaks for the cause of environmentalism.Last week Dobson, the paterfamilias of Focus on the Family and the religious right's standard-bearer and junkyard dog, signed a letter with two dozen others, excoriating Cizik for his environmental activism. Cizik is out of his depth on the issue, the letter argued, and assumes a consensus where there is none. "If [Cizik] cannot be trusted to articulate the views of American evangelicals on environmental issues," said the letter, "then we respectfully suggest that he be encouraged to resign his post." To an outsider, the irate tone of the letter seemed odd. What had Cizik really done? Why would Dobson, arguably the most powerful evangelical in politics,...
  • Stromboli, Italy: Building On The Volcano

    The view from Punta la Bronzo Pizzeria on the upper reaches of the volcanic island of Stromboli is stunning. Tiny islands dot the turquoise sea in the distance, and dramatic cliffs tower above a black-sand beach below. The lifestyle is a blend of opulence and simplicity: Stromboli is car-free, the local community is generous to visitors and the food is divine. It's no surprise that wealthy Italians from the president of the republic, Giorgio Napolitano, to the luxe designers Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbana keep summer villas here. Lately, however, the blue skies are hazy and the fresh air is powdered with volcanic ash, thanks to an eruption that began on Feb. 27.The sight of red-hot lava running down the sides of Stromboli should not have come as a surprise to its swank residents. Stromboli is the most active volcano on the planet, says the U.S. Geological Survey. Yet new construction has risen nearly 20 percent in the last decade, mostly multimillion-euro villas tucked into the...
  • Good Food, Delivered

    Unlike George Jetson, we'll probably never push a button in our kitchens and have a freshly cooked meal spring up from the counter. But the next best thing might be opening the front door to find a week's worth of healthy family dinners waiting for you. That's the idea behind a new crop of meal-delivery services that are popping up online. Some deliver fresh food, others frozen. But they all claim to help you eat more nutritiously, avoid junk food and save hours of time. Do these meals taste any better than what you can find in your frozen-food aisle? And are they worth the extra money? We sampled four services and found that the surprising answer, in most cases, is "yes." A guide: ...
  • My Turn: Seeing a Smile I Had Not Known Existed

    Under the fluorescent lights and lazy ceiling fans of a Pentecostal church in Milwaukee, I watched my oldest brother crouch down and rest his head in his hands. He began to pray silently, moving his lips. Two pastors knelt alongside him and rubbed his back. They, too, began to pray. It was a remarkable sight, because our family is Jewish. Even more remarkable was the fact that my brother was allowing himself to be touched.My brother Tim was diagnosed with autism as a young child in the '60s, but as he grew up his symptoms seemed closer to Asperger's disorder and severe OCD (obsessive-compulsive disorder), while he displayed the savant characteristics of autism. If Tim ate at a restaurant, a certain amount of time had to pass before he allowed himself to return. Before he could enter a room he would have to cross and recross the threshold. He couldn't quite balance his checkbook, but he could tell you what the weather was like on April 17, 1981.I was 12 years younger than Tim, and...
  • Web Wellness

    Home Food Safety homefoodsafety.org The site provides useful tips from the American Dietetic Association on such things as packing your kids' lunches to avoid spoilage. Calorie-Count calorie-count.com Create a personal profile and chart your weight-loss progress with this interactive site. It provides calorie counts and assigns nutrition grades for such varied foods as bratwurst (C-minus) and pomegranates (A). Office of Dietary Supplements ods.od.nih.gov If you take dietary supplements, this National Institutes of Health site will teach you about their benefits and side effects. Nutrition Café exhibits.pacsci.org/nutrition The site teaches kids nutrition facts through interactive games. Diet Facts dietfacts.com You don't have to be on a diet to be curious about what you're eating. This site lets you look up nutritional info by ingredient and by restaurant.
  • Sports: America's Passion for Paintball

    Sgt. Cory Elder smiled as he surveyed the field of battle. There were soldiers everywhere—300 camouflaged combatants gripping machine guns and barking into walkie-talkies. There were smoke grenades. There were Humvees. There was even an airplane. But despite all the accoutrements, this was hardly Fallujah, and these troops—in Coram, N.Y., last Sunday to play a paintball game called Behind Enemy Lines—were only weekend warriors. For now, that is. Hoping to convert today's wanna-bes into tomorrow's cadets, Elder, an Army recruiter, had stocked an "Army of One" tent with key chains, coffee mugs, footballs, baseball caps, T shirts and customized dog tags. Soon, a bunch of teenage boys were grasping for the prizes—and giving recruiters their names, numbers and e-mails in return. "This is our target audience," says Elder. "It's a perfect match."Though paintball won't replace bonuses or benefits as a top recruiting tool anytime soon, the fast-growing sport has emerged in recent months as a...
  • Filling Up With Less

    Jill O'Nan used to eat just one meal a day. But, as the joke goes, that meal began in the morning and didn't end until she went to sleep at night. As a freelance writer, O'Nan had no set meal schedule. "If McDonald's delivered, I probably wouldn't have left my house," says O'Nan, 45, who has battled the bulge since she was a child.With her supersize appetite, O'Nan's weight spiraled to 360 pounds. She tried dieting, but nothing worked. O'Nan did some research and stumbled across a little-known book called "Volumetrics" (harpercollins.com), which promised that she could manage her weight by choosing foods that the program calls "low in energy density," foods that make you feel satiated, or full, but that are also low in calories. She swapped her serving of fast-food fries for an even larger portion of boiled redskin potatoes in a garlic-dill sauce.She rediscovered her pressure cooker and started to make homemade meals, including soups and chili seasoned with dark chocolate. In four...
  • Quindlen: Political Pundits Must Rise Up

    This is not a column about Ann Coulter. Otherwise it would be irrelevant. When the conservative lounge act used an anti-gay slur to refer to John Edwards while speaking to a Republican gathering, she catapulted herself momentarily back into the public eye. That, of course, is what she was after. As Warren Beatty once said of Madonna, she doesn't want to live off-camera, much less talk. If it takes a bit of desperate bigotry to make the cameras whir—well, desperate times demand desperate measures."Desperate" is the key word here. The national snarkfest is on its way out, and good riddance. Like doo-wop when the Beatles showed up, an era is grinding to a close. The landscape of American discourse has grown lousy with agents provocateurs whose careers are built around delivering verbal depth charges, not information. The form is now officially past its sell-by date.The public has outgrown it.This is an election that really matters. NBC News recently reported that 73 percent of...
  • Think Thin To Get Thin

    At 5 feet 3 and 116 pounds, Judith Beck doesn't look like a threat to anyone. But America's junk-food peddlers should be afraid—very afraid—of this gentle, soft-spoken psychologist. Her new book, "The Beck Diet Solution," could help dieters swear off their Doritos once and for all. That's because it's perhaps the best diet book ever to focus on the psychology of permanent weight loss. In short, it doesn't tell you what foods to eat or avoid. Instead, it tells you how to stick to a healthy eating plan of your own choice—for good—by changing the way you talk to yourself when confronted with temptation, cravings and the inevitable dietary lapses. Beck spoke with NEWSWEEK's Anne Underwood. Excerpts: ...
  • Seasonal Secrets

    The period between the end of winter and the start of spring is the toughest time to find fresh produce to put on the table. TIP SHEET asked three chefs what healthy ingredients they're cooking with now. ...
  • Newsmakers: Naomi Campbell, Star Jones

    A judge has ordered Naomi Campbell to mop warehouse floors for five days as restitution for throwing a phone at her housekeeper last year. Just before the ruling, she spoke to Nicki Gostin. ...
  • How to Help Your Heart

    A Harvard cardiologist passes on the latest news about the tests you need, lowering blood pressure and the real pros and cons of drinking red wine.